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Associations Between Health-Enhancing Physical Activity and Country of Birth Among Women

Marita Södergren, Kristina Sundquist, Sven-Erik Johansson, Jan Sundquist, and Maria Hagströmer

Background:

The purpose of this study was to examine the association between total self-reported health-enhancing physical activity and country of birth among women living in Sweden.

Methods:

Women (age 18 to 65 years) born in Sweden, Finland, Chile, and Iraq were recruited for this cross-sectional study. Data were collected by means of a postal questionnaire including the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ-long version). Self-reported physical activity data were converted to MET-minutes per week and analyzed as continuous or categorical scores. A total of 2649 women were included in the analyses. The association between physical activity and country of birth was explored using ordinal logistic regression assuming proportional odds.

Results:

The total physical activity differed significantly between the countries of birth (P < .001). Women from Finland had significant higher odds and women from Iraq had significantly lower odds for reporting higher levels of physical activity, compared with Swedish-born women.

Conclusions:

The direction of the associations between self-reported total health-enhancing physical activity varied by country of birth, which underlines the need to examine physical activity in each minority group separately.

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Health Enhancing Physical Activity for Young People: Statement of the United Kingdom Expert Consensus Conference

Nick Cavill, Stuart Biddle, and James F. Sallis

An expert consensus development process was initiated to make public health recommendations regarding young people (5–18 years) and physical activity. Eight commissioned review papers were discussed at a meeting of over 50 academics and experts from a range of disciplines from the UK and overseas. Participants agreed on a consensus statement that summarized the research evidence and made two core recommendations. First, to optimize current and future health, all young people should participate in physical activity of at least moderate intensity for 1 hour per day. Young people who currently do little activity should participate in physical activity of at least moderate intensity for at least half an hour per day. The subsidiary recommendation is that, at least twice a week, some of these activities should help to enhance and maintain muscular strength and flexibility and bone health. A second aspect of the consensus process, which was based on extensive consultation, outlined the practical ways in which key organizations can work together to implement these recommendations. The resultant consensus statement provides a strong basis for the planning of future policies and programs to enhance young people’s participation in health-enhancing physical activity

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Health-Enhancing Physical Activity in Europe—Combined Aerobic Physical Activity and Muscle-Strengthening Exercise Guideline Adherence Among 280,605 Adults From 28 European Countries

Jason A. Bennie and Glen H. Wiesner

Physical Activity Guideline b and APR d for Meeting the Guidelines for the Total Sample and by Sociodemographic/Lifestyle Characteristics and by Country Met the health-enhancing physical activity guideline b (aerobic PA ≥ 150 min/wk and MSE ≥ 2 sessions/wk) n % a (95% CI) APR c,d (95% CI) Total sample

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The School and Promotion of Children’s Health-Enhancing Physical Activity: Perspectives from the United Kingdom

Kenneth R. Fox, Ashley Cooper, and Jim McKenna

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Colombian Children With Overweight and Obesity Need Additional Motivational Support at School to Perform Health-Enhancing Physical Activity

Patricia Olaya-Contreras, Myriam Bastidas, and Daniel Arvidsson

Aims:

The aim of this study is to investigate associations of screen-time and physical activity (PA) with self-efficacy for PA, intrinsic motivation to PA and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in Colombian schoolchildren from socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods, and to compare these variables among children with normal-weight (NW), overweight (OW) and obesity (OB).

Methods:

In 678 schoolchildren (age 10–14 years) screen-time (TV, video games, computer) and number of days being physically active ≥ 60 minutes were self-reported. Multi-item scales were used to assess self-efficacy to PA and intrinsic motivation to PA. The KIDSCREEN-27 was used to assess HRQoL.

Results:

Screen-time was associated with HRQoL in the school/learning environment dimension. Number of days being physically active was associated with self-efficacy for PA, intrinsic motivation for PA and with HRQoL concerning physical well-being, autonomy/parent relation and social support/peers. Group differences were found for days being physically active (OW = 2.8 and OB = 2.7 vs. NW = 3.3) but not for screen-time (NW = 5.0, OW = 4.7 and OB = 5.7 hrs·d-1). OW and OB scored lower on intrinsic motivation to PA than NW (OW = 19.2 and OB = 17.9 versus NW = 20.1). All 3 groups differed in physical well-being scores (NW = 50.3, OW = 48.1, OB = 40.6, P < .001).

Conclusions:

Schoolchildren with overweight and obesity from socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods need additional motivational support to perform health-enhancing PA to experience higher physical well-being.

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Associations of Physical Activity Policies With Sports Participation in EU Countries: Higher Overall Levels, Smaller Social Inequalities, and More Positive Trends Since 2009

Michael Mutz and Marlena van Munster

and active lifestyles, many European governments as well as EU institutions have agreed on health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA) policies. Precisely, EU member states agreed upon 23 single HEPA policy measures in 2013, fully explained by Breda et al. 18 In short, these measures refer to policy

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A Critique of National Physical Activity Policy in Oman Using 3 Established Policy Frameworks

Huda Al Siyabi, Ruth M. Mabry, Amal Al Siyabi, and Karen Milton

, target groups, goals and targets, time frame, budget, and evaluation and surveillance. 13 This grid emphasizes intersectoral engagement in terms of policy development and implementation. The health-enhancing physical activity policy audit tool identifies 17 criteria for a successful policy approach

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Physical Inactivity in Nigerian Young Adults: Prevalence and Socio-Demographic Correlates

Babatunde O.A. Adegoke and Adewale L. Oyeyemi

Background:

This study assessed the prevalence of physical inactivity and the influence of sociodemographic variables on physical activity categories, highlighting the correlates of physical inactivity in Nigerian young adults.

Methods:

A representative sample of young adults age 16 to 39 years (n = 1006) from a Nigerian University were categorized using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire as physically inactive, moderately active, and highly active. Prevalence rates were computed for the activity categories and the independent associations of sociodemographic correlates on each category were determined using the multinomial logistic regression.

Results:

Physical inactivity prevalence was 41%. More likely to be inactive were females (OR = 1.93; CI: 1.49−2.49), those of Hausa ethnicity (OR = 2.29; CI: 1.08−5.84), having BMI > 30 kg/m2 (OR = 2.88; CI: 1.16−7.17), and those whose parents’ annual income was < 180,000 NAIRA (OR = 1.69; CI: 1.04−2.95). Less likely to be moderately active were females (OR = 0.71; CI: 0.61−0.95), those with BMI between 25.0 to 29.9 kg/m2 (OR = 0.46; CI: 0.23−0.92), and those of Hausa ethnicity (OR = 0.17; CI: 0.04−0.74).

Conclusion:

Important sociodemographic variables that can contribute to the preliminary analysis of correlates of physical inactivity among Nigerian young adults were identified.

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Potential of a Sports Club–Based Exercise Program for Improving Physical Activity in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Christian Lackinger, Sandra Haider, Lana Kosi, Juergen Harreiter, Yvonne Winhofer, and Alexandra Kautzky-Willer

Background:

Although the infrastructure of Austrians’ sports clubs is well developed, exercise classes for people suffering from type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) do not exist. This feasibility study evaluates factors for participating in target group specific exercise courses (TGSEC) and changes in physical activity.

Methods:

This intervention study was performed in 22 communities of Austria. Initial TGSEC were offered to T2DM patients over 2 months. Participants were surveyed at 4 time points with a questionnaire: before the program, 2, 6 and 12 months after the initial questionnaire.

Results:

881 patients aged 59.0 (SD: 9.6) years took part in TGSEC. At baseline a lack of suitable exercise groups prevented 51% from being active. 58% were encouraged by the medical sector. After 12 months the weekly time spent on exercise training was increased from 1.40 (SD: 2.55) hours to 2.15 (SD: 3.00) hours (P < .001). The dropout rate during the first 2 months was 12.9%. The rate of return for the 12 months questionnaire was 42%.

Conclusion:

TGSEC provided by sports clubs attract people suffering from T2DM and effectively enhance physical activity.

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Students’ Knowledge and Behaviors for Active Living: A Cross-Sectional Survey Study

Yang Liu and Senlin Chen

responses to physical activity. Demonstrates use of self-management skills related to maintaining a physically active lifestyle. Employs self-management skills to maintain a physically active lifestyle. PD#3 Describes characteristics of health-enhancing physical activity. Participates in a variety of health