Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 108 items for :

  • "intellectual disability" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Iva Obrusnikova, Haley M. Novak and Albert R. Cavalier

Musculoskeletal fitness is important for adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs) to maintain cardiovascular fitness ( Pitetti & Boneh, 1995 ); daily functional independence ( Oppewal, Hilgenkamp, van Wijck, Schoufour, & Evenhuis, 2014 ); and work task performance ( Shields & Taylor, 2010

Restricted access

Andrea R. Taliaferro and Lindsay Hammond

Individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) tend to have low rates of participation in voluntary or prescribed physical activity. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to identify the barriers, facilitators, and needs influencing physical activity participation of adults with ID within the framework of a social ecological model. A qualitative approach consisted of data collected from surveys and guided focus groups. Participants included adults with ID (n = 6) and their primary caregiver (n = 6). Barriers were categorized under three themes: organizational barriers, individual constraints, and external influences. Examples of subthemes included information dissemination, reliance on others, and caregiver considerations. Facilitators included primary caregivers as champions and camaraderie. Needs centered on family program involvement, improved programmatic structure, and programmatic support. Results indicate the need for community programs to examine barriers and facilitators applicable to their unique setting and population across all levels of a social ecological model.

Restricted access

Rosanna Gilderthorp, Jan Burns and Fergal Jones

Athletes with intellectual disabilities (ID) were re-included into the London 2012 Paralympics games. There has been much debate surrounding the rules of the Paralympic games, as all participants with ID compete against each other in the same class, ( Burns, 2017 ), despite the vast range of

Restricted access

Eliane Mauerberg-deCastro, Renato Moraes and Debra Frances Campbell

We tested the short-term effects of a nonrigid tool, identified as an “anchor system” (e.g., ropes attached to varying weights resting on the floor), on the postural stabilization of blindfolded adults with and without intellectual disabilities (ID). Participants held a pair of anchors–one in each hand, under three weight conditions (250 g, 500 g and 1,000 g), while they performed a restricted balance task (standing for 30 s on a balance beam placed on top of a force platform). These conditions were called anchor practice trials. Before and after the practice trials, a condition without anchors was tested. Control practice groups, who practiced blocks of trials without anchors, included individuals with and without ID. The anchor system improved subjects’ balance during the standing task, for both groups. For the control groups, the performance of successive trials in the condition without the anchor system showed no improvement in postural stability. The individuals with intellectual disability, as well as their peers without ID, used the haptic cues of nonrigid tools (i.e., the anchor system) to stabilize their posture, and the short-term stabilizing effects appeared to result from their previous use of the anchor system.

Restricted access

Janet Robertson, Eric Emerson, Susannah Baines and Chris Hatton

active 5 with sport also having a role in promoting psychological well-being and increasing social capital. Intellectual disability refers to a significant general impairment in intellectual functioning that is acquired during childhood, typically operationalized as scoring more than 2 standard

Full access

Ken Pitetti, Ruth Ann Miller and E. Michael Loovis

overweight and obesity ( Cairney, Hay, Faught, & Hawes, 2005 ). Pitetti, Miller, and Loovis ( 2017 ) recently assessed the gross motor proficiency of male children and adolescents with intellectual disability (ID) but without Down syndrome (DS) in areas of coordination and using the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test

Restricted access

Nathanial J. Kapsal, Theresa Dicke, Alexandre J.S. Morin, Diego Vasconcellos, Christophe Maïano, Jane Lee and Chris Lonsdale

among the least-active adolescents decrease as they get older. 10 Although this inactivity is concerning, there are groups within this population that are even less physically active than the others. Compared with their typically developing peers, youth with intellectual disabilities (characterized by

Restricted access

Bernadette L. Foster, Jeff W. Walkley and Viviene A. Temple

The purpose of this study was to describe and compare the bone mineral density of women with intellectual disability (WID) and a comparison group (WOID) matched for age and sex. One hundred and five women, ages 21 to 39, M = 29, were tested for their bone mineral density levels at the lumbar spine and three sites of the proximal femur using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. No significant difference between groups existed (λ = 0.94, F(4, 98) = 1.68, p = .16, η2 = .06); however, one-sample t tests revealed that bone mineral density for the WID group (n = 35) was significantly lower than zero at the Ward’s triangle (p < .01) and the lumbar spine (p < .05). Approximately one-quarter of WID had low bone density at these two sites, suggesting that WID may be at risk of osteoporotic fracture as they age.

Restricted access

Samantha J. Downs, Stuart J. Fairclough, Zoe R. Knowles and Lynne M. Boddy

The aim of this study was to assess the physical activity (PA) patterns of youth with intellectual disabilities (ID). PA was monitored for 7 days in 70 participants, 5–15 years old, using accelerometers. There were 32 participants included in the final analysis. Habitual PA and the number of continuous bouts accrued for a range of bout lengths (5–600 s) for light (LPA), moderate (MPA), and vigorous (VPA) PA were calculated. Multivariate analysis of covariance was used to assess differences in the number of continuous bouts by sex, age, and ID group and between week and weekend days. Participants exhibited short sporadic bursts of activity. The number of continuous bouts decreased as the intensity and duration increased. Few differences in PA patterns were reported by sex, ID group, and age group and between week and weekend days, possibly due to the generally low PA levels in this population.

Restricted access

Eli Carmeli, Tamar Bar-Yossef, Claudette Ariav, Rosy Paz, Hanna Sabbag and Ran Levy

Adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) show a greater tendency toward deconditioning and having a sedentary lifestyle than their peers without disabilities. The aim of this study was to characterize sensorimotor deficits through coordination tests and during static and dynamic balance. Eight tasks that involved the integration of hand movements with visual information were used here, as well as the Posture Scale Analyzer system to examine postural stability. During static and dynamic standing tests with the eyes closed, the postural stability of people with ID was accompanied by a small sway rate. In the ID group, the frontal plane movements were significantly larger (p > .05) than the sagittal plane movements. The participants with ID showed a significantly lower score than the control group in all the sensorimotor tests. Our observations on balance and coordination capabilities might have significance for understanding the mechanisms underlying movement dysfunction in adults with ID and offer some new approaches for their possible prevention.