Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 24 items for :

  • "functional health" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Fiona Barnett

Background:

This study examined the self-efficacy and affective responses to an acute exercise bout in sedentary older and younger women to determine whether aging has an effect on affective states.

Methods:

Twenty-five sedentary younger (mean age = 19.9 yrs) and 25 older (mean age = 55.7 yrs) women completed an acute bout of exercise. Affective responses were measured before, during, and immediately following exercise. Self-efficacy responses were measured before and immediately following exercise.

Results:

Positive engagement, revitalization, tranquility, Felt Arousal and Feeling Scale responses, and self-efficacy were all higher immediately following compared with before or during exercise for both groups of women. In addition, older women experienced higher overall positive engagement and lower physical exhaustion compared with younger women as well as higher tranquility and Feeling Scale responses immediately following exercise.

Conclusions:

This investigation found that an acute bout of moderate-intensity exercise produced more positive and fewer negative affective states in both younger and older women.

Restricted access

Mercedes Vélez-Toral, Débora Godoy-Izquierdo, Nicolás Mendoza Ladrón de Guevara, Carlos de Teresa Galván, Alberto Salamanca Ballesteros and Juan F. Godoy García

Background:

This study explored multidimensional outcomes that were derived from the adherence to regular exercise among previously sedentary postmenopausal 45 to 64 years old women who engaged in a ~20-week exercise program.

Methods:

A randomized controlled trial with between-group (intervention and control women) and within-subject measures (baseline, postintervention, and 3-month and 12-month follow-ups) was conducted. HRQoL and several indicators of cardio-metabolic status and fitness were assessed.

Results:

After the intervention, the participants experienced a positive change in their short and long-term physical and mental health, with significant enhancements in several HRQoL dimensions, particularly mental well-being (23.3% of change) and menopause-related health and subdomains (17.0% of change) (P < .01). Improvements were maintained or continued (eg, mental well-being) overtime. These outcomes were accompanied by significant improvements in cardio-metabolic status and fitness, including weight, BMI, cardio-respiratory fitness and flexibility (up to 16.2% of change, P < .05). After the intervention, the intervention group exhibited better HRQoL than the control group at each of the measurement phases. Between-group differences were also observed for some indicators of cardiovascular health and flexibility.

Conclusions:

Our findings add evidence on the association of positive outcomes on HRQoL with improvements in cardio-metabolic health and fitness status after the adoption of an active lifestyle.

Restricted access

Kristin M. Mills, Scott Sadler, Karen Peterson and Lorrin Pang

Background: Falls in the elderly represent a public health crisis. Effective prevention programs need to conduct economic analyses. The Move With Balance program showed a 65% reduction in falls in institutionalized elderly. Methods: We evaluated the return on investment (ROI) of Move With Balance. We calculated the ROI for 2 situations: first, using data from the current study (N = 27); second, extrapolating the data to an “intended” annual program (N = 45) where training costs can be spread over 6 years. Results: The program costs for the current study was $11,143. Based on an efficacy rate of 65%, we estimated that 13 falls were averted among the 21 participants in the treatment group. At a cost of $1440/fall, total averted cost of falls was $18,720. The ROI was 1.7:1 for a 10-week period. Program effects persisted for at least 6 months. Extrapolating the current program costs and fall rates to include classes for 45 people twice a year, the annual program costs would be $27,217. Total annual averted cost of falls would be $208,594. The annual ROI in this group would be 7.6:1. Conclusions: Move With Balance not only is efficacious in reducing falls in institutionalized elderly but also has a positive ROI.

Restricted access

Christy Haley and Ross Andel

The authors examined factors related to participation in walking, gardening or yard work, and sports or exercise in 686 community-dwelling adults 60–95 years of age from Wave IV of the population-based Americans’ Changing Lives Study. Logistic regression revealed that male gender, being married, and better functional health were associated with greater likelihood of participating in gardening or yard work (p < .05). Male gender, better functional health, and lower body-mass index were independently associated with greater likelihood of walking (p < .05). Increasing age, male gender, higher education, and better functional health were associated with greater likelihood of participating in sports or exercise (p < .05). Subsequent analyses yielded an interaction of functional health by gender in sport or exercise participation (p = .06), suggesting a greater association between functional health and participation in men. Gender and functional health appear to be particularly important for physical activity participation, which may be useful in guiding future research. Attention to different subgroups may be needed to promote participation in specific activities.

Restricted access

Ann-Kristin Beyer, Maja Wiest and Susanne Wurm

.g.,  Wurm et al., 2010 ). Covariates All analyses were controlled for participants’ gender, partner status, education level, as well as physical and functional health status at baseline because lower education levels, poor health, and living alone have all been linked with less physical activity (e

Restricted access

Natalie Kružliaková, Paul A. Estabrooks, Wen You, Valisa Hedrick, Kathleen Porter, Michaela Kiernan and Jamie Zoellner

RJ , Piantadosi C , Ettridge K , et al . Functional health literacy mediates the relationship between socio-economic status, perceptions and lifestyle behaviors related to cancer risk in an Australian population . Patient Educ Couns . 2013 ; 91 ( 2 ): 206 – 212 . PubMed doi:10.1016/j

Full access

Sheri J. Hartman, Dori Pekmezi, Shira I. Dunsiger and Bess H. Marcus

Functional Health Literacy in Adults), and self-reported insufficient physical activity (defined as reporting less than 60 min/wk of moderate to vigorous physical activity [MVPA] on the 7-Day Physical Activity Recall). Additional eligibility included 18 to 65 years of age, body mass index (BMI) < 45 kg/m 2

Restricted access

Curtis Kindel and John Challis

variability influences the variation in force fluctuations across the working range of a hand muscle . J Neurophysiol . 2005 ; 93 : 2449 – 2459 . PubMed doi:10.1152/jn.01122.2004 10.1152/jn.01122.2004 15. Lipsitz LA . Dynamics of stability: the physiologic basis of functional health and frailty . J

Restricted access

Christopher K. Rhea, Jed A. Diekfuss, Jeffrey T. Fairbrother and Louisa D. Raisbeck

Parkinson’s disease who have a fall history . Physiotherapy, 91 ( 3 ), 152 – 158 . doi:10.1016/j.physio.2004.11.010 10.1016/j.physio.2004.11.010 Lipsitz , L.A. ( 2002 ). Dynamics of stability: The physiologic basis of functional health and frailty . The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological

Restricted access

Natasha Reid, Justin W. Keogh, Paul Swinton, Paul A. Gardiner and Timothy R. Henwood

, cognitive, physical, and functional health among older adults in retirement communities . The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 71 ( 1 ), 78 – 83 . PubMed ID: 26273024 doi:10.1093/gerona/glv103 10.1093/gerona/glv103 Saka , B. , Kaya , O. , Ozturk , G