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Sherry L. Folsom-Meek and Terry L. Rizzo

The purpose of this study was to assess validity and reliability of the Physical Educators’ Attitude Toward Teaching Individuals with Disabilities III (PEATID III; Rizzo, 1993) for future professionals. Participants (N = 3,464) were undergraduate students enrolled in the introductory adapted physical education course at 235 colleges and universities. Construct validity was obtained through principal components analysis with oblique rotation and supported by principal components analysis with varimax rotation. Results showed that PEATID III measures three factors: (a) outcomes of teaching students with disabilities in regular classes, (b) effects on student learning, and (c) need for more academic preparation to teach students with disabilities. Reliability, as estimated through coefficient alpha, was .88 for the total scale and .71 or greater for each of the disability subscales.

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Suri Duitch

, not only because of changing technology. How can educators possibly feel equal to the challenge of preparing future professionals for long and successful careers at a time of such massive transition and upheaval? These challenges are before the field of kinesiology at least as much as other fields. As

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Pamela Beach, Melanie Perreault, and Leapetswe Malete

experiences, including not only international travel but also through virtual exchange. International experiences improve students’ global competencies as well as sharpen a wide variety of career readiness competencies. Expanding one’s views to a more global scale prepares future professionals to solve a wide

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Diane L. Gill

academia, particularly at major research universities, merit and promotion are typically based on data-based (ideally, funded) research papers in high-impact journals. Review chapters and texts receive less credit, although they often reach more professionals and future professionals than the articles in

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Karen S. Meaney, Ting Liu, and Lara M. Duke

The rapidly increasing enrollment in kinesiology programs recognizes the important role of our academic discipline in promoting future professionals within the physical activity, fitness, wellness, education, sport, and allied health domains. Unprecedented growth in student interest in kinesiology offers faculty and administrators in higher education both exciting opportunities and difficult challenges. One significant concern facing kinesiology faculty is maintaining high-quality instruction within growing class sizes. Incorporating service-learning components within kinesiology curricula provides numerous benefits to students, faculty, institutions of higher education, and members of our local and global communities. In addition, service-learning has the potential to initiate innovative and entrepreneurial learning experiences and funding opportunities for students and faculty.

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Rosalind Chonise Gregory-Bass, Richard H. Williams, Bridget A. Peters, and Asherah N. Blount

Diversity and inclusion in Kinesiology is needed to ensure the future professionals of tomorrow engage in recognizing the shared fabric of science and inquiry. Initiatives targeting inclusion and diversity have shown promise in bridging the existing gap. Vital to this process is the role of faculty, administrators and students in providing academic support and paracurricular exposure to the field of Kinesiology. Historical perspectives and knowledge of best practices shape the conversation regarding innovative 21st century options deemed necessary for meeting this challenge. Our review describes programs that strengthen the preparedness of undergraduate students. In addition, we outline existing strategies leading to effective partnerships between undergraduate and graduate institutions. Diversity and inclusion are integral to the achievement of excellence and enhance each institution's ability to accomplish its academic mission and to serve its constituents.

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Urban Johnson and Mark Andersen

The field of sport and exercise psychology (SEP) has experienced a steady growth, and the professional practice and training of students has evolved over that time. Based on 2 past studies, the purpose was to describe a 2015 cohort of SEP students’ hopes, dreams, and worries about the future. The authors performed a thematic content analysis of essays from undergraduate students based on cohorts from 1995, 2005, and 2015. The results showed that the most recent students expressed more worries about the current situation in relation to perceptions about the future of their potential professional practice than the past groups. Four tendencies for the future emerged: continued development of applied sport psychology, increased interdisciplinary exchange and integration, inclusion of exercise and health as a vital part of the field, and increased acceptance of cultural variations. Implications for future professional practice and training in SEP are discussed.

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Claudia Emes, Patti Longmuir, and Peter Downs

Adapted physical activity professionals have embraced for some time the concept of a nonmedical model; however, traditional approaches in service delivery continue to exist. Abilities-based is not a model for service delivery; it is an approach that offers a new perspective that is based on person-centerdness, openness, and compatibility. The focus is on the person in a learning situation, not the disability, not the activity, and not the environment. Although these factors cannot be ignored, emphasis in an ability-based approach shifts to the person. Attitude within and toward service delivery is the critical point of departure in the abilities-based approach. This article discusses demystifying disability and building positive attitudes as features of this approach. It then discusses the influence of this approach on how we prepare future professionals of adapted physical activity, and it concludes with an example of an abilities-based program.

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Elizabeth A. Taylor, Gareth J. Jones, Kristy McCray, and Robin Hardin

The sport industry is ripe for issues of sexual harassment/assault due to the high value placed on masculine characteristics and the power differential between male leaders/coaches and female subordinates/athletes. This culture permeates sport organizations, as issues of sexual harassment/assault committed by athletes and coaches/administrators are commonplace and have recently been mishandled, raising questions about effective education. This study examined the relationship between education on sexual harassment/assault and the endorsement of rape myths by sport management students. Results indicate that training on sexual harassment/assault in sport management classrooms is low and is potentially ineffective at curbing rape myth acceptance, suggesting current curricula are insufficient. These findings have both theoretical and practical contributions related to how sport management departments can prepare future professionals to change the culture of sport.

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Michel Milistetd, Pierre Trudel, Isabel Mesquita, and Juarez Vieira do Nascimento

In Brazil, contrary to the situation in many countries, sport coaching at all levels is considered a profession. Following a law passed by the government, those who want to coach are required to earn a university diploma called a ‘Bachelor in Physical Education’. This bachelor’s degree prepares future professionals to work in any of the following areas: health, leisure, and sport performance. Because universities have some fexibility regarding the courses that they offer and can also focus on one or any combination of the three aforementioned areas, we cannot assume that graduate students have acquired the same knowledge and developed the same competencies. Therefore, a broad inquiry of what is provided by different universities was needed to create a picture of the curriculum that future sport coaches will experience. In an effort to situate the Brazilian coaching and coach education system within a worldwide perspective, the data collected are interpreted using the International Sport Coaching Framework (ISCF).