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Susan Lagaert, Mieke Van Houtte and Henk Roose

first year of secondary education ( M age  = 12.18). Drawing on gender identity theory ( Egan & Perry, 2001 ), the “doing gender”-perspective ( West & Zimmerman, 1987 ), Risman’s ideas on gender as a social structure ( Risman & Davis, 2013 ) and the sociology of childhood perspective ( James, 2009

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George B. Cunningham, Erin Buzuvis and Chris Mosier

). Although the bills varied slightly, they all sought to restrict access to the facility one could use—whether a restroom, locker room, or a similar facility—based on that person’s sex assigned at birth. As transgender individuals’ sex assigned at birth differs from their gender identity and/or gender

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Justin A. Haegele and T. Nicole Kirk

focused on the influence that having a disability has had on participants’ experiential perspectives and have ignored addressing interrelationships with other forms of difference (e.g., gender identity, race/ethnicity). For example, it is reasonable to suggest that the embodied experiences of individuals

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Katherine Dashper

In this autoethnography I explore how my responses to a horse-riding injury to my face and teeth illustrate some of the complex interactions between gender identity and sporting identity. This facial injury left me feeling vulnerable and uncomfortable with my appearance, and prompted me to reflect on the ways sporting participation and injury are both constrained by and constitutive of gender identity.

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Shannon S. C. Herrick and Lindsay R. Duncan

It is well documented that individuals with minority sexual orientations and minority gender identities [ie, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, etc (LGBTQ+)] experience discrimination, stigmatization, and marginalization on a variety of institutional and personal levels. 1 , 2 The

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Heather Sykes

This article examines developments in gender policies in sport in relation to recent changes in transsexual rights legislation and gender identity activism. The Gay Games has developed a gender identity policy about “men, women, transgender and intersex” athletes. In 2004, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) introduced the Stockholm Consensus on sex reassignment surgery to allow “transsexual” athletes to compete at the Olympics. These developments do not indicate an overall increase in the acceptance of gender variance in the world of sport; rather, there has been ongoing resistance to inclusive gender policies in mainstream sport organizations. I argue this resistance is based on anxieties about the instability of the male/female gender binary and the emergence of queer gender subjectivities within women’s, gay, and mainstream sporting communities.

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Brent Douglas McDonald

This article is based on a larger ethnographic project that examines the construction of gendered identity within a Japanese men’s rowing club. For members, notions of masculinity and Japanese identity converge to the point of naturalization. The embodied experience of being a rower is underpinned by the cultural artifacts of hierarchy, social positioning, and group membership. Membership in university rowing clubs somatizes and naturalizes the valued characteristics associated with salary-man identity (duty, loyalty, self-sacrifice, mental and physical endurance) to the point of common sense. The resultant masculine identity is congruent with forms of hegemonic masculinity that are critical for successful employment in company-centered Japan.

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Jeffrey L. Kidder

Parkour is a new, and increasingly popular, sport in which individuals athletically and artistically negotiate obstacles found in the urban environment. In this article, I position parkour as a performance of masculinity involving spatial appropriation. Through ethnographic data I show how young men involved in the sport use the city (both the built environment and the people within it) as a structural resource for the construction and maintenance of gender identities. The focus of my research highlights the performance of gender as a spatialized process.

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Elizabeth A. Baiocchi-Wagner and Elizabeth Behm-Morawitz

Attempts at investigating female sports reporters’ credibility and persuasiveness from the audience’s perspective are limited and outdated. This study, grounded in social identity theory, fills the gap in media literature. A quasi-experiment tested respondents’ perceptions of male and female sports reporters’ credibility and persuasiveness as a function of salient gender identity and reporter and athlete sex. Respondents’ sports fandom, frequency of sports-media usage, and general perceptions of news-media credibility also were examined. Results of a MANOVA indicated no significant differences in respondents’ perceptions of a male and female reporter, even when controlling for respondent gender; however, sports fandom and general perceptions of news-media credibility did have a significant impact on perceptions.