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Hala Youssef, Carole Groussard, Sophie Lemoine-Morel, Christophe Jacob, Elie Moussa, Abdallah Fazah, Jean-Claude Pineau, Joel Pincemail, Josiane Cillard and Arlette Delamarche

This study aimed to determine whether aerobic training could reduce lipid peroxidation and inflammation at rest and after maximal exhaustive exercise in overweight/obese adolescent girls. Thirty-nine adolescent girls (14-19 years old) were classified as nonobese or overweight/obese and then randomly assigned to either the nontrained or trained group (12-week multivariate aerobic training program). Measurements at the beginning of the experiment and at 3 months consisted of body composition, aerobic fitness (VO2peak) and the following blood assays: pre- and postexercise lipid peroxidation (15F2a-isoprostanes [F2-Isop], lipid hydroperoxide [ROOH], oxidized LDL [ox-LDL]) and inflammation (myeloperoxidase [MPO]) markers. In the overweight/obese group, the training program significantly increased their fat-free mass (FFM) and decreased their percentage of fat mass (%FM) and hip circumference but did not modify their VO2peak. Conversely, in the nontrained overweight/obese group, weight and %FM increased, and VO2peak decreased, during the same period. Training also prevented exercise-induced lipid peroxidation and/or inflammation in overweight/obese girls (F2-Isop, ROOH, ox-LDL, MPO). In addition, in the trained overweight/obese group, exercise-induced changes in ROOH, ox-LDL and F2-Isop were correlated with improvements in anthropometric parameters (waist-to-hip ratio, %FM and FFM). In conclusion aerobic training increased tolerance to exercise-induced oxidative stress in overweight/obese adolescent girls partly as a result of improved body composition.

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Jacob D. Meyer, Mary S. Hayney, Christopher L. Coe, Cameron L. Ninos and Bruce P. Barrett

CRP in three out of six studies that measured CRP following training in mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), but inconsistent or null findings on other circulating immune biomarkers. However, considerable research links systemic inflammation to significant effects on brain functioning ( Dantzer

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Diana Keyhani, Bakhtyar Tartibian, Arezou Dabiri and Ana Maria Botelho Teixeira

behavior, abnormal plasma lipids, increased blood pressure, changes in body fat distribution, reduced glucose tolerance, increased sympathetic tone, endothelial dysfunction, and vascular inflammation ( Rosano, Vitale, Marazzi, & Volterrani, 2007 ). Additionally, PMW are more likely to evolve CVD because

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David C. Nieman, Francesca Ferrara, Alessandra Pecorelli, Brittany Woodby, Andrew T. Hoyle, Andrew Simonson and Giuseppe Valacchi

Prolonged and intensive exercise induces transient inflammation, and this has traditionally been measured using a variety of biomarkers, including acute phase proteins, the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio, and cytokine panels ( Nieman & Wentz, 2019 ; Nieman et al. 2019 ). Emerging evidence indicates

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Bindu P. Gopalan, Mary Dias, Karthika Arumugam, Reena R. D’Souza, Mathew Perumpil, Prasanna Kulkarni, Udaykumar Ranga and Anita Shet

neuropsychiatric disorders ( 28 ). The pathogenesis of these illnesses is attributable to the accelerated aging and immune senescence due to chronic inflammation and immune activation ( 17 ) resulting from the direct effect of HIV, microbial translocation, coinfections, and other comorbidities ( 19 ). To reduce

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Rebecca Quinlan and Jessica A. Hill

studies have investigated the efficacy of TCJ following intermittent exercise, but these studies have yielded conflicting results. No benefits of TCJ on functional performance, markers of inflammation (interleukin 6, C-reactive protein [CRP]), or oxidative stress (uric acid) were demonstrated after water

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David C. Nieman, Courtney L. Goodman, Christopher R. Capps, Zack L. Shue and Robert Arnot

( Kempf et al., 2010 ; Liang & Kitts, 2015 ; Lopez-Garcia et al., 2006 ; Tajik et al., 2017 ). In vitro indicate that CQAs have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, alleviate oxidative stress and inflammation in various animal disease models, and reduce related biomarkers in human clinical

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David C. Nieman, Courtney L. Capps, Christopher R. Capps, Zack L. Shue and Jennifer E. McBride

-Freeman & Sesso, 2014 ). Of all carotenoids studied in vitro, lycopene is the most effective singlet oxygen scavenger and exhibits quenching rates multiple times greater than beta-carotene and vitamin C ( Shi & Le Maguer, 2000 ). Human trials suggest that tomato carotenoid intake reduces systemic inflammation in

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Chantal A. Vella, Erin D. Michos, Dorothy D. Sears, Mary Cushman, Rachel B. Van Hollebeke, Michelle M. Wiest and Matthew A. Allison

, cardiovascular disease risk factors, adiposity, and markers of inflammation. Methods Participants The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) is a longitudinal cohort study of adults from 6 regions across the United States. The overall design of the MESA study has been published. 12 In brief, the cohort

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Thiago R.S. Tenório, P. Babu Balagopal, Lars B. Andersen, Raphael M. Ritti-Dias, James O. Hill, Mara C. Lofrano-Prado and Wagner L. Prado

. Various biomarkers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction have been identified and are altered in children with obesity compared with their normal weight counterparts ( 3 ). Given the high prevalence of obesity in children and adolescents, the management and/or prevention of obesity and its