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Ryan S. Sacko, Cate A. Egan, Jenna Fisher, Chelsee Shortt, and Kerry McIver

.g., specific, positive, general; Sacko et al., 2019 ). A rest period of no <10 min was allocated between each session to allow for appropriate recovery to resting metabolic rate ( Sedlock, Fissinger, & Melby, 1989 ). EE was measured using indirect calorimetry (COSMED K4b2; Rome, Italy). The COSMED K4b2 has been well

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David M. Wert, Jessie M. VanSwearingen, Subashan Perera, and Jennifer S. Brach

The purpose of this study was to assess the relative and absolute reliability of metabolic measures of energy expenditure and gait speed during overground walking in older adults with mobility limitations. Thirty-three (mean age [SD] = 76.4 [6.6] years; 66% female) older adults with slow gait participated. Measures of energy expenditure and gait speed were recorded during two 6-min bouts of overground walking (1 week apart) at a self-selected “usual” walking pace. The relative reliability for all variables was excellent: ICC = .81−.91. Mean differences for five of the six outcome variables was less than or equal to the respected SEM, while all six mean differences fell below the calculated MDC95. Clinicians and researchers can be confident that metabolic measures of energy expenditure and gait speed in older adults with slow walking speeds can be reliably assessed during overground walking, providing an alternative to traditional treadmill assessments.

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Karsten Koehler, Thomas Abel, Birgit Wallmann-Sperlich, Annika Dreuscher, and Volker Anneken

Background:

Inactivity and overweight are major health concerns in children and adolescents with disabilities. Methods for the assessment of activity and energy expenditure may be affected negatively by the underlying disability, especially when motor function is impaired. The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of the SenseWear Armband in adolescents with cerebral palsy and hemiparesis.

Methods:

Ten volunteers (age: 13.4 ± 1.6 years) were equipped with SenseWear Armbands on the hemiparetic and nonhemiparetic side of the body. Energy expenditure was measured at rest and during treadmill exercise (speed range: 0.85 to 2.35 m/s). Indirect calorimetry served as independent reference method.

Results:

The mean error was between −0.6 and 0.8 kcal/min and there were no significant differences between SenseWear and indirect calorimetry at any speed. Differences between body sides in expenditure (mean: −0.2 to 0.0 kcal/min) and step count (mean: −3.4 to 9.7 steps/min) were not significant.

Conclusions:

The validity of the SenseWear Armband does not appear to be negatively affected by cerebral palsy during laboratory treadmill exercise. Future field studies are necessary to assess the validity and practicability of energy expenditure and physical activity assessment in children and adolescents with physical disabilities.

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Zachary C. Pope, Nan Zeng, Xianxiong Li, Wenfeng Liu, and Zan Gao

specific models of the Fitbit and Jawbone despite the rising popularity of other smartwatches (e.g., Apple Watch). Moreover, few studies have employed indirect calorimetry as the criterion EE measure—an assessment method commonly considered the ‘gold standard’ for EE measurement ( Kenney, Wilmore

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Jingjing Xue, Shuo Li, Rou Wen, and Ping Hong

and duration is also important to meet the recommended energy expenditure requirement in the American College of Sports Medicine’s (ACSM) guidelines 9 and Chinese adult PA guidelines. 10 Doubly labeled water 11 and indirect calorimetry 12 are gold standards for measurement of energy expenditure

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Julia L. Bone and Louise M. Burke

™ activity monitors (Mini-MF; BodyMedia, Pittsburgh, PA) were worn to monitor compliance to training and to estimate total energy expenditure (SenseWear version 8; BodyMedia, Pittsburgh, PA). REE Collection Resting energy expenditure was measured using indirect calorimetry. Measurements were collected at the

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Roman P. Kuster, Daniel Baumgartner, Maria Hagströmer, and Wilhelmus J.A. Grooten

an urgent need to have such a method. We therefore highly recommend analyzing whether steady-state detection algorithms for indirect calorimetry data as used in other research areas (e.g., the analysis of steady-state energy expenditure with variable walking speeds, Plasschaert, Jones, & Forward

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Alicia Ann Thorp, Bronwyn A. Kingwell, Coralie English, Louise Hammond, Parneet Sethi, Neville Owen, and David W. Dunstan

Background:

To determine whether alternating bouts of sitting and standing at work influences daily workplace energy expenditure (EE).

Methods:

Twenty-three overweight/obese office workers (mean ± SD; age: 48.2 ± 7.9 y, body mass index: 29.6 ± 4.0 kg/m2) undertook two 5-day experimental conditions in an equal, randomized order. Participants wore a “metabolic armband” (SenseWear Armband Mini) to estimate daily workplace EE (KJ/8 h) while working (1) in a seated work posture (SIT condition) or (2) alternating between a standing and seated work posture every 30 minutes using a sit-stand workstation (STAND-SIT condition). To assess the validity of the metabolic armband, a criterion measure of acute EE (KJ/min; indirect calorimetry) was performed on day 4 of each condition.

Results:

Standing to work acutely increased EE by 0.7 [95% CI 0.3–1.0] KJ/min (13%), relative to sitting (P = .002). Compared with indirect calorimetry, the metabolic armband provided a valid estimate of EE while standing to work (mean bias: 0.1 [–0.3 to 0.4] KJ/min) but modestly overestimated EE while sitting (P = .005). Daily workplace EE was greatest during the STAND-SIT condition (mean condition difference [95% CI]: 76 [8–144] KJ/8-h workday, P = .03).

Conclusions:

Intermittent standing at work can modestly increase daily workplace EE compared with seated work in overweight/obese office workers.

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Alison L. Innerd and Liane B. Azevedo

Background:

The aim of this study is to establish the energy expenditure (EE) of a range of child-relevant activities and to compare different methods of estimating activity MET.

Methods:

27 children (17 boys) aged 9 to 11 years participated. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 routines of 6 activities ranging from sedentary to vigorous intensity. Indirect calorimetry was used to estimate resting and physical activity EE. Activity metabolic equivalent (MET) was determined using individual resting metabolic rate (RMR), the Harrell-MET and the Schofield equation.

Results:

Activity EE ranges from 123.7± 35.7 J/min/Kg (playing cards) to 823.1 ± 177.8 J/min/kg (basketball). Individual RMR, the Harrell-MET and the Schofield equation MET prediction were relatively similar at light and moderate but not at vigorous intensity. Schofield equation provided a better comparison with the Compendium of Energy Expenditure for Youth.

Conclusion:

This information might be advantageous to support the development of a new Compendium of Energy Expenditure for Youth.

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Gianluca Vernillo, Aldo Savoldelli, Barbara Pellegrini, and Federico Schena

Background:

Accurate assessments of physical activity and energy expenditure (EE) are needed to advance research on positive and negative graded walking.

Purpose:

To evaluate the validity of 2 SenseWear Armband monitors (Pro3 and the recently released Mini) during graded walking.

Methods:

Twenty healthy adults wore both monitors during randomized walking activities on a motorized treadmill at 7 grades (0%, ±5%, ±15%, and ±25%). Estimates of total EE from the monitors were computed using different algorithms and compared with values derived from indirect calorimetry methodology using a 2-way mixed model ANOVA (Device × Condition), correlation analyses and Bland-Altman plots.

Results:

There was no significant difference in EE between the 2 armbands in any of the conditions examined. Significant main effects for device and condition, as well as a consistent bias, were observed during positive and negative graded walking with a greater over- and under-estimation at higher slope.

Conclusions:

Both the armbands produced similar EE values and seem to be not accurate in estimation of EE during activities involving uphill and downhill walking. Additional work is needed to understand factors contributing to this discrepancy and to improve the ability of these monitors to accurately measure EE during graded walking.