Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 369 items for :

  • "happiness" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Does Spectatorship Increase Happiness? The Energy Perspective

Wonseok Jang, Yong Jae Ko, Daniel L. Wann, and Daehwan Kim

The pursuit of happiness is an important human endeavor, and scholars have found that happiness is beneficial in many ways ( Van Boven & Gilovich, 2003 ). For example, relative to unhappy people, happy individuals are more likely to report marital satisfaction and enjoy friendships, tend to live

Restricted access

Emotions and Sport Performance: An Exploration of Happiness, Hope, and Anger

Tim Woodman, Paul A. Davis, Lew Hardy, Nichola Callow, Ian Glasscock, and Jason Yuill-Proctor

We conducted three experiments to examine the relationships between emotions and subcomponents of performance. Experiment 1 revealed that anger was associated with enhanced gross muscular peak force performance but that happiness did not influence grammatical reasoning performance. Following Lazarus (1991, 2000a), we examined hope rather than happiness in Experiment 2. As hypothesized, hope yielded faster soccer-related reaction times in soccer players. Experiment 3 was an examination of extraversion as a moderator of the anger-performance relationship. When angry, extraverts’ peak force increased more than introverts’. Results are discussed and future research directions are offered in relation to Lazarus’s framework.

Restricted access

The Influence of Self-Generated Emotions on Physical Performance: An Investigation of Happiness, Anger, Anxiety, and Sadness

Marco Rathschlag and Daniel Memmert

The present study examined the relationship between self-generated emotions and physical performance. All participants took part in five emotion induction conditions (happiness, anger, anxiety, sadness, and an emotion-neutral state) and we investigated their influence on the force of the finger musculature (Experiment 1), the jump height of a counter-movement jump (Experiment 2), and the velocity of a thrown ball (Experiment 3). All experiments showed that participants could produce significantly better physical performances when recalling anger or happiness emotions in contrast to the emotion-neutral state. Experiments 1 and 2 also revealed that physical performance in the anger and the happiness conditions was significantly enhanced compared with the anxiety and the sadness conditions. Results are discussed in relation to the Lazarus (1991a, 2000a) cognitive-motivational-relational (CMR) theory framework.

Restricted access

Predicting Happiness in Paralympic Swimming Medalists

Jeffrey Martin, Mario Vassallo, Jacklyn Carrico, and Ellen Armstrong

). For instance, determining that personal performance standards such as racing a fast time, irrespective of outcome, is important to athlete’s happiness is knowledge that might help persuade coaches to focus on controllable performance variables and less on uncontrollable goals such as the outcome

Restricted access

Different Levels of Leisure Walking and Mental Health Among Older Adults With Mild Cognitive Impairment

Jungjoo Lee, Seok Min Oh, Jaehyun Kim, and Junhyoung Kim

; Ribe & Lovestone, 2016 ). Older adults experiencing MCI have reported diminished levels of life satisfaction and happiness (Kim et al., 2022; Kottl et al., 2020 ) and increased levels of loneliness and stress ( Koyanagi et al., 2019 ; Yu et al., 2016 ) compared with people not experiencing MCI. Thus

Restricted access

The Effects of Implicit Team Identification (iTeam ID) on Revisit and WOM Intentions: A Moderated Mediation of Emotions and Flow

Yonghwan Chang, Daniel L. Wann, and Yuhei Inoue

examples include studies that show that fans with strong team ID experience greater emotional support from other fans, greater happiness in accordance with their team’s victories, and greater satisfaction with their life ( Inoue et al., 2017 ; Jang et al., 2017 ). The current understanding of team ID

Restricted access

Sport Participation and Subjective Well-Being: Instrumental Variable Results From German Survey Data

Jane E. Ruseski, Brad R. Humphreys, Kirstin Hallman, Pamela Wicker, and Christoph Breuer

Background:

A major policy goal of many ministries of sport and health is increased participation in sport to promote health. A growing literature is emerging about the benefits of sport participation on happiness. A challenge in establishing a link between sport participation and happiness is controlling for endogeneity of sport participation in the happiness equation.

Methods:

This study seeks to establish causal evidence of a relationship between sport participation and self reported happiness using instrumental variables (IV).

Results:

IV estimates based on data from a 2009 population survey living in Rheinberg, Germany indicate that individuals who participate in sport have higher life happiness. The results suggest a U-shaped relationship between age and self-reported happiness. Higher income is associated with greater self-reported happiness, males are less happy than females, and single individuals are less happy than nonsingles.

Conclusions:

Since the results are IV, this finding is interpreted as a causal relationship between sport participation and subjective well-being (SWB). This broader impact of sport participation on general happiness lends support to the policy priority of many governments to increase sport participation at all levels of the general population.

Restricted access

Habit, Health, and Happiness

James E. Maddux

The notion of habit figures prominently in theories of health-related behavior and in efforts to encourage people to develop consistency and regularity in the healthful behavior of daily life. The consensus definition of habit as automatic and mindless behavior, however, presents three logical and philosophical problems. First, this definition of habit is at odds with the way most of our theories of health behavior try to employ the notion. Second, the behaviors of concern to most health, exercise, and sport psychologists are not the kinds of behaviors to which this definition of habit applies easily, if at all. Third, the kind of mindless behavior suggested by this definition may be conducive to enhancing physical health and athletic performance, but it may be inconsistent with the essential elements of happiness or subjective well-being according to Eastern philosophies such as Taoism and Buddhism, and according to the growing research on the psychology of happiness.

Restricted access

The Role of Preperformance and In-Game Emotions in Cognitive Interference During Sport Performance: The Moderating Role of Self-Confidence and Reappraisal

Nicholas Stanger, Ryan Chettle, Jessica Whittle, and Jamie Poolton

-Jones ( 2010 ) posited that high-approach affective states (e.g., anger, excitement) result in attentional narrowing, whereas low-approach affective states (e.g., dejection or sadness, happiness) result in broadening of attentional focus. Specifically, positive high-approach affective states (e.g., excitement

Restricted access

Associations Between Physical Function and Subjective Well-Being in Older Adults From Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Results From the Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health (SAGE)

Theresa E. Gildner, J. Josh Snodgrass, Clare Evans, and Paul Kowal

included three commonly used measures of subjective well-being: (a) subjective QOL, (b) self-rated happiness, and (c) reported mood ( Diener et al., 2003 ). These generally relate to two important aspects of psychological well-being: evaluative well-being (or life satisfaction) and hedonic well