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Stéphanie Turgeon, Kelsey Kendellen, Sara Kramers, Scott Rathwell and Martin Camiré

Sport is one of the most popular extracurricular activities for high school students in Canada and the United States. In Canada, high school sports are practiced by over 750,000 student-athletes throughout the country ( School Sport Canada, 2018 ). In the United States, high school sport

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Paul M. Wright and Suzanne Burton

Underserved youth are at risk for numerous threats to their physical and psychological well-being. To navigate the challenges they face, they need a variety of positive life skills. This study systematically explored the implementation and short-term outcomes of a responsibility-based physical activity program that was integrated into an intact high school physical education class. Qualitative methods, drawing on multiple data sources, were used to evaluate a 20-lesson teaching personal and social responsibility (TPSR) program. Participants were 23 African American students in an urban high school. Five themes characterized the program: (a) establishing a relevant curriculum, (b) navigating barriers, (c) practicing life skills, (d) seeing the potential for transfer, and (e) creating a valued program. Findings extend the empirical literature related to TPSR and, more generally, physical activity programs designed to promote life skills. Implications for practitioners are discussed.

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Mauro Virgílio Gomes de Barros, Markus Vinicius Nahas, Pedro Curi Hallal, José Cazuza de Farias Júnior, Alex Antônio Florindo and Simone Storino Honda de Barros

Background:

We evaluated the effectiveness of a school-based intervention on the promotion of physical activity among high school students in Brazil: the Saude na Boa project.

Methods:

A school-based, randomized trial was carried out in 2 Brazilian cities: Recife (northeast) and Florianopolis (south). Ten schools in each city were matched by size and location, and randomized into intervention or control groups. The intervention included environmental/organizational changes, physical activity education, and personnel training and engagement. Students age 15 to 24 years were evaluated at baseline and 9 months later (end of school year).

Results:

Although similar at baseline, after the intervention, the control group reported significantly fewer d/wk accumulating 60 minutes+ moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in comparison with the intervention group (2.6 versus 3.3, P < .001). The prevalence of inactivity (0 days per week) rose in the control and decreased in the intervention group. The odds ratio for engaging at least once per week in physical activity associated with the intervention was 1.83 (95% CI = 1.24–2.71) in the unadjusted analysis and 1.88 (95% CI = 1.27–2.79) after controlling for gender.

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Markus V. Nahas, Mauro V. G. de Barros, Maria Alice A. de Assis, Pedro C. Hallal, Alex A. Florindo and Lisandra Konrad

Background:

A cross-cultural, randomized study was proposed to observe the effects of a school-based intervention designed to promote physical activity and healthy eating among high school students in 2 cities from different regions in Brazil: Recife and Florianopolis. The objective of this article is to describe the methodology and subjects enrolled in the project.

Methods:

Ten schools from each region were matched and randomized into intervention and control conditions. A questionnaire and anthropometry were used to collect data in the first and last month of the 2006 school year. The sample (n = 2155 at baseline; 55.7% females; 49.1% in the experimental group) included students 15 to 24 years, attending nighttime classes. The intervention focused on simple environmental/organizational changes, diet and physical activity education, and personnel training.

Results:

The central aspects of the intervention have been implemented in all 10 intervention schools. Problems during the intervention included teachers’ strikes in both sites and lack of involvement of the canteen owners in schools.

Conclusions:

The Saude na Boa study provides evidence that public high schools in Brazil represent an important environment for health promotion. Its design and simple measurements increase the chances of it being sustained and disseminated to similar schools in Brazil.

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Riana R. Pryor, Douglas J. Casa, Susan W. Yeargin and Zachary Y. Kerr

school football athletes are treated for exertional heat illness (EHI) on the athletic field and in emergency rooms each year. 1 Football athletes develop EHI at a rate 4–11 times higher than other high school sports, with 14.7 EHI per 100,000 athlete exposures during preseason practices. 2 – 4 Due to

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Brock McMullen, Hester L. Henderson, Donna Harp Ziegenfuss and Maria Newton

school athletics, for example, may be more focused on refining specialized sport skills and perfecting strategies and tactics. Currently, in the United States, there are approximately 4.5 million high school male athletes contributing to a total of more than 7.9 million high school sport participants

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Scott Pierce, Jedediah Blanton and Daniel Gould

into how to connect and engage with multiple stakeholders in the sporting community. One community where SPPs can maximize their impact is in high school sports. Catering to approximately 7.8 million student-athletes each year in the United States ( NFHS, 2017a ), high school sports are considered a

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Christine C. Center, Samuel J. Wilkins, Ross Mathiasen and Adam B. Rosen

Key Points ▸ This case highlights a senior high school football player diagnosed with an acute subdural hematoma (SDH). ▸ On-field assessment of SDH likely reduced the potential of mortality. ▸ This case illustrates the importance of quick activation of emergency medical services for a positive

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Summer Davis, Xihe Zhu and Justin Haegele

shows that as students move to a higher grade, they are less likely to meet the criteria to be in the healthy fitness zone (HFZ; Zhu, Haegele, Shao, & Davis, 2019 ), and some high school students view fitness testing as a negative factor in deciding whether to enroll in elective physical education

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David Eitle, Steven Swinford and Abagail Klonsinski

examined. There are few studies that explore whether male sport participation, especially organized sport participation in high school, has long-term behavioral consequences, including a heightened risk of violence perpetration. However, there do exist compelling reasons to explore whether such sport