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Julia L. Bone and Louise M. Burke

overnight fast is not always practical and considerations on the reliability of REE following a shorter overnight fast are yet to be done. An outpatient REE is considered to be higher than inpatient REE (which would be closer to BEE; D’Alessio et al., 1988 ). However, investigations in healthy and elderly

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Juliessa M. Pavon, Richard J. Sloane, Carl F. Pieper, Cathleen S. Colón-Emeric, David Gallagher, Harvey J. Cohen, Katherine S. Hall, Miriam C. Morey, Midori McCarty, Thomas L. Ortel and Susan N. Hastings

for any documentation of out of bed mobility, walking activity, and walking distance (feet). Accelerometer Measurement of Inpatient Activity We used the GT3x+ model ActiGraph (ActiGraph, Pensacola, FL), a widely used triaxial accelerometer designed to measure and record physical activity

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Melissa Raymond, Adele Winter and Anne E. Holland

Background:

Older adults undergoing rehabilitation may have limited mobility, slow gait speeds and low levels of physical activity. Devices used to quantify activity levels in older adults must be able to detect these characteristics.

Objective:

To investigate the validity of the Positional Activity Logger (PAL2) for monitoring position and measuring physical activity in older inpatients (slow stream rehabilitation).

Methods:

Twelve older inpatients (≥65 years) underwent a 1-hour protocol (set times in supine, sitting, standing; stationary and moving). Participants were video-recorded while wearing the PAL2. Time spent in positions and walking (comfortable and fast speeds) were ascertained through video-recording analysis and compared with PAL2 data.

Results:

There was no difference between the PAL2 and video recording for time spent in any position (P-values 0.055 to 0.646). Walking speed and PAL2 count were strongly correlated (Pearson’s r = .913, P < .01). The PAL2 was responsive to within-person changes in gait speed: activity count increased by an average of 52.47 units (95% CI 3.31, 101.63). There was 100% agreement for transitions between lying to sitting and < 1 transition difference between siting to standing.

Conclusion:

The PAL2 is a valid tool for quantifying activity levels, position transitions, and within-person changes in gait speed in older inpatients.

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Sarah J. Fraser, Justin J. Chapman, Wendy J. Brown, Harvey A. Whiteford and Nicola W. Burton

Background:

The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using questionnaires and accelerometers to measure physical activity and sedentary behavior among inpatient adults with mental illness.

Methods:

Participants completed a physical activity and sitting time questionnaire and wore an accelerometer for 7 consecutive days. Feasibility was assessed in terms of participant engagement, self-reported ease/difficulty of completing study components, extreme self-report data values and adherence to accelerometer wear time criteria. Ease/difficulty ratings were examined by level of distress.

Results:

177 inpatients were invited to the study, 101 completed the questionnaires and 36 provided valid accelerometry data. Participants found it more difficult to complete sitting time and physical activity questionnaires than to wear the accelerometer during waking hours (z = 3.787, P < .001; z = 2.824, P = .005 respectively). No significant differences were found in ease/difficulty ratings by level of distress for any of the study components. Extreme values for self-reported sitting time were identified in 27% of participants.

Conclusion:

Inpatient adults with mental illness can engage with self-report and objective methods of measuring physical activity and sedentary behavior. They were initially less willing to participate in objective measurement, which may however be more feasible than self-report measures.

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Joseph J. Gruber, John W. Hall, Stephen E. McKay, Laurie L. Humphries and Richard J. Kryscio

This investigation explored the belief that physical activity therapy has a neurological value as part of the total treatment of mental patients. Twenty-two adolescents hospitalized with depression were administered a battery of diagnostic tests. Relationships among the Braininks-Oseretsky Motor Proficiency test (12 subtest scores) and the Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery (14 subtest scores) were examined. All patients were nonmedicated and on a neurotransmitter controUed diet for 48 hours prior to testing. Results indicate that certain forms of motor performance can be predicted from measures indicative of both structure and fonction of brain behavior. The multiple R2 ranged from .80 to .06, with variance in balance, bilateral coordination, and fine motor skills being predicted from the receptive speech, tactile, right hemisphere, left hemisphere, expressive speech, motor, and rhythm measures of brain behavior. When explaining neuropsychological battery scores from motor proficiency scores, the R2 ranged from .65 to .28, with intelligence and expressive speech being predicted from the gross motor composite, upper limb speed, and dexterity, balance, and fine motor composite scores, respectively.

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Emily Arentson-Lantz, Elfego Galvan, Adam Wacher, Christopher S. Fry and Douglas Paddon-Jones

. However, in an inpatient setting, incidental activities of daily living are greatly curtailed and purposeful physical activity is often limited to comparatively brief periods of standing and/or walking ( Blocker, 1992 ; Landefeld, Palmer, Kresevic, Fortinsky, & Kowal, 1995 ; Mahoney, Sager, & Jalaluddin

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Hongjun Yu and Andiara Schwingel

activity, and an individual’s out-of-pocket expenditures. Second, few studies ( Kang & Xiang, 2017 ; Rosenberg et al., 2015 ) have focused on the impact of both sedentary behavior and physical activity on the different components of health care expenditure (i.e., outpatient care, inpatient care

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Brandon Rohrer, Susan Fasoli, Hermano Igo Krebs, Bruce Volpe, Walter R Frontera, Joel Stein and Neville Hogan

Submovements are hypothesized building blocks of human movement, discrete ballistic movements of which more complex movements are composed. Using a novel algorithm, submovements were extracted from the point-to-point movements of 41 persons recovering from stroke. Analysis of the extracted submovements showed that, over the course of therapy, patients' submovements tended to increase in peak speed and duration. The number of submovements employed to produce a given movement decreased. The time between the peaks of adjacent submovements decreased for inpatients (those less than 1 month post-stroke), but not for outpatients (those greater than 12 months post-stroke) as a group. Submovements became more overlapped for all patients, but more markedly for inpatients. The strength and consistency with which it quantified patients' recovery indicates that analysis of submovement overlap might be a useful tool for measuring learning or other changes in motor behavior in future human movement studies.

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Reinhard Fuchs, Wiebke Goehner and Harald Seelig

Background:

Little is known about the long-term effects of group intervention programs targeting physical exercise. This paper reports on the effectiveness of MoVo-LISA, a theory-based (MoVo-concept) standardized intervention program. Participants are taught cognitive-behavioral strategies of goal-setting, action planning, barrier management, and self-monitoring.

Methods:

N = 220 in-patients of an orthopedic rehabilitation clinic were assigned to the usual care group (UCG) or the intervention group (IG) (quasi-experimental design). Assessments were conducted at 5 time points.

Results:

At 12-month follow-up, level of exercise in the IG was 28.5 min/week higher than in the UCG (P = .05). Moreover, 50% of the IG was exercising for at least 60 min/week, but only 33% of the UCG (P = .01). During the 12 months after clinic discharge, patients of the IG reported the same low pain experience that they had reached at the end of the clinic stay, whereas UCG patients’ pain experience slowly reincreased.

Conclusions:

Results provide evidence that intervention programs based on the MoVo concept lead to long-term improvement in exercise behavior and health status.

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Frances A. Kanach, Amy M. Pastva, Katherine S. Hall, Juliessa M. Pavon and Miriam C. Morey

, starting in 2000 and extending through March 2015, overlaps and advances the 2007 Cochrane review by focusing exclusively on structured exercise interventions, thus allowing a more precise estimate of its isolated effects among hospitalized older adults in the inpatient setting and extends to home