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Elissa Burton, Gill Lewin and Duncan Boldy

The proportion of older people living in our communities is rising and, to live independently, some require assistance from home care services. Physical activity can improve and maintain function, strength, and balance, which are important for those receiving home care. This study reviewed the evidence on physical activity/exercise interventions trialed with older people receiving a home care service. A systematic review of studies published from January 1982 to September 2012, from five databases, was undertaken. Inclusion criteria were: aged 65+ years; community dwelling; no dementia diagnosis; receiving home care services; and a physical activity/exercise program. Eight articles were included and results show there were few consistencies between intervention types, groups, outcome measures, and follow-up. Study quality was mixed. Future studies should include pragmatic randomized controlled trials involving home care practitioners and their clients to gain “real-world” knowledge of what interventions are effective and can be delivered within this setting.

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Sharon Hetherington, Paul Swinton, Tim Henwood, Justin Keogh, Paul Gardiner, Anthony Tuckett, Kevin Rouse and Tracy Comans

intention of this service is to facilitate continued independence, in practice, little exercise therapy is provided in this program to promote the rehabilitation of physical function ( Commonwealth of Australia, 2017 ). For adults receiving in-home care services through the CHSP, progressive resistance plus

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Elissa Burton, Gill Lewin and Duncan Boldy

The 3 study objectives were to compare the activity levels of older people who had received a restorative home care service with those of people who had received “usual” home care, explore the predictors of physical activity in these 2 groups, and determine whether either group met the minimum recommended activity levels for their age group. A questionnaire was posted to 1,490 clients who had been referred for a home care service between 2006 and 2009. Older people who had received a restorative care service were more active than those who had received usual care (p = .049), but service group did not predict activity levels when other variables were adjusted for in a multiple regression. Younger individuals who were in better physical condition, with good mobility and no diagnosis of depression, were more likely to be active. Investigation of alternatives to the current exercise component of the restorative program is needed.

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Tim Henwood, Sharon Hetherington, Madeleine Purss, Kevin Rouse, Julie Morrow and Michele Smith

expenditure will increase by 2050 and the demand for home assistance and residential aged care placement will more than triple ( Goss, 2008 ; Productivity Commission, 2012 ). At present, more than one million older Australians receive home care services each year ( Productivity Commission, 2012 ). Increasing

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Koren L. Fisher, Elizabeth L. Harrison, Brenda G. Bruner, Joshua A. Lawson, Bruce A. Reeder, Nigel L. Ashworth, M. Suzanne Sheppard and Karen E. Chad

PASE (Table  2 ). Age, living in seniors’ housing, use of nursing services, use of home care services, and receiving encouragement all showed significant negative associations with PASE score. Significant positive associations were seen for self-efficacy score, PCS-12, MCS-12, the presence of walking

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Pablo Antonio Valdés-Badilla, Carlos Gutiérrez-García, Mikel Pérez-Gutiérrez, Rodrigo Vargas-Vitoria and Antonio López-Fuenzalida

people receiving a restorative home care service: A pragmatic randomized controlled trial . Clinical Interventions in Aging, 8 , 1591 – 1601 . PubMed ID: 24324331 doi:10.2147/CIA.S44614 10.2147/CIA.S44614 Cameron , M. , Chahine , N. , Selig , S. , & Newton , P. ( 2008 ). A pilot program of