Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 67 items for :

  • "horizontal jump" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Raúl Reina, Aitor Iturricastillo, Rafael Sabido, Maria Campayo-Piernas and Javier Yanci

degree of horizontal strength, 3 , 5 recent research has also focused interest on studying horizontal jump (HJ) capacity in football players. 3 , 5 , 6 Cerebral palsy (CP) is a nonprogressive upper motor neuron disorder caused by lesions in the motor cortex, cerebellum, and basal ganglia before, during

Restricted access

Alasdair Strokosch, Loic Louit, Laurent Seitz, Richard Clarke and Jonathan D. Hughes

performance of a heavy resistance potentiating stimulus before a PAP effect can be seen in horizontal jump exercise. 5 , 6 In an applied setting, such as professional team sports, contrast protocols of alternating heavy and light sets, or a heavy exercise paired with an explosive or ballistic exercise are

Restricted access

Oliver Gonzalo-Skok, Julio Tous-Fajardo, José Luis Arjol-Serrano, Luis Suarez-Arrones, José Antonio Casajús and Alberto Mendez-Villanueva

Purpose:

To examine the effects of a low-volume repeated-power-ability (RPA) training program on repeated-sprint and changeof-direction (COD) ability and functional jumping performance.

Methods:

Twenty-two male elite young basketball players (age 16.2 ± 1.2 y, height 190.0 ± 10.0 cm, body mass 82.9 ± 10.1 kg) were randomly assigned either to an RPA-training group (n = 11) or a control group (n = 11). RPA training consisted of leg-press exercise, twice a week for 6 wk, of 1 or 2 blocks of 5 sets × 5 repetitions with 20 s of passive recovery between sets and 3 min between blocks with the load that maximized power output. Before and after training, performance was assessed by a repeated-sprint-ability (RSA) test, a repeated-COD-ability test, a hop for distance, and a drop jump followed by tests of a double unilateral hop with the right and left legs.

Results:

Within-group and between-groups differences showed substantial improvements in slowest (RSAs) and mean time (RSAm) on RSA; best, slowest and mean time on repeated-COD ability; and unilateral right and left hop in the RPA group in comparison with control. While best time on RSA showed no improvement in any group, there was a large relationship (r = .68, 90% CI .43;.84) between the relative decrement in RSAm and RSAs, suggesting better sprint maintenance with RPA training. The relative improvements in best and mean repeated-COD ability were very largely correlated (r = .89, 90% CI .77;.94).

Conclusions:

Six weeks of low-volume (4–14 min/wk) RPA training improved several physical-fitness tests in basketball players.

Restricted access

Bing Yu and James G. Andrews

The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between free limb motions and triple jump performance. The subjects were 13 elite male triple jumpers. Three-dimensional videographic data were collected using a direct linear transformation technique with panning cameras. Changes in the velocity of the whole body center of gravity (G), changes in the whole body angular momentum about G, changes in the velocity of G due to free limb motions, and changes in the whole body angular momentum about G due to free limb motions were determined for each of the three support phases. Free limb motions were associated with decreases in the forward horizontal velocity of G and increases in the vertical velocity of G and significantly influenced changes of the corresponding velocity components of G when the changes were large. The free limb motions also created some angular momentum components about G during each support phase but did not significantly influence the changes of the corresponding angular momentum components of the whole body. Neither the changes in the three velocity components of G nor the changes in the three angular momentum components of the whole body about G due to free limb motions were significantly related to the actual distance of the triple jump.

Restricted access

Brian T. McCormick, James C. Hannon, Maria Newton, Barry Shultz, Nicole Detling and Warren B. Young

Plyometrics is a popular training modality for basketball players to improve power and change-of-direction speed. Most plyometric training has used sagittal-plane exercises, but improvements in change-of-direction speed have been greater in multidirection programs.

Purpose:

To determine the benefits of a 6-wk frontal-plane plyometric (FPP) training program compared with a 6-wk sagittal-plane plyometric (SPP) training program with regard to power and change-of-direction speed.

Methods:

Fourteen female varsity high school basketball players participated in the study. Multiple 2 × 2 repeated-measures ANOVAs were used to determine differences for the FPP and SPP groups from preintervention to postintervention on 4 tests of power and 2 tests of change-of-direction speed.

Results:

There was a group main effect for time in all 6 tests. There was a significant group × time interaction effect in 3 of the 6 tests. The SPP improved performance of the countermovement vertical jump more than the FPP, whereas the FPP improved performance of the lateral hop (left) and lateral-shuffle test (left) more than the SPP. The standing long jump, lateral hop (right), and lateral-shuffle test (right) did not show a significant interaction effect.

Conclusions:

These results suggest that basketball players should incorporate plyometric training in all planes to improve power and change-of-direction speed.

Full access

Berkiye Kirmizigil, Jeffry Roy Chauchat, Omer Yalciner, Gozde Iyigun, Ender Angin and Gul Baltaci

time was retained for the analyses. Horizontal Jump Performance The horizontal jump performance was assessed by using the double-leg hop test. The participants started in a standing position with their toes just behind the starting line. They began the jumping movement by swinging their arms and

Restricted access

Olaf Prieske, Helmi Chaabene, Christian Puta, David G. Behm, Dirk Büsch and Urs Granacher

has previously been postulated that reactive strength training, in general, and DJ exercises, in particular, could be introduced during adolescence. 12 Furthermore, significant medium- to large-sized correlations were found between vertical jump (eg, countermovement jump height) and horizontal jump

Restricted access

Oliver Gonzalo-Skok, Alejandro Moreno-Azze, José Luis Arjol-Serrano, Julio Tous-Fajardo and Chris Bishop

, such leg was defined as the weaker leg). Tests were performed 2 weeks and 1 week (reliability analysis) before training and 1 week after the training period. Tests included a single-leg horizontal jump test, a triple single-leg horizontal jump test, and unilateral and bilateral CMJ tests. Furthermore

Restricted access

Christopher D. Ramos, Melvin Ramey, Rand R. Wilcox and Jill L. McNitt-Gray

Maximizing horizontal distance traveled during a horizontal jump requires effective regulation of total body momentum prior to departure from the ground. When initiating a horizontal jump with initial horizontal velocity, jumpers convert some of their horizontal momentum at contact to vertical

Restricted access

Mehrez Hammami, Rodrigo Ramirez-Campillo, Nawel Gaamouri, Gaith Aloui, Roy J. Shephard and Mohamed Souhaiel Chelly

25.7 (1.5) 32.1 (1.5) 25.0 (1.4) <.001 4.39 25.5 (1.5) 25.2 a 27.9 (1.5) 9.4 (0.5) <.001 1.66 .918 <.001 1.39 Horizontal jump, cm  5JT 7.44 (0.75) 8.64 (0.5) 16.3 (1.7) <.001 1.68 7.58 (0.68) 7.4 a 7.98 (0.68) 7.8 a 5.3 (0.5) .001 0.61 .937 .01 0.573 Y balance test  Right support leg, cm   RL/R 63