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Fabiana Medeiros de Almeida Silva and Aldemir Smith Menezes

, Mouratidou T , Verbestel V , et al . Food Consumption and Screen-Based Sedentary Behaviors in European Adolescents . Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med . 2012 ; 166 ( 11 ): 1010 – 1020 . PubMed doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.646 10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.646 22945250 24. Boyland EJ , Halford JCG

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J.Ch. Leblanc, F. Le Gall, V. Grandjean and Ph. Verger

Young, French male athletes undergoing intensive elite sports training at the National Training Centre in Clairefontaine served as the subjects (N = 180; age range: 13 to 16 years) in a 3-year dietary survey aimed at characterizing their nutritional intake in terms of energy, macronutrients, calcium, and iron. Each year, the subjects were grouped by level into 3 promotions so that 9 groups could be studied. Dietary intake data were collected each year for each subject in the 9 groups, using a 5-day food record. The results showed that their total energy intake (TEI) was insufficient for athletes (ranging from 2352 ± 454 to 3395 ± 396 kcal/d as opposed to the recommended range of between 3819 and 5185 kcal/d). Furthermore, their diet was unbalanced, with too great an emphasis upon fatty foods (29.1 ± 2.8 to 34.1 ± 3.1% TEI vs. the 20% recommended), to the detriment of carbohydrates (48.5 ± 4.3 to 56.6 ± 3.1% TEI vs. the 55 to 60% recommended). The calcium intake was too low in 5 of the 9 groups while, in contrast, the iron intake was satisfactory in all groups. Furthermore, during this 3-year period at the Clairefontaine Centre, the subjects significantly (p < .05) improved their calcium and iron intakes (1021 ± 197 and 12 ± 2 mg/d in 1996, 1299 ± 155 and 16 ± 2 mg/d in 1997, and 1252 ± 184 and 17 ± 2 mg/d in 1998). This rise in micronutrient intakes may have been due to a physiological adaptation to growth or to the positive effects of courses on nutrition given during their stay at the Centre.

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Holly Wethington, Claudia Flowers, Michael Turner and Rita DiGioacchino DeBate

Focusing on female triathletes, this study was an exploration of behaviors and attitudes that may lead to disordered eating among female triathletes. One hundred and eighty-eight female triathletes residing in the U.S. completed an Internet-based questionnaire comprised of measures for disordered eating, body size distortion and dissatisfaction, and food consumption. Statistically significant relationships were identified regarding Preoccupation with Weight and Food Consumption (r= 0.52, p=0.005), Oral Control and Food Consumption (r= 0.32, p=0.04), and Food Restriction and Food Consumption (r= −0.30, p=0.04). Body Size Distortion was also significantly correlated to Food Consumption (r= −0.19, p=0.01), especially among the Sprint distance competitors (r= −0.21, p=0.02). Based upon the findings we suggest food restriction, body size distortion, and disordered eating attitudes are apparent among female triathletes, especially those who are club level athletes and short distance competitors.

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Julie Masurier, Marie-Eve Mathieu, Stephanie Nicole Fearnbach, Charlotte Cardenoux, Valérie Julian, Céline Lambert, Bruno Pereira, Martine Duclos, Yves Boirie and David Thivel

, compote, and a variety of fruits were the most commonly served food items). Food consumption was weighed and recorded by investigators (Bilnut 4.0 SCDA Nutrisoft software, Strasbourg, France) to calculate total EI during lunch. The proportion of the total EI derived from fat, carbohydrate, and protein was

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Grant M. Tinsley and Brett S. Nickerson

, LC: 47 ± 35 min; p  = .21). Although the macronutrient intake varied substantially between conditions (Table  1 ), the total mass of ingested food was similar (HC: 5.5 g/kg; LC: 5.3 g/kg). In both dietary conditions, acute food consumption artificially increased LST by approximately 1.5% ( p  < .001

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Anita Durksen, Shauna Downs, Rebecca Mollard, Laura Forbes, Geoff D.C. Ball and Jon McGavock

Background:

Physical activity interventions targeting weight status have yielded mixed results. This variability may be attributed to compensatory changes in dietary patterns after increasing physical activity (PA) levels. Therefore, we sought to determine whether dietary patterns varied with time spent in vigorous-intensity PA in youth.

Methods:

Cross-sectional analysis of 330 youth enrolled in a school-based prospective cohort in central Alberta. Physical activity was assessed with waist mounted accelerometers (Actical) worn for 7 days. Main outcomes included consumption of unhealthy foods and the unhealthy food index obtained from a validated web-based 24-hour dietary recall instrument. Secondary outcomes included macronutrient intake, food group (Canada’s Food Guide to Healthy Eating) intake, and diet quality.

Results:

Compared with youth participating in < 7 min/ day of vigorous physical activity, those achieving ≥ 7 min/day displayed no change in healthy or unhealthy food consumption. However, linear regression suggests a modest association between diet quality and vigorous-intensity PA.

Conclusion:

These data demonstrate that in this cohort of Canadian youth, time spent being physically active is associated with healthier dietary patterns and not with increased consumption of unhealthy foods.

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Catherine Draper, Susan Basset, Anniza de Villiers, Estelle V. Lambert and the HAKSA Writing Group

Background:

There is current concern for the health and well-being of children and youth in South Africa, including habits of physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior. The 2014 Healthy Active Kids South Africa Report Card evaluates the current activity status of children and youth.

Methods:

The Research Working Group was comprised of 23 experts in physical education, nutrition, sport science, public health and journalism. The search was based on a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature (previous 5 years), dissertations, and nonpeer-reviewed reports (‘gray’ literature) dealing with the PA and nutritional status of South African children and youth 6−18 years of age. Key indicators were identified and data extracted. Grades for each indicator were discussed and assigned.

Results:

Overall PA levels received a D grade, as roughly 50% or more of children and youth were not meeting recommended levels. Organized sports participation fared better with a C, and government policies were promising, receiving a B. Screen time and sedentary behavior were a major concern and received a grade of F. Under- and over-weight were highlighted, but overweight is on the rise and this indicator was assigned a D grade. Most of the other indicators in South Africa remained the same or became worse so that grades declined from C- to D. In particular, sedentary behavior, soft-drink and fast food consumption, and an ineffectual regulatory environment to control advertising to children were a concern. There is need to engage parents and communities for advocacy and social mobilization.

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Jan Seghers, Stijn De Baere, Maïté Verloigne and Greet Cardon

, Active Play, Active Transportation, Sedentary Behavior, Family and Peers, School, Community and Environment, Government, and Physical Fitness). The Report Card synthesized data from multiple sources to inform the 10 indicator grades. The Belgian Food Consumption Survey 3 (FCS) 2014-2015 conducted by

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Kapria-Jad Josaphat, Vicky Drapeau, David Thivel and Marie-Eve Mathieu

and Kawamura ( 1998 ), the human preference for sweet-tasting solutions is increased following a single bout of exercise. These changes in response to food consumption could lead to an alteration of food choices. For instance, sweet-taste liking has been linked to increased energy and carbohydrate

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Emily Borgundvaag, Michael McIsaac, Michael M. Borghese and Ian Janssen

education (high school or less, 2-y college, or 4-y university or higher), 18 annual family income (≤$50,000, $50,001–$100,000, or >$100,000), 18 the presence of a chronic health condition (yes or no), 23 BMI z score, 1 SBP z score, 1 the frequency of fast food consumption (rarely, 2–3 times per