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Timothy A. Burkhart and David M. Andrews

The effectiveness of wrist guards and modifying elbow posture for reducing impact-induced accelerations at the wrist and elbow, for the purpose of decreasing upper extremity injury risk during forward fall arrest, has not yet been documented in living people. A seated human pendulum was used to simulate the impact conditions consistent with landing on outstretched arms during a forward fall. Accelerometers measured the wrist and elbow response characteristics of 28 subjects following impacts with and without a wrist guard, and with elbows straight or slightly bent. Overall, the wrist guard was very effective, with significant reductions in peak accelerations at the elbow in the axial and off-axis directions, and in the off-axis direction at the wrist by almost 50%. The effect of elbow posture as an intervention strategy was mixed; a change in magnitude and direction of the acceleration response was documented at the elbow, while there was little effect at the wrist. Unique evidence was presented in support of wrist guard use in activities like in-line skating where impacts to the hands are common. The elbow response clearly shows that more proximal anatomical structures also need to be monitored when assessing the effectiveness of injury prevention strategies.

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Pairoj Saonuam, Niramon Rasri, Kornkanok Pongpradit, Dyah Anantalia Widyastari and Piyawat Katewongsa

youth used active transportation (walking, cycling, using a wheelchair, in-line skating or skateboarding) to get to and from places Sedentary Behaviors D- 25.6% of children and youth met the Canadian Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines (5- to 17-year-olds: no more than two hours of recreational screen time

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Tatiane Piucco, Rogério Soares, Fernando Diefenthaeler, Guillaume Y. Millet and Juan M. Murias

– 1440 . PubMed ID: 10527316 doi:10.1097/00005768-199910000-00012 10.1097/00005768-199910000-00012 10527316 6. Rundell KW . Compromised oxygen uptake in speed skaters during treadmill in-line skating . Med Sci Sports Exerc . 1996 ; 28 ( 1 ): 120 – 127 . PubMed ID: 8775364 doi:10

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Tatiane Piucco, Fernando Diefenthaeler, Rogério Soares, Juan M. Murias and Guillaume Y. Millet

uptake in speed skaters during treadmill in-line skating . Med Sci Sports Exerc . 1996 ; 28 : 120 – 127 . PubMed doi:10.1097/00005768-199601000-00023 8775364 10.1097/00005768-199601000-00023 4. Snyder AC , O’Hagan KP , Clifford PS , Hoffman MD , Foster C . Exercise responses to in-line

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Philippe Richard, Lymperis P. Koziris, Mathieu Charbonneau, Catherine Naulleau, Jonathan Tremblay and François Billaut

– 1440 . PubMed ID: 10527316 doi:10.1097/00005768-199910000-00012 10.1097/00005768-199910000-00012 10527316 2. Rundell KW . Compromised oxygen uptake in speed skaters during treadmill in-line skating . Med Sci Sports Exerc . 1996 ; 28 ( 1 ): 120 – 127 . PubMed ID: 8775364 doi:10

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Aysha M. Thomas, Kayleigh M. Beaudry, Kimbereley L. Gammage, Panagiota Klentrou and Andrea R. Josse

from before entering university (ie, their time in their final grade of high school) compared with university (measured at the end of their first academic year), among males and females. Endurance activities included biking, cross-country skiing, floor hockey, jogging/running, ice skating, in-line

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Kosuke Tamura, Jeffrey S. Wilson, Robin C. Puett, David B. Klenosky, William A. Harper and Philip J. Troped

accelerometer data to classify intensity of PA may be better suited to specific outdoor settings such as trails, where researchers can be more certain that faster speeds are indicative of bicycling or in-line skating, versus driving a car. On average, participants in our study engaged in 45.4 minutes per day