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Mohamed S. Fessi, Fayçal Farhat, Alexandre Dellal, James J. Malone and Wassim Moalla

-sided games. 14 , 20 However, few studies have investigated intermittent-running training using GPS technology in professional soccer players. To the best of our knowledge, no data have been published on how the ability to rapidly change direction may influence distance covered and metabolic power. The aims

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Ian Craig Perkins, Sarah Anne Vine, Sam David Blacker and Mark Elisabeth Theodorus Willems

We examined the effect of New Zealand blackcurrant (NZBC) extract on high-intensity intermittent running and postrunning lactate responses. Thirteen active males (age: 25 ± 4 yrs, height: 1.82 ± 0.07 m, body mass: 81 ± 14 kg, V̇O2max: 56 ± 4 ml∙kg-1∙min-1, v V̇O2max: 17.6 ± 0.8 km∙h-1) performed a treadmill running protocol to exhaustion, which consisted of stages with 6 × 19 s of sprints with 15 s of low-intensity running between sprints. Interstage rest time was 1 min and stages were repeated with increasing sprint speeds. Subjects consumed capsuled NZBC extract (300 mg∙day-1 CurraNZ; containing 105 mg anthocyanin) or placebo for 7 days (double-blind, randomized, crossover design, wash-out at least 14 days). Blood lactate was collected for 30 min postexhaustion. NZBC increased total running distance by 10.6% (NZBC: 4282 ± 833 m, placebo: 3871 ± 622 m, p = .02), with the distance during sprints increased by 10.8% (p = .02). Heart rate, oxygen uptake, lactate and rating of perceived exertion were not different between conditions for the first 4 stages completed by all subjects. At exhaustion, blood lactate tended to be higher for NZBC (NZBC: 6.01 ± 1.07 mmol∙L-1, placebo: 5.22 ± 1.52 mmol∙L-1, p = .07). There was a trend for larger changes in lactate following 15 min (NZBC: -2.89 ± 0.51 mmol∙L-1, placebo: -2.46 ± 0.39 mmol∙L-1, p = .07) of passive recovery. New Zealand blackcurrant extract (CurraNZ) may enhance performance in sports characterized by high-intensity intermittent exercise as greater distances were covered with repeated sprints, there was higher lactate at exhaustion, and larger changes in lactate during early recovery after repeated sprints to exhaustion.

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Billy T. Hulin, Tim J. Gabbett, Nathan J. Pickworth, Rich D. Johnston and David G. Jenkins

Injuries adversely affect team success, 1 financial revenue, 2 and performance appraisals of science and medicine staff in team sport. 3 In rugby league players, greater high-intensity intermittent running ability is associated with (1) a higher probability of completing more matches injury free

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Calvin P. Philp, Martin Buchheit, Cecilia M. Kitic, Christopher T. Minson and James W. Fell

Purpose:

To investigate whether a 5-d cycling training block in the heat (35°C) in Australian Rules footballers was superior to exercising at the same relative intensity in cool conditions (15°C) for improving intermittent-running performance in a cool environment (<18°C).

Methods:

Using a parallel-group design, 12 semiprofessional football players performed 5 d of cycling exercise (70% heart-rate reserve [HRR] for 45 min [5 × 50-min sessions in total]) in a hot (HEAT, 35°C ± 1°C, 56% ± 9% RH) or cool environment (COOL, 15°C ± 3°C, 81% ± 10% RH). A 30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test to assess intermittent running performance (VIFT) was conducted in a cool environment (17°C ± 2°C, 58 ± 5% RH) before and twice after (1 and 3 d) the intervention.

Results:

There was a likely small increase in VIFT in each group (HEAT, 0.5 ± 0.3 km/h, 1.5 ± 0.8 × smallest worthwhile change [SWC]; COOL, 0.4 ± 0.4 km/h, 1.6 ± 1.2 × SWC) 3 d postintervention, with no difference in change between the groups (0.5% ± 1.9%, 0.4 ± 1.4 × SWC). Cycle power output during the intervention was almost certainly lower in the HEAT group (HEAT 1.8 ± 0.2 W/kg vs COOL 2.5 ± 0.3 W/kg, –21.7 ± 3.2 × SWC, 100/0/0).

Conclusions:

When cardiovascularexercise intensity is matched (ie, 70% HRR) between environmental conditions, there is no additional performance benefit from short-duration moderate-intensity heat exposure (5 × 50 min) for semiprofessional footballers exercising in cool conditions. However, the similar positive adaptations may occur in HEAT with 30% lower mechanical load, which may be of interest for load management during intense training or rehabilitation phases.

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Hervé Assadi and Romuald Lepers

Purposes:

To compare the physiological responses and maximal aerobic running velocity (MAV) during an incremental intermittent (45-s run/15-s rest) field test (45-15FIT) vs an incremental continuous treadmill test (TR) and to demonstrate that the MAV obtained during 45-15FIT (MAV45-15) was relevant to elicit a high percentage of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) during a 30-s/30-s intermittent training session.

Methods:

Oxygen uptake (VO2), heart rate (HR), and lactate concentration ([La]) were measured in 20 subjects during 2 maximal incremental tests and four 15-min intermittent tests. The time spent above 90% and 95% VO2max (t90% and t95% VO2max, respectively) was determined.

Results:

Maximal physiological parameters were similar during the 45-15FIT and TR tests (VO2max 58.6 ± 5.9 mL · kg−1 · min−1 for TR vs 58.5 ± 7.0 mL · kg−1 · min−1 for 45-15FIT; HRmax 200 ± 8 beats/min for TR vs 201 ± 7 beats/min for 45-15FIT). MAV45-15 was significantly (P < .001) greater than MAVTR (17.7 ± 1.1 vs 15.6 ± 1.4 km/h). t90% and t95% VO2max during the 30-s/30-s performed at MAVTR were significantly (P < .01) lower than during the 30-s/30-s performed at MAV45-15. Similar VO2 during intermittent tests performed at MAV45-15 and at MAVTR can be obtained by reducing the recovery time or using active recovery.

Conclusions:

The results suggested that the 45-15FIT is an accurate field test to determine VO2max and that MAV45-15 can be used during high-intensity intermittent training such as 30-s runs interspersed with 30-s rests (30-s/30-s) to elicit a high percentage of VO2max.

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Ian Rollo, George Homewood, Clyde Williams, James Carter and Vicky L. Goosey-Tolfrey

This study investigated the influence of mouth rinsing a carbohydrate solution on self-selected intermittent variable-speed running performance. Eleven male amateur soccer players completed a modified version of the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test (LIST) on 2 occasions separated by 1 wk. The modified LIST allowed the self-selection of running speeds during Block 6 of the protocol (75–90 min). Players rinsed and expectorated 25 ml of noncaloric placebo (PLA) or 10% maltodextrin solution (CHO) for 10 s, routinely during Block 6 of the LIST. Self-selected speeds during the walk and cruise phases of the LIST were similar between trials. Jogging speed was significantly faster during the CHO (11.3 ± 0.7 km·h−1) than during the PLA trial (10.5 ± 1.3 km · h−1) (p = .010); 15-m sprint speeds were not different between trials (PLA: 2.69 ± 0.18 s: CHO: 2.65 ± 0.13 s) (F(2, 10), p = .157), but significant benefits were observed for sprint distance covered (p = .024). The threshold for the smallest worthwhile change in sprint performance was set at 0.2 s. Inferential statistical analysis showed the chance that CHO mouth rinse was beneficial, negligible, or detrimental to repeated sprint performance was 86%, 10%, and 4%, respectively. In conclusion, mouth rinsing and expectorating a 10% maltodextrin solution was associated with a significant increase in self-selected jogging speed. Repeated 15-m sprint performance was also 86% likely to benefit from routinely mouth rinsing a carbohydrate solution in comparison with a taste-matched placebo.

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Nicholas Gant, Ajmol Ali and Andrew Foskett

Carbohydrate and caffeine are known to independently improve certain aspects of athletic performance. However, less is understood about physiological and performance outcomes when these compounds are coingested in a rehydration and carbohydrate-replacement strategy. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of adding a moderate dose of caffeine to a carbohydrate solution during prolonged soccer activity. Fifteen male soccer players performed two 90-min intermittent shuttle-running trials. They ingested a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CON) providing a total of 1.8 g/kg body mass (BM) of carbohydrate or a similar solution with added caffeine (CAF; 3.7 mg/kg BM). Solutions were ingested 1 hr before exercise and every 15 min during the protocol. Soccer passing skill and countermovement-jump height (CMJ) were quantified before exercise and regularly during exercise. Sprinting performance, heart rate, blood lactate concentration (La) and the subjective experiences of participants were measured routinely. Mean 15-m sprint time was faster during CAF (p = .04); over the final 15 min of exercise mean sprint times were CAF 2.48 ± 0.15 s vs. CON 2.59 ± 0.2 s. Explosive leg power (CMJ) was improved during CAF (52.9 ± 5.8 vs. CON 51.7 ± 5.7 cm, p = .03). Heart rate was elevated throughout CAF, and ratings of pleasure were significantly enhanced. There were no significant differences in passing skill, rating of perceived exertion, La, or body-mass losses between trials. The addition of caffeine to the carbohydrate-electrolyte solution improved sprinting performance, countermovement jumping, and the subjective experiences of players. Caffeine appeared to offset the fatigue-induced decline in self-selected components of performance.

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Alireza Rabbani, Mehdi Kargarfard, Carlo Castagna, Filipe Manuel Clemente and Craig Twist

adult athletes. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between accelerometer-based and HR-based training metrics and seasonal short-term (ie, over a 5-wk period) changes in high-intensity intermittent running performance in professional soccer players. Methods Subjects

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Shaun J. McLaren, Jonathan M. Taylor, Tom W. Macpherson, Iain R. Spears and Matthew Weston

improving speed, power, and high-intensity intermittent running performance in soccer players. 12 While repeated-sprint bouts (≥2 sprints with <60-s recovery) seldom occur in match play, 13 performing multiple, all-out efforts, over short distances with brief recovery periods, can elicit cardiometabolic

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In Schuster J, Howells D, Robineau J, et al, “Physical-preparation recommendations for elite rugby sevens performance,” Int J Sports Physiol Perform. 2018;13(3):255–267, https://doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2016-0728, an error was introduced that changed the meaning of the first sentence of the abstract. The word over was changed to more than. The sentence should read “Rugby sevens, a sport new to the Olympics, features high-intensity intermittent running and contact efforts over short match durations, normally 6 times across 2 to 3 d in a tournament format.” The online version of this article has been corrected.