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Holly F. Serrao, Matthew P. Martens, Jessica L. Martin and Tracey L. Rocha

Large-scale, national research studies have consistently indicated that college students participating in athletics consume more alcohol than nonathletes. Theorists have speculated that a number of risk factors could be associated with heavy drinking among this group, although research in the area has been sparse. The purpose of the current study was to assess the relationship between one possible risk factor, competitiveness, in a sample of recreational and elite college athletes to determine whether competitiveness was related to alcohol use among these athletes. Data were collected from a sample of 298 undergraduates from a large university in the northeastern United States. Results showed that competitiveness was associated with higher amounts of alcohol consumption. Clinical implications and future research directions are discussed.

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Jeremy J. Noble, Michael B. Madson, Richard S. Mohn and Jon T. Mandracchia

Heavy episodic drinking (HED) is related to an increase in negative consequences (Wechsler, Lee, Kuo, & Lee, 2000) including approximately 599,000 unintentional injuries and 1,825 deaths annually among college students (Hingson, Edwards, Heeren, & Rosenbloom, 2009). College athletes participate in greater alcohol consumption and experience more negative consequences than their nonathlete peers (Hildebrand, Johnson, & Bogle, 2001). Protective behavioral strategies (PBS) have played a significant role in reducing alcohol-related negative consequences within the college population (Martens et al., 2004). However, little is known about PBS use within specific at-risk populations such as athletes. This study aimed to identify the relationship between alcohol consumption, the use of protective behavioral strategies, and negative consequences among intercollegiate athletes. Results indicated that PBS partially mediated the relationship between alcohol consumption and negative consequences. Implications for intercollegiate athlete intervention and prevention programs are discussed as well as limitations of the study and directions for future research.

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Kingsley K. Akinroye and Ade F. Adeniyi

lifestyle among children and youth. According to the World Health Organisation, 2 two-thirds of premature deaths in adults are associated with childhood conditions and behaviours. Such common behaviours including smoking, heavy episodic drinking and physical inactivity are associated with NCD risks, with

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Kim Gammage, Rachel Arnold, Nicole Bolter, Lori Dithurbide, Karl Erickson, Blair Evans, Larkin Lamarche, Sean Locke, Eric Martin and Kathleen Wilson

and heavy episodic drinking), and questions on the athletes’ perceptions of their head coaches’ attitudes and behaviors toward athlete alcohol use. Results indicated that few athletes perceived their head coach to be conditionally lenient about alcohol consumption, and the more they perceived coaches

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Graig M. Chow, Matthew D. Bird, Stinne Soendergaard and Yanyun Yang

athlete alcohol use and heavy episodic drinking, whereas enforcement had no effect. It is important to note that the measure created by Pitts et al. ( 2018 ) assessed athletes’ evaluations of their head coach’s attitudes and behaviors regarding athlete alcohol use rather than head coaches’ self