Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 14 items for :

  • "feeling state" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Margaret Schneider, Andrea Dunn, and Daniel Cooper

Many adolescents do not meet public health recommendations for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). In studies of variables influencing adolescent MVPA, one that has been understudied is the affective response to exercise. We hypothesized that adolescents with a more positive affective response to acute exercise would be more active. Adolescents (N = 124; 46% male) completed two 30-min exercise tasks (above and below the ventilatory threshold [VT]), and wore ActiGraph accelerometers for 6.5 ± 0.7 days. Affective valence was assessed before, during, and after each task. A more positive affective response during exercise below the VT was associated with greater participation in MVPA (p < .05). The results are consistent with the hypothesis that individuals who have a more positive affective response to exercise will engage in more MVPA. To promote greater participation in MVPA among adolescents, programs should be designed to facilitate a positive affective experience during exercise.

Restricted access

Margaret Schneider and Priel Schmalbach

Background:

Little information exists as to the exercise intensity that adolescents enjoy and whether identifiable subgroups of adolescents will choose higher-intensity exercise.

Methods:

Healthy adolescents (N = 74; mean age = 11.09 years) completed a cardiorespiratory fitness test, a moderate-intensity exercise task, and an exercise task at an intensity that felt “good.” Heart rate (HR), work rate (WR), and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were assessed every 3 minutes.

Results:

During the “feels good” task, adolescents exercised at a HR recognized as beneficial for cardiovascular health (mean HR = 66% to 72% of HR at VO2peak). Adolescents who experienced a positive affective shift during the moderate-intensity task engaged in higher-intensity exercise during the feels-good task as compared with those whose affective response to moderate-intensity exercise was neutral or negative (76% of peak HR vs. 70% of peak HR, P < .01).There was no difference between groups in RPE.

Conclusions:

Adolescents tend to select an exercise intensity associated with fitness benefits when afforded the opportunity to choose an intensity that feels good. An identified subgroup engaged in higher-intensity exercise without a commensurate perception of working harder. Encouraging adolescents to exercise at an intensity that feels good may increase future exercise without sacrificing fitness.

Restricted access

Ed Maunder, Paul B. Laursen, and Andrew E. Kilding

Purpose:

To compare the physiological and performance effects of ad libitum cold-fluid (CF) and ice-slurry (IS) ingestion on cycling time-trial (TT) performance in the heat.

Methods:

Seven well-trained male triathletes and cyclists completed 2 maximaleffort 40-km cycling TTs in hot (35°C) and humid (60% relative humidity) conditions. In randomized order, participants ingested CF or IS (initial temperatures 4°C and –1°C, respectively) ad libitum during exercise. At each 5-km interval, time elapsed, power output, rectal and skin temperature, heart rate, and perceptual measures were recorded. The actual CF and IS temperatures during the 40-km TT were determined post hoc.

Results:

Performance time (2.5% ± 2.6%, ES = 0.27) and mean power (–2.2% ± 3.2%, ES = –0.15) were likely worse in the IS trial. Differences in thermoregulatory and cardiovascular measures were largely unclear between trials, while feeling state was worse in the later stages of the IS trial (ES = –0.31 to –0.95). Fluid-ingestion volume was very likely lower in the IS trial (–29.7% ± 19.4%, ES = –0.97). The temperatures of CF and IS increased by 0.37°C/min and 0.02°C/min, respectively, over the mean TT duration.

Conclusions:

Ad libitum ingestion of CF resulted in improved 40-km cycling TT performance compared with IS. Participants chose greater fluid-ingestion rates in the CF trial than in the IS trial and had improved feeling state. These findings suggest that ad libitum CF ingestion is preferable to IS during cycling TTs under conditions of environmental heat stress.

Restricted access

Jennifer Brunet, Eva Guérin, and Nicolas Speranzini

Angeles, CA) was employed as the main analytic strategy. To address the first objective, a series of LGMs were estimated to model changes in feeling states over time. Models were estimated separately for each feeling state to conserve power, and the robust maximum likelihood estimator was used to account

Restricted access

Jasmin C. Hutchinson, Zachary Zenko, Sam Santich, and Paul C. Dalton

to feeling state and motivation ( Seligman, Railton, Baumeister, & Sripada, 2013 , p. 130). This is of particular importance in health-promoting behaviors, where benefits are often gained far into the future (i.e., are temporally remote), and what is most salient at the crucial moment of decision

Restricted access

Rachel Arnold, Nicole Bolter, Lori Dithurbide, Karl Erickson, Blair Evans, Larkin Lamarche, Sean Locke, Eric Martin, and Kathleen Wilson

Edited by Kim Gammage

feeling state (pleasant to unpleasant), arousal state (excitement to boredom), and amount of physical effort (no exertion to maximal exertion). Significant differences between conditions emerged for arousal and perceived exertion. Participants reported lower arousal and lower perceived exertion when using

Restricted access

Vagner Deuel de Oliveira Tavares, Nicole Leite Galvão-Coelho, Joseph Firth, Simon Rosenbaum, Brendon Stubbs, Lee Smith, Davy Vancampfort, and Felipe Barreto Schuch

. Moderators of the exercise/feeling-state relationship: the influence of self-efficacy, baseline, and in-task feeling states at moderate- and high-intensity exercise . J Appl Soc Psychol . 2002 ; 32 ( 7 ): 1379 – 1395 . doi:10.1111/j.1559-1816.2002.tb01442.x 10.1111/j.1559-1816.2002.tb01442.x 47. East

Restricted access

John Cairney, Heather Clark, Dean Dudley, and Dean Kriellaars

, for example, knowledge, nor could we include other variables within specific domains (e.g., fun as an affective or feeling state, or confidence as a motivational variable). Although we acknowledge this as a limitation, the relative paucity of empirical research as to whether even a subset of domains

Restricted access

Kira L. Innes, Jeffrey D. Graham, and Steven R. Bray

) prior to each endurance handgrip trial. The Feeling Scale is a single-item scale to assess current feeling state. It is rated on an 11-point, bipolar scale ranging from −5 ( very bad ) to +5 ( very good ) at the scale endpoints and 0 ( neutral ) at the center point. Rating of Perceived Physical Exertion

Restricted access

Jeanette M. Ricci, Todd A. Astorino, Katharine D. Currie, and Karin A. Pfeiffer

the protocol duration. An additional research gap that must be addressed in future studies investigating various HIIE protocols in children is the assessment of children’s affective (ie, feeling state) and enjoyment responses given that perceptual responses are correlates of habitual PA and exercise