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Patty Freedson, David M. Buchner, Russ Pate, Brad Hatfield, Loretta DiPietro, David A. Dzewaltowski, Tim Gavin and Jeff Nessler

This paper provides an overview of several university programs that have integrated various aspects of public health into their kinesiology instruction, research, and outreach efforts. The summaries of these programs provide the historical context that shows the various stages of transformation of their kinesiology and exercise science programs over the last century. Examples of specific academic structural designs and curricula are described, as well as the rationale the faculty used to justify these programs. In addition, advantages, opportunities, and challenges of this integration are highlighted.

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Karen Lux Gaudreault, K. Andrew R. Richards, Kelly Simonton and Angela Simonton

graduate programs, particularly at the master’s degree level, is limited. That research which does exist highlights the potential for master’s degrees to both support the development of more innovative orientations among in-service teachers ( O’Bryant et al., 2000 ) and to help others feel more prepared

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Jana L. Fogaca, Jack C. Watson II and Sam J. Zizzi

shadowing experiences. Although shadowing is a common practice in graduate programs, sport psychology researchers have not investigated its effectiveness in the past. In the present sample, students who had this experience appreciated their learning and demonstrated increased self-awareness and awareness of

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Meg G. Hancock, Lindsey Darvin and Nefertiti A. Walker

In 2009, it was estimated that there were more than 300 sport management undergraduate and graduate programs across the United States ( King, 2009 ). That number had grown to more than 640 sport management programs in 2016 (North American Society for Sport Management [ NASSM, 2016 ]), representing

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Judy L. Van Raalte, Terry D. Brown, Britton W. Brewer, Joshua B. Avondoglio, Whitney M. Hartmann and Carrie B. Scherzer

The purpose of this research was to compile and evaluate the course offerings of sport psychology graduate programs with regard to the requirements for becoming a Certified Consultant, Association for the Advancement of Applied Sport Psychology (AAASP). Course offerings of 79 programs were identified via the on-line version of the College Catalogue Collections of the Career Guidance Foundation. Course descriptions in physical education/exereise science and psychology departments were examined to determine whether they fell within the AAASP certification criteria areas. Most of the schools evaluated did not offer courses in all 12 areas required for AAASP certification. Several programs offered courses in as few as six of the required areas. The results of this study suggest that the majority of graduate programs in applied sport psychology do not offer the necessary courses for students interested in pursuing AAASP certification.

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Mark B. Andersen, Judy L. Van Raalte and Britton W. Brewer

To assess the supervisory skills of sport psychologists who are training future practitioners, the Sport Psychology Supervisory Skills Inventory (SPSSI) was mailed to 201 potential applied sport psychology supervisors. Supervisors were associated with graduate programs that offered applied sport psychology practica and/or internships, as identified in the Directory of Graduate Programs in Applied Sport Psychology (Sachs, Burke, & Salitsky, 1992). Supervisors rated themselves on 41 supervisory skills. The SPSSI was also mailed to 416 student members of AAASP, who were asked to rate their supervisors. There was a 35% return rate from supervisors and a 45% return rate from students. The findings suggest that supervised experience with athletes is limited for both supervisors and graduate students.

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Susan C. Brown

This study sought to identify significant predictors of success (a) in a graduate program of sport management at a major research institution in the United States and (b) in initial employment success. Regression analysis identified four significant predictors for success in the graduate program. The variables that produced a positive relationship with the dependent variable—final graduate grade point average—were age upon application, number of years of extracurricular activity involvement in undergraduate school, and undergraduate grade point average. The number of years in a full-time position in sport management upon application produced a significant negative relationship. Discriminant analysis was used to identify possible predictors of initial employment success identified as time from graduation to employment in a sport management position. However, no significant predictors were found.

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Erik K.M. Kjeldsen

This study utilized alumni of one sport management graduate program in an effort to investigate career paths in sport management. A representative sample of 126 alumni was selected from a population of 251 students who had graduated over a 10-year period. A total of 69 usable returns were received, for a response rate of 54.8%. Specific points during the professional, preparation period and during the working career were examined as benchmarks in the career path. The number of alumni maintaining jobs in the field at each benchmark shed light on career retention and on the factors contributing to attrition. The five benchmarks selected were entry into the graduate program, exit from the program, the internship, first job, and final job. Salary at each job level and satisfaction were measured in an effort to better understand the nature of a sport management career. The analysis was differentiated by sex and by the various subfields in the sport management profession.

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John M. Dunn

An historical view of the life and contributions of Hollis Francis Fait to the field of special physical education is presented in this article. Dr. Fait’s childhood, education, and early career are explored as well as his success in developing at the University of Connecticut one of the first graduate programs to train physical educators to work with the handicapped. Dr. Fait’s perspectives on athletics, administration, minorities, and scholarship are described. His belief in the need for concise language and clarity of thought demonstrated in his own scholarship is discussed.

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Gonzalo A. Bravo, Doyeon Won and Mauricio Ferreira

Trade-offs in consumer choice become central to understanding how choice actually occurs. This study examines the trade-offs sport management students are willing to make in order to select the program of their choice. Sport management undergraduate students (N = 498) participated in a full-profile conjoint experiment asking them to rate 18 program-choice scenarios resulted from the factorial design of seven attributes and nineteen levels. Results at the aggregated level indicated that program environment was the most important attribute in choosing a sport management graduate program, followed by program reputation, graduate assistantship, cost/tuition, NCAA affiliation, program length, and location. Given these results, a sensitivity analysis illustrated that students were willing to make trade-offs among program characteristics, particularly pay more for a program with better reputation. Results from the current study are valuable and informative for sport management programs for setting market boundaries and selecting what to promote when advertising to attract prospective students.