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Allison Ottenbacher, Mandi Yu, Richard P. Moser, Siobhan M. Phillips, Catherine Alfano, and Frank M. Perna

Background:

Evidence is building that strength training may reduce complications associated with cancer such as fatigue, muscle wasting, and lymphedema, particularly among breast and prostate cancer survivors. Population estimates are available for rates of aerobic physical activity; however, data on strength training in this population are limited. The objective of this study was to identify rates of meeting public health recommendations for strength training and aerobic activity among cancer survivors and individuals with no cancer history.

Methods:

Data from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS), Iteration 4 Cycle 1 and Cycle 2 were combined to conduct the analyses. Missing data were imputed, and weighted statistical analyses were conducted in SAS.

Results:

The proportion of individuals meeting both strength training and aerobic guidelines were low for both cancer survivors and those without a history of cancer. The odds of meeting strength training guidelines were significantly lower for women with a history of any cancer except breast, compared with women with no history of cancer (OR: 0.70, 95% CI: 0.51−0.96).

Conclusions:

More work needs to be done to understand why women with cancers other than breast, may be less inclined to engage in aerobic physical activity and strength training.

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Suyeong Bae, Monique R. Pappadis, Sanghun Nam, and Ickpyo Hong

history of depression and various covariates using propensity score matching methods. Methods Study Population We retrieved 7,992 individuals’ health information through the seventh 2018 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES VII-3), and among them, 1,653 were 65 years or older

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Malorie Polster, Erin E. Dooley, Kate Olscamp, Katrina L. Piercy, and April Oh

from the National Cancer Institute’s Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS), a nationally representative survey of noninstitutionalized US adults ages 18 years and older. Since 2003, HINTS has collected nationally representative data through multiple cross-sectional survey iterations and

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Laurie Stickler, Hayley Hall, and Barb Hoogenboom

dietitian, 41.67% answered yes, 20.00% said no, and 38.33% were unsure. Runners reported the frequency with which they consulted each of 11 potential sources of nutritional and health information (Table  1 ). Based on combined responses of occasionally and often , the surveyed runners most regularly

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Jeff Vallance, Susanne L. Lesniak, Lisa J. Belanger, and Kerry S. Courneya

Background:

We report the development and assessment of a physical activity (PA) guidebook called Step Up to the Challenge that is being used to support a PA behavior change intervention in a randomized trial examining PA and disease-free survival in colon cancer survivors.

Methods:

Content for the PA guidebook was constructed based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). Expert judges (N = 51) included oncologists, rehabilitation practitioners, colon cancer survivors, and TPB researchers. All expert judges completed the Maine Area Health Education Center checklist for evaluating written health information. A subset of TPB expert judges (n = 11) also assessed the degree of match between the guidebook content and TPB constructs.

Results:

Expert judges indicated that the PA guidebook achieved desirable attributes for organization, writing style, appearance, appeal, feasibility, and appropriateness. For the TPB assessment, all mean item-content relevance ratings indicated at least a “very good match” between the PA guidebook content and the TPB constructs.

Conclusions:

Our guidebook successfully targets the TPB constructs known to influence PA behavior change and contains suitable and appropriate written health information. This guidebook will be an integral component of the behavioral support program designed to determine the effects of PA on disease-free survival in colon cancer survivors.

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Catherine B. Chan and Catrine Tudor-Locke

Background:

We evaluated a pedometer-based community intervention under real-world conditions.

Methods:

Participants (n = 559) provided demographic and health information using surveys and steps/d at baseline and during the last week the participants were in the program. A 1-year follow-up was conducted, but in keeping with real-world conditions, no incentives were offered to participate.

Results:

Participants (89% female, age 48.1 [SD = 12] years) took 7864 (3114) steps/d at baseline. Postprogram voluntary response rates to mailed surveys were 41.3% at 12 weeks and 22.8% at 1 year. Program completers reported significantly higher steps/d at 12 weeks (~12,000 steps/d) and 1 year (~11,000 steps/d) compared with baseline.

Conclusions:

The improvement in steps/d in this real-world implementation was consistent with more controlled studies of pedometer-based interventions. Low response to voluntary follow-up is a study limitation but is expected of real-world evaluations.

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Tom Webb, Paul Gorczynski, Shakiba Oftadeh-Moghadam, and Laura Grubb

Research into the mental health of female sport match officials is scarce, despite verbal and physical abuse being commonplace. Twelve female match officials officiating male and female matches took part in semistructured interviews, investigating their experiences and understanding of their mental health. Deductive thematic analysis identified four overarching themes: male and female football environments; abuse, sexism, and homophobia in football; formal and informal support networks; and mental health knowledge and experience—accessing services. The results revealed toxic, abusive, male-dominated environments that included sexist and derogatory language, negatively affecting their mental health. The female match officials struggled to ascertain mechanisms for support and identified that the educational courses and local organizations did not provide mental health information or training, and match officials often experienced poor mental health during and after matches. Increased engagement with mental health literacy and policy change from governing bodies is required, given the unique challenges female match officials face.

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Kevin Patrick, Michael Pratt, and Robert E. Sallis

Background:

Healthcare professionals are influential sources of health information and guidance for people of all ages. However healthcare providers do not routinely address physical activity (PA). Engaging health professionals in a national plan for physical activity will depend upon whether proven strategies can be found to promote PA within clinical settings.

Methods:

The literature on promoting PA in healthcare settings was reviewed, as were recommendations from healthcare organizations and evidence-gathering entities about whether and how PA should be promoted in healthcare.

Key recommendations:

Evidence is mixed about whether interventions based in healthcare settings and offered by healthcare providers can improve PA behaviors in patients. Brief stand-alone counseling by physicians has not been shown to be efficacious, but office-based screening and advice to be active, followed by telephone or community support for PA has proven effective in creating lasting PA behavior improvement. Healthcare delivery models that optimize the organization of services across clinical and community resources may be very compatible with PA promotion in health care. Because of the importance of PA to health, healthcare providers are encouraged to consider adding PA as a vital sign for each medical visit for individuals aged 6 years and older.

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Rebekah Steele, W. Kerry Mummery, and Trudy Dwyer

Background:

A growing number of the population are using the Internet for health information, such as physical activity (PA). The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of delivery modes for a behavior change program targeting PA.

Methods:

A randomized trial was conducted with 192 subjects randomly allocated to either a face-to-face, Internet-mediated, or Internet-only arm of a 12-wk intervention. Subjects included inactive adults with Internet access. The primary outcome variable was self-reported PA, assessed at four time points.

Results:

The results showed no group × time interaction for PA F(6, 567) = 1.64, p > 0.05, and no main effect for group F(2, 189) = 1.58, p > 0.05. However, a main effect for time F(3, 567) = 75.7, p < 0.01 was observed for each group. All groups were statistically equivalent immediately post-intervention (p < 0.05), but not at the follow-up time points (p > 0.05). The Internet-mediated and Internet-only groups showed similar increases in PA to the face-to-face group immediately post-intervention.

Conclusions:

This study provides evidence in support of the Internet in the delivery of PA interventions and highlights avenues for future research.