Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for :

  • "glucose feeding" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Dennis van Hamont, Christopher R. Harvey, Denis Massicotte, Russell Frew, François Peronnet and Nancy J. Rehrer

Effects of feeding glucose on substrate metabolism during cycling were studied. Trained (60.0 ± 1.9 mL · kg−1 · min−1) males (N = 5) completed two 75 min, 80% VO2max trials: 125 g 13C-glucose (CHO); 13C-glucose tracer, 10 g (C). During warm-up (30 min 30% VO2max) 2 ⋅ 2 g 13C-glucose was given as bicarbonate pool primer. Breath samples and blood glucose were analyzed for 13C/ 12C with IRMS. Protein oxidation was estimated from urine and sweat urea. Indirect calorimetry (protein corrected) and 13C/ 12C enrichment in expired CO2 and blood glucose allowed exogenous (Gexo), endogenous (Gendo), muscle (Gmuscle), and liver glucose oxidation calculations. During exercise (75 min) in CHO versus C (respectively): protein oxidation was lower (6.8 ± 2.7, 18.8 ± 5.9 g; P = 0.01); Gendo was reduced (71.2 ± 3.8, 80.7 ± 5.7%; P = 0.01); Gmuscle was reduced (55.3 ± 6.1, 65.9 ± 6.0%; P = 0.01) compensated by increased Gexo (58.3 ± 2.1, 3.87 ± 0.85 g; P = 0.000002). Glucose ingestion during exercise can spare endogenous protein and carbohydrate, in fed cyclists, without gly-cogen depletion.

Restricted access

Mahmoud S. El-Sayed, Angelheart J.M. Rattu and Ian Roberts

The study examined the effect of carbohydrate ingestion on exercise performance capacity. Nine male cyclists performed two separate trials at 70% VO2max for 60 min followed by a maximal ride for 10 min. During trials subjects were fed either an 8% glucose solution (CHO) or a placebo solution (PL), which were administered at rest and during and immediately after submaximal exercise. Statistical analyses indicated that glucose levels at rest increased significantly 15 min after the ingestion of CHO compared to PL. At 30 and 60 min during submaximal exercise, plasma glucose levels decreased significantly in the CHO but not in the PL trial. Following the performance ride, glucose levels increased significantly only during the CHO test trial. Free fatty acids did not change significantly during testing trials. The maximal performance ride results showed that in the CHO trial, a significantly greater external work load was accomplished compared to the PL trial. It is concluded that CHO ingestion improves maximal exercise performance after prolonged exercise.

Restricted access

Gareth J. Smith, Edward C. Rhodes and Robert H. Langill

The purpose of this study was to determine if pre-exercise glucose ingestion would improve distance swimming performance. Additionally, pre-exercise glucose was provided at 2 different feeding intervals to investigate the affects of the timing of administration. Ten male triathletes (X¯±SD: age, 29.5 ± 5.0 years; V̇O2peak, 48.8 ± 3.2 ml · kg’1 · min’) swam 4000 m on 3 occasions following the consumption of either a 10% glucose solution 5 min prior to exercise (G5), a 10% glucose solution 35 min prior to exercise (G35), or a similar volume of placebo (PL). Despite a significant difference (p < ,01) in blood glucose concentration prior to exercise (X¯±SD in mmol · L ’: G" 8.4 ± 1.1 vs. G5 5.2 ± 0.5 or PL 5.3 ± 0.4), no significant differences were observed in total time (X¯±SD in minutes: G* 70.7 ± 7.6, Gs 70.1 ± 7.6. PL 71.9 ± 8.4). post-exercise blood glucose (X¯±SD inmmol · L−1: G35 5.1 ± 1.1, G5 5.1 ± 0.9, PL 5.3 ± 0.4), and average heart rate (X¯±SD in bpnv.G" 155.8±10.8, G5 153.6±12.6. PL 152.0± 12.5; p > .05). While not reaching statistical significance, glucose feedings did result in improved individual performance times, ranging from 24 s to 5 min in 8 of the 10 subjects compared to the placebo. These results were found despite significant differences in blood glucose between trials immediately prior to exercise.