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Jeroen B.J. Smeets and Eli Brenner

Reaching out for an object is often described as consisting of two components that are based on different visual information. Information about the object's position and orientation guides the hand to the object, while information about the object's shape and size determines how the fingers move relative to the thumb to grasp it. We propose an alternative description, which consists of determining suitable positions on the object—on the basis of its shape, surface roughness, and so on—and then moving one's thumb and fingers more or less independently to these positions. We modeled this description using a minimum-jerk approach, whereby the finger and thumb approach their respective target positions approximately orthogonally to the surface. Our model predicts how experimental variables such as object size, movement speed, fragility, and required accuracy will influence the timing and size of the maximum aperture of the hand. An extensive review of experimental studies on grasping showed that the predicted influences correspond to human behavior.

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Jeroen B.J. Smeets and Eli Brenner

We agree with Robertson that our new view on grasping is a description of motor behavior rather than an exploration into the nature of the neural processing underlying this behavior. However, neurophysiologists might be inspired by our new view to ask other questions, perform other experiments, and analyze these differently. In this way, they could generate new insights about the neural control of grasping.

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Niranjan Chakrabhavi and Varadhan SKM

separately on IIs and SIs with factors being the wrist posture (neutral/extension/flexion), the direction of finger movement (flexion/extension), and the instructed fingers (index, middle, ring, and little). The data were checked for violations of sphericity, and Huynh–Feldt criterion was used to adjust

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Elizabeth L. Stegemöller, Joshua R. Tatz, Alison Warnecke, Paul Hibbing, Brandon Bates and Andrew Zaman

influence movement performance in persons with neurological disorders remain limited. Recent research has demonstrated that cued repetitive finger movement performance deteriorates in persons with PD at rates near to and above 120 beats per minute (bpm; Stegemöller, Allen, Simuni, & MacKinnon, 2010

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Mark Holten Mora-Jensen, Pascal Madeleine and Ernst Albin Hansen

fingers for playing music instruments more than 1 hr weekly. The participants were informed about the procedures of the study as well as the overall aim that was to broaden our knowledge on control of rhythmic finger movement. Still, the participants were not informed about specific aims and hypotheses of

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Tomoko Aoki, Hayato Tsuda and Hiroshi Kinoshita

movement and peak velocities of the finger movement during ascent and descent. In the passive single-finger tapping, the average and range of the nontapping finger force were calculated. The mean values of all parameters were computed on the basis of 10 taps performed by each subject under each of the

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Jumpei Mizuno, Masashi Kawamura and Minoru Hoshiyama

5 s followed by a feedback period for 5 s. Figure 1 —Visual presentation for the experiment during the OB or IM task. Visual presentation for a trial comprised of an initial instruction period, from −6 to −1 s; finger movement, from 0 to 5 s; and a feedback period for the OB task, after 5 s

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Laura Žlibinaitė, Rima Solianik, Daiva Vizbaraitė, Dalia Mickevičienė and Albertas Skurvydas

. Furthermore, it has been shown that finger-movement tracking performance in older adults improved after 8 weeks of aerobic training. 19 Thus, it can be expected that a combination of aerobic exercise and CR would improve performance in cognitive tasks and increase BDNF levels, which may lead to improvement

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Shohei Shibata, Yuki Inaba, Shinsuke Yoshioka and Senshi Fukashiro

summary, the timing of finger movement is a significant factor in achieving accurate ball release. To understand the mechanical function of the groups of upper limb muscles during ball throwing, the inverse dynamics method for calculating net joint torque, power, and work has been used ( Hirashima, Kudo

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Pai-Yun Cheng, Hsiao-Feng Chieh, Chien-Ju Lin, Hsiu-Yun Hsu, Jia-Jin J. Chen, Li-Chieh Kuo and Fong-Chin Su

.R. , Muthalib , M. , Perrey , S. , Galka , A. , Granert , O. , Wolff , S. , . . . Muthuraman , M. ( 2016 ). Effective connectivity of cortical sensorimotor networks during finger movement tasks: A simultaneous fNIRS, fMRI, EEG study . Brain Topography, 29 ( 5 ), 645 – 660 . PubMed ID: 27438589