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Colin D. McLaren and Kevin S. Spink

 = .01) but had less unique predictive utility. A full summary of the results of the hierarchical-regression analysis can be found in Table  2 . Table 2 Member Communication Predicting Task Cohesion While Controlling for Team Performance Variable R adjusted 2 F (degrees of freedom) β sr t Step 1: .09 17

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Iréné Lopez-Fontana, Carole Castanier, Christine Le Scanff and Alexandra Perrot

, Pearson correlations and t -tests were used in order to determine sample characteristics and compare sociodemographic characteristics, physical activity (recent and past long-term), and cognitive scores of women and men. After preliminary analysis, moderated hierarchical regression analyses, following

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Ibrahim M. Altubasi

created for all functional performance tests to identify the individual contribution of each independent variable in the prediction of the functional performance tests. The independent variables were entered into the hierarchical regression models successively in the following order: age, then average NSA

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Steven Love, Lee Kannis-Dymand and Geoff P. Lovell

mindfulness facets, one hierarchical regression was performed with metacognitions in stage 1, the mindfulness facets in stage 2, and total flow state as the dependant variable (Table  3 ). Multicollinearity was deemed acceptable as Durbin-Watson, VIF, tolerance and correlations were in appropriate ranges

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Stephen Samendinger, Christopher R. Hill, Teri J. Hepler and Deborah L. Feltz

controlled in the model. This analysis excludes day 1, when the participants cycled alone and utilized day 2-to-day 12 sequential data for persistence and pre-exercise self-efficacy hierarchical regression models. The analysis proceeded as follows: step A residualized day 2 persistence was first generated by

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Grace Yan, Dustin Steller, Nicholas M. Watanabe and Nels Popp

Bowl Subdivision (FBS) teams over the 2014–15 season was analyzed using hierarchical regression analysis. Specifically, we developed the following research questions: RQ1 : What macrolevel factors had a significant relationship with the volume of microblog content created discussing FBS college

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Lisa E. Bolger, Linda A. Bolger, Cian O’Neill, Edward Coughlan, Wesley O’Brien, Seán Lacey and Con Burns

.1, medium = 0.3, and large = 0.5). 45 Figure 1 —Perceived and actual locomotor competence. Figure 2 —Perceived and actual object-control competence. Figure 3 —Perceived and actual total FMS competence. FMS indicates fundamental movement skills. Hierarchical regression analysis was conducted, adjusting for

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M. Renée Umstattd, Stephanie L. Baller, Gina H. Blunt and Michelle L. Darst

Background:

The objective of this pilot study was to examine demographic, health, behavioral, and social cognitive correlates of perceived worksite environmental support for physical activity (PA) in middle-age adults.

Methods:

A convenience sample (N = 173) of University employees in the Southeastern U.S. (mean age = 45) was surveyed using an internet-based questionnaire. Measures included perceived worksite environmental support for PA, self-reported minutes of moderate-to-vigorous PA, self-regulation, self-efficacy for walking transportation, PA social support, health status, and sociodemographic items. Bivariate and hierarchical regression analyses were computed to examine correlates of perceived worksite environmental support for PA.

Results:

Bivariate analyses revealed male gender, self-reported moderate-to-vigorous PA, self-regulation use, self-efficacy for walking transportation, and PA social support from friends and family as independent, positive correlates of perceived worksite environmental support for PA (P ≤ .05). Hierarchical regression analyses revealed self-regulation use and PA social support from friends as independent, positive correlates of perceived worksite environmental support for PA (final model R2 = 20.30%, P ≤ .0001).

Conclusions:

Although causality cannot be determined, these pilot findings support a social cognitive approach. Further exploration of these relationships is warranted and health educators should consider perceptions of physical and social environments in planning future worksite PA promotion programs.

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Constantinos A. Loucaides and Russell Jago

Background:

The purpose of this study was to examine the association between pedometer-assessed physical activity and a number of individual, social, and environmental correlates among Cypriot elementary school children.

Methods:

School children in grades 5 and 6 (N = 104) and their parents (N = 70) wore pedometers for five consecutive weekdays and completed questionnaires assessing potential correlates of steps/d.

Results:

A hierarchical regression analysis indicated that gender, weekly frequency of sports club attendance, and hours playing outside accounted for 32% of the variance in steps/d. In addition, children with a body-mass index (BMI) above the 85th percentile (based on age and gender) scored significantly lower steps/d than children with a BMI below the 85th percentile.

Conclusions:

This study suggested that correlates of steps/d in children are similar to the findings of other studies using different measures of physical activity behavior.

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Jan Boehmer and Edson C. Tandoc Jr.

The current study explored factors influencing content sharing on Twitter in the context of sport news. It employed a 2-step text-based analysis combining qualitative and quantitative approaches and found that 3 main categories of factors are influencing retweeting decisions: characteristics of the source, characteristics of the message, and characteristics of the user. A subsequent hierarchical-regression analysis revealed that factors related to a user’s encounter of a Tweet are the best predictor of retweeting intentions. More specifically, interest in the exact topic of the tweet, the perceived relevance that the tweet might have for the user’s own followers, and similarity in opinion play important roles. Implications for communication practitioners, as well as research investigating human behavior on social media, are discussed.