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Emerson Franchini

process is becoming more and more science driven to increase the predictability of improvements and justify such investments. 2 Combat sports are characterized by high-intensity intermittent actions interspersed by low-intensity recovery actions or referee stoppage. Olympic combat sports can be divided

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Antonis Kesisoglou, Andrea Nicolò, Lucinda Howland, and Louis Passfield

cycling sessions is flawed, and this could explain why the relationship between TL and performance is not straightforward. However, whether an APD occurs and is consistent with changes in TL following other modes of exercise, such as running, remains to be determined. The prescription of intermittent (INT

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Paolo Menaspà, Marco Sias, Gene Bates, and Antonio La Torre

from <0.75 W·kg −1 to >7.50 W·kg −1 . 8 Additionally, in order to describe the intermittent nature of WC races, the number of efforts in which the power output remained above 7.50 W·kg −1 for at least 10 seconds were recorded. Descriptive statistics were used to report race characteristics, such as

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Mohamed S. Fessi, Fayçal Farhat, Alexandre Dellal, James J. Malone, and Wassim Moalla

, challenges, tackles, and changes of direction. 1 – 3 Intermittent high-intensity training consisting of straight-line (STL) or change-of-direction (COD) running is largely used by coaches to improve aerobic fitness and the ability to accelerate and change direction. 3 – 5 Previous findings 3 , 5 suggest

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Georges Baquet, Gregory Dupont, François-Xavier Gamelin, Julien Aucouturier, and Serge Berthoin

Intermittent exercises are frequently used by athletes to improve aerobic fitness. These are defined by exercise intensity and duration, recovery intensity and duration, number of repetitions, and number of series. Intermittent exercise is also an intrinsic characteristic of children’s spontaneous

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Aaron T. Scanlan, Ben J. Dascombe, Andrew P. Kidcaff, Jessica L. Peucker, and Vincent J. Dalbo

Purpose:

To compare game activity demands between female and male semiprofessional basketball players.

Methods:

Female (n = 12) and male (n = 12) semiprofessional basketball players were monitored across 3 competitive games. Time–motion-analysis procedures quantified player activity into predefined movement categories across backcourt (BC) and frontcourt (FC) positions. Activity frequencies, durations, and distances were calculated relative to live playing time (min). Work:rest ratios were also calculated using the video data. Game activity was compared between genders for each playing position and all players.

Results:

Female players performed at greater running work-rates than male players (45.7 ± 1.4 vs. 42.1 ± 1.7 m/min, P = .05), while male players performed more dribbling than female players (2.5 ± 0.3 vs. 3.0 ± 0.2 s/min; 8.4 ± 0.3 vs. 9.7 ± 0.7 m/min, P = .05). Positional analyses revealed that female BC players performed more low-intensity shuffling (P = .04) and jumping (P = .05), as well as longer (P = .04) jogging durations, than male BC players. Female FC players executed more upper-body activity (P = .03) and larger work:rest ratios (P < .001) than male FC players. No significant gender differences were observed in the overall intermittent demands, distance traveled, high-intensity shuffling activity, and sprinting requirements during game play.

Conclusions:

These findings indicate that gender-specific running and dribbling differences might exist in semiprofessional basketball. Furthermore, position-specific variations between female and male basketball players should be considered. These data may prove useful in the development of gender-specific conditioning plans relative to playing position in basketball.

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Aaron T. Scanlan, Neal Wen, Patrick S. Tucker, Nattai R. Borges, and Vincent J. Dalbo

Purpose:

To compare perceptual and physiological training-load responses during various basketball training modes.

Methods:

Eight semiprofessional male basketball players (age 26.3 ± 6.7 y, height 188.1 ± 6.2 cm, body mass 92.0 ± 13.8 kg) were monitored across a 10-wk period in the preparatory phase of their training plan. Player session ratings of perceived exertion (sRPE) and heart-rate (HR) responses were gathered across base, specific, and tactical/game-play training modes. Pearson correlations were used to determine the relationships between the sRPE model and 2 HR-based models: the training impulse (TRIMP) and summated HR zones (SHRZ). One-way ANOVAs were used to compare training loads between training modes for each model.

Results:

Stronger relationships between perceptual and physiological models were evident during base (sRPE-TRIMP r = .53, P < .05; sRPE-SHRZ r = .75, P < .05) and tactical/game-play conditioning (sRPE-TRIMP r = .60, P < .05; sRPE-SHRZ r = .63; P < .05) than during specific conditioning (sRPE-TRIMP r = .38, P < .05; sRPE-SHRZ r = .52; P < .05). Furthermore, the sRPE model detected greater increases (126–429 AU) in training load than the TRIMP (15–65 AU) and SHRZ models (27–170 AU) transitioning between training modes.

Conclusions:

While the training-load models were significantly correlated during each training mode, weaker relationships were observed during specific conditioning. Comparisons suggest that the HR-based models were less effective in detecting periodized increases in training load, particularly during court-based, intermittent, multidirectional drills. The practical benefits and sensitivity of the sRPE model support its use across different basketball training modes.

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Rebecca Quinlan and Jessica A. Hill

damage differs depending on the exercise stimulus, with endurance modalities associated with high metabolic costs and relatively low mechanical stress 10 compared with eccentric exercise associated with larger mechanical stress. 11 In contrast to this, intermittent exercise is shown to induce both

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Molly P. O’Sullivan, Matthew R. Nagy, Shannon S. Block, Trevor R. Tooley, Leah E. Robinson, Natalie Colabianchi, and Rebecca E. Hasson

investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of exercise intensity and sedentary computer games on physical activity compensation in preadolescent children. It was hypothesized that 20 two-minute high-intensity intermittent activity breaks would elicit a compensatory reduction in total

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Matthew Nagy, Molly O’Sullivan, Shannon Block, and Rebecca E. Hasson

’s ability to perform repeated bouts of short-duration, higher-intensity physical activity without accruing undue fatigue. Indeed, a review of studies exploring high-intensity intermittent activity in children noted that children demonstrate a rapid recovery from brief high-exertion activity and prefer to