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Astin D. Steward and George B. Cunningham

Across two experimental studies, the purpose of this research project was to examine how Whites evaluate African Americans with a strong racial identity. In Study 1, participants evaluated applicants for an athletic director position. Relative to their weakly identified counterparts, applicants believed to possess a strong racial identity were rated as a poorer fit for the job. Results from Study 2, which was also set within the context of hiring an athletic director, show that participant social dominance orientation moderates the relationship between racial identity and subsequent evaluations. The authors discuss theoretical and practical implications, limitations, and future directions.

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Ben A. Larkin and Janet S. Fink

Fantasy sport has become a prominent topic of study for sport management scholars over the last decade, and along with the rise of this research have come questions regarding how fantasy sport involvement impacts fans’ loyalty to their favorite team(s). Although this question has been posed several times, results have been mixed. We posit that this is largely attributable to the fact that to this point researchers have not considered the situational environment under which fantasy sport has proliferated or the psychological processes of consumers facing multiple consumption options. Therefore, we examined a model featuring fear of missing out as an antecedent to fantasy sport involvement, social media involvement, and team identity salience during games. Furthermore, we examine the role social media involvement plays in allowing fans to accommodate both their fantasy sport and team identities during games. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

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Fleur E.C.A. van Rens and Edson Filho

specialization sports such as gymnastics, former athletes particularly struggle with athletic retirement due to the loss of their athletic self-identity ( Gagné, Ryan, & Bargmann, 2003 ; Warriner & Lavallee, 2008 ). Similar to career transitions within sport, coping skills and personal resources are critical in

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Matthew Katz, Thomas A. Baker III and Hui Du

connectedness through a shared social identity ( Wann, Waddill, Polk, & Weaver, 2011 ), and an increased team affiliation may contribute to maintaining and facilitating interpersonal relationships ( Doyle, Filo, Lock, Funk, & McDonald, 2016 ). To facilitate further interpersonal relationships, remote fans have

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Fleur E.C.A. van Rens, Rebecca A. Ashley and Andrea R. Steele

domains, as well as indicators of well-being, should be considered when investigating student-athletes’ dual careers ( Ivarsson et al., 2015 ; Stambulova et al., 2015 ). Erikson ( 1968 ) proposed that an individual’s identity is multidimensional, meaning that is consists of a series of domain

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Elizabeth B. Delia

For many sport fans, identifying with a team presents the psychological benefit of a sense of belongingness and, thus, an enhanced sense of self ( Heere & James, 2007 ; Lock & Heere, 2017 ). Rooted in social identity theory ( Tajfel & Turner, 1979 ), the psychological benefits of team

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Bob Heere, Jeffrey James, Masayuki Yoshida and Glaucio Scremin

The primary purpose of this study was to assess the proposition that identification with a university, city and/ or state could affect an individual’s identification process with a sport team (Heere & James, 2007a). The team identity scale was modified and used to measure multiple group identities. A secondary purpose was to provide further evidence of the reliability and validity of the multidimensional group identity instrument. The results provide some evidence that the group identity instrument is reliable and valid in four settings: team, university, city, and state. For this particular sample, team identity was positively influenced by the associated group identities. The findings support the use of a group identity scale to test different group identities and support the proposition that identification with a focal group such as a sport team does not exist in a vacuum and may be influenced by an individual’s relationship with other groups.

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Kun Liang

Age identity is a significant part of self-perceptions of aging, or “individuals’ view of themselves becoming older” ( Levy, 2003 , p. 207). In extant literature, youthful age identities often refer to feeling younger than one’s chronological age ( Westerhof & Barrett, 2005 ) or perceiving oneself

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Geraldine M. Murphy, Albert J. Petitpas and Britton W. Brewer

A study was conducted with 124 intercollegiate student-athletes at an NCAA Division I institution to examine the relationship between self-identity variables (i.e., identity foreclosure and athletic identity) and career maturity. Results indicated that both identity foreclosure and athletic identity were inversely related to career maturity. Significant effects of gender, playing status (varsity vs. nonvarsity), and sport (revenue producing vs. nonrevenue producing) on career maturity were observed. The findings suggest that failure to explore alternative roles and identifying strongly and exclusively with the athlete role are associated with delayed career development in intercollegiate student athletes, and that male varsity student-athletes in revenue-producing sports may be especially at risk for impaired acquisition of career decision-making skills. The results underscore the importance of understanding athletic identity issues and exercising caution in challenging sport-related occupational aspirations in presenting career development interventions to student-athletes.

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Mara Simon and Laura Azzarito

Ethnic minority female physical education (PE) teachers who work in predominantly White schools may face multiple, intersecting forms of oppression due to inherent underlying notions of whiteness, which position the embodiment of a racialized identity as “other” ( Burden, Harrison, & Hodge, 2005