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Rachel S. Mark and Ryan E. Rhodes

Background:

Interactive stationary bikes provide positive affective experiences and physiological benefits; however, research is limited.

Methods:

This study compared usage of GameBikes to traditional stationary bikes among families in the home following a 6-week randomized, controlled trial design. Parents completed questionnaires featuring constructs of the theory of planned behavior (TPB). Usage was tracked by all family members and belief elicitation with GameBike families followed the trial.

Results:

Usage across the trial was significantly different for children in favor of the GameBike group (t 36 = 2.61, P = .01, d = .85). No differences were identified for parents. Significant time effects for parents’ (F 5,48 = 5.07, P < .01; η2 = .35) and children’s (F 5,32 = 8.24, P < .01; η2 = .56) usage were found with declines across 6 weeks. Affective attitude was the only significant TPB variable between groups at both time one (t 57 = 2.53, P = .01; d = .65) and follow-up (t 52 = 2.70, P = .01; d = .74) in favor of the GameBike group. Elicited beliefs were primarily affective- and control-based.

Conclusions:

The results provide support for use of interactive video games to augment current PA initiatives. Larger-scale trials with longer durations are warranted.

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Justin A. Kraft, William D. Russell, Nathan Clark, Jessica Helm and Amanda Jackson

Background:

The ability of interactive video games (IVGs) to individualize physical demands influences their viability as a physical activity option. This study examined the influence of experience level on activity levels and affect resulting from playing a martial arts IVG.

Methods:

Twenty participants completed 3 15-minute trials: (1) walking, (2) IVG with no previous experience (INEXP), and (3) IVG activity after 2 hours of practice (EXP) during which heart rate (HR), step counts, metabolic equivalents of task (METs), ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), session RPE, and affect (positive/negative affect, enjoyment) were measured.

Results:

Mean HR was lower during walking (107 ± 18 bpm) than during INEXP (131 ± 25 bpm) and EXP (120 ± 20 bpm). Peak HR and session RPE were lower for walking than for INEXP and EXP. No difference in mean HR was observed between IVG conditions, but peak HR and session RPE were lower for EXP than for INEXP. Walking resulted in greater postactivity reduction of negative affect; however, the IVG conditions were perceived as more enjoyable.

Conclusion:

Although the current IVG provided a greater exercise stimulus than walking, results suggest that user movements become more efficient with greater IVG experience and that exercise outcomes may decrease as a result.

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Yongwoo Lee, Wonjae Choi, Kyeongjin Lee, Changho Song and Seungwon Lee

suggested that new technology, such as the Wii Fit Board (WFB) can be used for balance training using virtual reality ( Paez et al., 2012 ; Young, Ferguson, Brault, & Craig, 2011 ). Other studies have demonstrated that interactive video games such as the Wii Fit Balance Board facilitate physical ( Nitz

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Sahba Taslimipour, Zahra Rojhani-Shirazi, Ladan Hemmati and Iman Rezaei

cardiorespiratory fitness than sedentary persons. 12 Furthermore, a previous study found that VR training with interactive video games was able to improve pulmonary function. 42 Exercising with the Nintendo Wii Fit was associated with improvements in respiratory rate and mean maximum heart rate in sedentary young