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Diane E. Butterworth, David C. Nieman, Janice V. Butler, and Jodi L. Herring

A group of marathon runners (290 males, 54 females, mean age 39.7 ± 0.7 years) who participated in the Los Angeles Marathon recorded their food and fluid intake throughout a 3-day period, with the time of day denoted for each entry. Investigators coded each subject's food intake according to six time periods: 5:OO-8:59 a.m., 9:00-1059 a.m., 11:OO a.m.-1:59 p.m., 2:00-359 p.m., 4:0&7:59 p.m., and 8:00 p.m.459 a.m. The average intake of the runners consisted of 314 ± 6 g (52.3%) carbohydrates, 83.2 + 2.0 g (30.7%) fat, and 99.7 ± 2.3 g (16.5%) protein. Time periods for breakfast (13.7%), lunch (23.8%), and supper (34.0%) accounted for 71.5% of total caloric intake, with snack time periods contributing 28.5%. Breakfast calories were 68.9 ± 0.9% carbohydrate and 20.4 + 0.7% fat in contrast to supper calories, which were 47.7 ± 0.8% and 31.8 ± 0.6%, respectively. A sizable proportion of the daily caloric intake of recreational marathon runners is contributed by snacks and food intake after 4:00 p.m.

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Lore Metz, Laurie Isacco, Kristine Beaulieu, S. Nicole Fearnbach, Bruno Pereira, David Thivel, and Martine Duclos

curve for appetite feelings (i.e., hunger, prospective food consumption, and desire to eat). There was no difference due to the water temperature. Interestingly, this result indicates that cold immersed exercise does not necessarily increase subsequent food intake, as it has been previously suggested

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Julie Masurier, Marie-Eve Mathieu, Stephanie Nicole Fearnbach, Charlotte Cardenoux, Valérie Julian, Céline Lambert, Bruno Pereira, Martine Duclos, Yves Boirie, and David Thivel

 al., 2016c ). However, the potential role or exercise duration on the control of food intake and appetite sensations in children and adolescents has not been studied. In a study by Moore et al. ( 2004 ), 9- to 10-year-old healthy weight girls were asked to perform a 40-min (set at 75% of their maximal

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Antonio Paoli, Giuseppe Marcolin, Fabio Zonin, Marco Neri, Andrea Sivieri, and Quirico F. Pacelli

Exercise and nutrition are often used in combination to lose body fat and reduce weight. In this respect, exercise programs are as important as correct nutrition. Several issues are still controversial in this field, and among them there are contrasting reports on whether training in a fasting condition can enhance weight loss by stimulating lipolytic activity. The authors’ purpose was to verify differences in fat metabolism during training in fasting or feeding conditions. They compared the effect on oxygen consumption (VO2) and substrate utilization, estimated by the respiratory-exchange ratio (RER), in 8 healthy young men who performed the same moderate-intensity training session (36 min of cardiovascular training on treadmill at 65% maximum heart rate) in the morning in 2 tests in random sequence: FST test (fasting condition) without any food intake or FED test (feeding condition) after breakfast. In both cases, the same total amount and quality of food was assumed in the 24 hr after the training session. The breakfast, per se, increased both VO2 and RER significantly (4.21 vs. 3.74 and 0.96 vs. 0.84, respectively). Twelve hours after the training session, VO2 was still higher in the FED test, whereas RER was significantly lower in the FED test, indicating greater lipid utilization. The difference was still significant 24 hr after exercise. The authors conclude that when moderate endurance exercise is done to lose body fat, fasting before exercise does not enhance lipid utilization; rather, physical activity after a light meal is advisable.

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Ioná Zalcman Zimberg, Cibele Aparecida Crispim, Claudia Ridel Juzwiak, Hanna Karen Moreira Antunes, Ben Edwards, Jim Waterhouse, Sérgio Tufik, and Marco Túlio de Mello

The objective of the study was to describe the food intake of adventure racers during a competition simulated in the laboratory. Ten male athletes with international experience in adventure races took part in the study. The experiment lasted 67 hr (total distance covered 477.3 km), but 3 athletes did not finish the race. Food intake was recorded throughout the simulation. Athletes’ total energy expenditure was greater than their total energy intake (24,516 vs. 14,738 kcal), and the athletes obtained significantly more energy from food than from supplements. Carbohydrate intake was below the recommendation of 0.5–1.0 g · kg−1 · hr−1. These results indicate that guidelines for multiday adventure races are needed.

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Tammie R. Ebert, David T. Martin, Brian Stephens, Warren McDonald, and Robert T. Withers

Purpose:

To quantify the fluid and food consumed during a men’s and women’s professional road-cycling tour.

Methods:

Eight men (age 25 ± 5 y, body mass ± 7.4 kg, and height 177.4 ± 4.5 cm) and 6 women (age 26 ± 4 y, body mass ± 5.6 kg, and height 170.4 ± 5.2 cm) of the Australian Institute of Sport Road Cycling squads participated in the study. The men competed in the 6-d Tour Down Under (Adelaide, Australia), and the women, in the 10-d Tour De L’Aude (Aude, France). Body mass was recorded before and immediately after the race. Cyclists recalled the number of water bottles and amount of food they had consumed.

Results:

Men and women recorded body-mass losses of ~2 kg (2.8% body mass) and 1.5 kg (2.6% body mass), respectively, per stage during the long road races. Men had an average fluid intake of 1.0 L/h, whereas women only consumed on average 0.4 L/h. In addition, men consumed CHO at the rate suggested by dietitians (average CHO intake of 48 g/h), but again the women failed to reach recommendations, with an average intake of ~21 g/h during a road stage.

Conclusions:

Men appeared to drink and eat during racing in accordance with current nutritional recommendations, but women failed to reach these guidelines. Both men and women finished their races with a body-mass loss of ~2.6% to 2.8%. Further research is required to determine the impact of this loss on road-cycling performance and thermoregulation.

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Edith Filaire, Alain Massart, Jiewen Hua, and Christine Le Scanff

Purpose:

The aims of study were to examine the eating behaviors among 26 professional female tennis players and to assess the diurnal patterns of stress hormones through the measurement of awakening and diurnal profiles of salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) and cortisol concentrations.

Methods:

Eating behaviors were assessed through three questionnaires (Eating Attitudes Test-26; Eating Disorders Inventory 2; and Body Shape Questionnaire), food intake by a 7-day diet record, and menstrual status by questionnaire. Perceived stress scale and anxiety state were also evaluated. Saliva samples were collected at awakening, 30 min, 60 min, and 12 hr post awakening after 6-days’ rest.

Results:

Forty-six percent of tennis players presented Disordered Eating attitudes (DE) (n = 12) with a lower body mass index, and higher state anxiety as compared with the group without DE. No differences in the Perceived Stress Scale scores were noted. Mean energy intake, protein and carbohydrates intakes were lower (p > .05) in the DE group as compared with the group without DE. Although in both groups, sAA concentrations presented a decrease in the first 30 min after awakening, and then progressively rose toward the afternoon, DE players exhibited reduced concentrations of the sAA with a decrease in its overall day secretion. Moreover, they showed a higher overall day secretion of salivary cortisol and a higher Cortisol Awakening Response.

Conclusions:

These results suggest that the activity of the sympathetic nervous system is impaired whereas the cortisol awakening response is enhanced. The long-term consequences of these modifications on health remain to be elucidated.

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Kapria-Jad Josaphat, Élise Labonté-Lemoyne, Sylvain Sénécal, Pierre-Majorique Léger, and Marie-Eve Mathieu

alcohol or drugs 24 hours prior to the study. Participants were partly blinded to the experiment’s objectives since they were unaware that their food intake was monitored (see details below). This is a common procedure approved by the ethics committee. Verbal consent was obtained at the end of the study

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Mary K. Martin, David T. Martin, Gregory R. Collier, and Louise M. Burke

We estimated self-reported energy intake (EI) and cycling energy expenditure (CEE) during racing and training over 26 days (9 days recovery [REC], 9 days training [TRN], and 8 days racing [RACE], which included a 5-day stage race) for 8 members of the Australian National Training Squad [mean ± SD; 25.1 ± 4.0 years, 59.2 ± 4.4 kg, 3.74 ± 0.24 L · min−1 V̇O2peak, 13.6 ± 4.5 % Body fat (%Bfat)]. After 70 days of training and racing, average body mass increased by 1.1 kg (95%CI 0.5 to 1.7 kg; p < .01) and average %Bfat decreased by 0.9% (95%CI –1.7 to –0.1%; p < .05). These minor changes, however, were not considered clinically significant. CEE was different between RACE, TRN, and REC (2.15 ± 0.18 vs. 1.73 ± 0.25 vs. 0.72 ± 0.15 MJ · d−1, p < .05). Reported EI for RACE and TRN were higher than REC (14.87 ± 3.03, 13.70 ± 4.04 vs.11.98 ± 3.57 MJ · d−1, p < .05). Reported intake of carbohydrate for RACE and TRN were also higher than REC (588 ± 122, 536 ± 130 vs. 448 ± 138 g · d−1, p < .05). Reported intake of fat (59 ± 21–68 ± 21 g · d−1) was similar during RACE, TRN, and REC, whereas protein intake tended to be higher during TRN (158 ± 49 g · d−1) compared to RACE and REC (136 ± 33; 130 ± 33 g · d−1). There was a relationship between average CEE and average EI over the 26 days (r = 0.77, p < .05), but correlations between CEE and EI for each of the women varied (r =–0.02 to 0.67). There was a strong trend for an inverse relationship between average EI and %Bfat (r = –.68, p = .06, n = 8). In this study, increases in reported EI during heavy training and racing were the result of an increase in carbohydrate intake. Most but not all cyclists modulated EI based on CEE. Research is required to determine whether physiological or psychological factors are primarily responsible for the observed relationship between CEE and EI and also the inverse correlation between %Bfat and EI.

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Grzegorz Raczyński, Jan Czeczelewski, Maciej Skład, and Romuald Stupnicki

The aim of the study was to establish the relationships between energy intake and dietary quality with somatic variables and physical fitness. Energy intake and nutrition quality were assessed from 24-hr dietary recall questionnaires, and physical fitness was measured by applying the EUROFIT tests. Interrelationships between all those variables (simple, partial, and multiple correlation coefficients) were computed from standardized values. The somatic and physical fitness variables related more strongly on the nutrition quality than on the energy intake. Well-nourished children were taller, heavier, and more physically fit than the poorly nourished ones. We believe that dietary quality affected physical fitness indirectly by influencing somatic development. Energy intake did not contribute significantly to the total variance of the physical fitness factor.