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Jennifer M. Medina McKeon, Craig R. Denegar and Jay Hertel

The purpose of this study was to formulate a predictive equation to discriminate males from females using static and dynamic lower extremity (LE) alignments. Twenty-four healthy adults volunteered to participate. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to assess the kinematics of the right hip and knee during two functional tasks. Six measures of static LE alignment were also performed. Statistical comparisons were made between males and females for all variables. Static and dynamic variables that were significantly different by sex were entered into separate discriminant analyses for each task. The resulting equations were each able to correctly predict 87% of the subjects by sex. Fifty-eight percent and 55% of the variance was explained by sex for the vertical jump and plant & jump, respectively. The frontal plane hip angle was the best predictor of sex for both tasks. While there were statistically significant differences between the sexes for static measures of LE alignment, kinematic measures were better at discriminating between sexes.

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Angelica E. Lang, Soo Y. Kim, Stephan Milosavljevic and Clark R. Dickerson

in muscle force predictions between breast cancer survivors, with and without impingement pain, and noncancer controls during arm-focused functional task performance. The ability of the Shoulder Loading Analysis Modules (SLAM) to predict muscle forces in these functional tasks, utilizing measured

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Renata V. Pedroso, Carlos Ayán, Francisco J. Fraga, Thays M.V. da Silva, José M. Cancela and Ruth F. Santos-Galduròz

. In this context, functional-task training could be regarded as an even more promising method for patients with AD because it stimulates the same motor components through mimicked movements used in everyday tasks, for example, standing up from a sitting position, climbing stairs, doing step

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Lindsey Tulipani, Mark G. Boocock, Karen V. Lomond, Mahmoud El-Gohary, Duncan A. Reid and Sharon M. Henry

Physical therapists (PTs) rely on qualitative observations in the clinic as the most common method of evaluating a patient’s form and movement patterns during functional tasks. PTs are frequently limited by the equipment and time available to conduct complex biomechanical assessments. 1 Patients

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Anthony C. Santago II, Meghan E. Vidt, Xiaotong Li, Christopher J. Tuohy, Gary G. Poehling, Michael T. Freehill and Katherine R. Saul

occupational study analyzing aging effects on upper extremity fatigue during light assembly work found no differences in average strength requirements between young and older adults for shoulder abduction/adduction or flexion/extension strength. 12 Strength requirements for functional tasks relevant to

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Neal R. Glaviano, Ashley N. Marshall, L. Colby Mangum, Joseph M. Hart, Jay Hertel, Shawn Russell and Susan Saliba

variety of functional tasks, such as squatting and stair ambulation. This pain has been linked to a decrease in activity level, 4 decreased quality of life, 5 and long-term consequences following the initial diagnosis. 6 , 7 While the etiology is unknown, a multitude of neuromuscular impairments have

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Revay O. Corbett, Tyler R. Keith and Jay Hertel

the IdFAI and the CAIT do little to help understand how much confidence an athlete may have in their ankle when RTP following an ankle sprain as they do not gather information about a patient’s perceived instability while performing functional tasks. Perceived instability is an important entity in the

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James A. Yaggie and Stephen J. Kinzey

Context:

Ankle bracing has been used for many years in an attempt to prevent lateral ligamentous injuries of the ankle by restricting joint range of motion (ROM).

Objective:

To examine the influence of ankle bracing on ROM and sport-related performance.

Design:

Repeated measures.

Setting:

Biomechanics laboratory.

Participants:

30 volunteers. None reported ankle trauma within 2 years preceding the study or had other orthopedic conditions that would have affected physical performance.

Intervention:

Three brace conditions (McDavid A101™, Perform-8™ Lateral Stabilizer) were assessed during performance of the vertical jump and shuttle run.

Main Outcome Measures:

shuttle-run time, vertical jump height, inversion, and plantar flexion ROM.

Results:

Both braces restricted plantar flexion and inversion ROM and caused no change in shuttle-run time or vertical jump height.

Conclusions:

Our results indicate that bracing the ankle joint increases external lateral support to the joint without significantly restricting functional ability.

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Stephen J. Kinzey, Mitchell L. Cordova, Kevin J. Gallen, Jason C. Smith and Justin B. Moore

Objective:

To determine whether a standard 20-min ice-bath (10°C) immersion of the leg alters vertical ground-reaction-force components during a 1 -legged vertical jump.

Design:

A 1 × 5 factorial repeated-measures model was used.

Setting:

The Applied Biomechanics Laboratory at The University of Mississippi.

Participants:

Fifteen healthy and physically active subjects (age = 22.3 ± 2.1 years, height = 177.3 ± 12.2 cm, mass = 76.3 ± 19.1 kg) participated.

Intervention:

Subjects performed 25 one-legged vertical jumps with their preferred extremity before (5 jumps) and after (20 jumps) a 20-min cold whirlpool to the leg. The 25 jumps were reduced into 5 sets of average trials.

Main Outcome Measures:

Normalized peak and average vertical ground-reaction forces, as well as vertical impulse obtained using an instrumented force platform.

Results:

Immediately after cryotherapy (sets 2 and 3), vertical impulse decreased (P = .01); peak vertical ground-reaction force increased (set 2) but then decreased toward baseline measures (P= .02). Average vertical ground-reaction force remained unchanged (P >.05).

Conclusions:

The authors advocate waiting approximately 15 min before engaging in activities that require the production of weight-bearing explosive strength or power.

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Howard J. Hillstrom, Rohit Garg, Andrew Kraszewski, Mark Lenhoff, Timothy Carter, Sherry I. Backus, Aviva Wolff, Grigory Syrkin, Richard Cheng and Scott W. Wolfe

The purpose of this study was to develop a three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis based anatomical wrist joint coordinate system for measurement of in-vivo wrist kinematics. The convergent validity and reliability of the 3D motion analysis implementation was quantified and compared with manual and electrogoniometry techniques on 10 cadaveric specimens. Fluoroscopic measurements were used as the reference. The 3D motion analysis measurements (mean absolute difference [MAD] = 3.6°) were significantly less different (P < .005) than manual goniometry (MAD = 5.7°) but not (P = .066, power = 0.45) electrogoniometry (MAD = 5.0°) compared with fluoroscopy. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC[2,1]) was highest for 3D motion analysis compared with manual and electrogoniometry, suggesting better reliability for this technique. To demonstrate the utility of this new wrist joint coordinate system, normative data from 10 healthy subjects was obtained while throwing a dart.