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Popi Sotiriadou, Jessie Brouwers, Veerle De Bosscher and Graham Cuskelly

Previous studies acknowledge the importance of sporting organizations’ developing partnerships with clubs for athlete development purposes. However, there are no studies that address the way partnerships influence athlete progression and pathways. This study explores interorganizational relationships (IORs) between a tennis federation and tennis clubs in their efforts to improve player development processes. Document analysis and semistructured interviews with representatives from clubs and the Flemish federation were used. The findings show that the federation and the clubs engaged in IORs to achieve reciprocity and efficiency. The federation anticipated gaining legitimacy and asymmetry, and clubs expected to develop stability. Formal and informal control mechanisms facilitated IOR management. The conceptual model discussed in this study shows the types of IOR motives, management, and control mechanisms that drive and influence the attraction, retention/ transition, and nurturing processes of athlete development.

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Kathy Babiak, Lucie Thibault and Annick Willem

As the nature and scope of the sport industry have changed around the world, the role of interorganizational relationships (IORs) has become central to the operations of a variety of sport organizations (cf. Bingham & Walters, 2013 ; Franco & Pessoa, 2013 ; Grix & Phillpots, 2011

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Chad Seifried, Brian Soebbing and Kwame J.A. Agyemang

interorganizational relationships (IR), which Babiak and Thibault ( 2008 ) defined as “voluntary, close, long-term, planned strategic action between two or more organizations with the objective of serving mutually beneficial purposes in a problem domain” (p. 282). The literature overall emphasizes IR as purposive

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Fei Gao, Bob Heere, Samuel Y. Todd and Brian Mihalik

, the coordination and cooperation between stakeholders are of the utmost importance and that scholars should examine these temporary partnerships. Research on interorganizational relationships (IORs; Gray, 1985 ; Lee, 2001 ; Selsky & Parker, 2005 ) shows the complexity and challenges of setting up

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Kathy Babiak

Interorganizational relationships have become increasingly important for sport organizations. The purpose of this study was to explore the determinants and conditions of partnership formation in a group of collaborating nonprofit, public, and private organizations. A conceptual framework that includes the determinants of legitimacy, stability, necessity, asymmetry, reciprocity, and efficiency were used. Conditions including interdependence and presence of an interpersonal network were also explored. This research employed qualitative methods to examine partners’ reasons for developing interorganizational relationships in a sport context. For the collaborating organizations, the determinants of legitimacy, stability, reciprocity, and efficiency prevailed as important motives for relationship formation. These findings help to refine and apply contemporary theory to sport management and can be used to help manage interorganizational relationships.

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Paul Turner and David Shilbury

Environmental factors such as emerging technology, globalization, economic reform and social change are creating a background in which sporting organizations must seek to quickly adapt to manage their ongoing activities and operations. Focusing on emerging technology in the area of sport broadcasting, this research examined six preconditions for interorganizational relationship (IOR) formation from the perspective of professional football clubs in Australia. Based upon theories derived from the IOR literature, these six preconditions for IOR formation were considered to determine if emerging broadcasting technologies impact on IOR formation between Australian Football League (AFL) and National Rugby League (NRL) clubs and broadcasters. Semistructured in-depth interviews with senior managers of 11 AFL, and 10 NRL clubs were undertaken and data analyzed, coded and emergent themes identified. Results indicate that professional club managers display most of these attributes that precipitate the preconditions for IOR formation, but although these preconditions exist, there is little willingness by the clubs to formulate IORs with sport broadcasters.

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Per G. Svensson and Chad S. Seifried

Sport leaders are redefining organizational paradigms by blending elements from traditional forms of organizing. Leaders of emergent hybrid forms face unique challenges in managing tensions associated with the paradoxical elements they embody. This paper introduces the concept of hybrid organizing and examines its applicability to Sport for Development and Peace (SDP). Specifically, Battilana and Lee’s (2014) multidimensional framework is used to examine the core practices, workforce composition, organizational design, interorganizational relationships, and organizational culture of hybrid SDP entities. Findings from this exploratory empirical work with nine organizations indicate SDP hybrids operate under a multitude of legal structures yet are underlined by shared beliefs that these new forms provide better opportunities for achieving social impact and organizational sustainability. Organizational leaders appear to use a multitude of internal mechanisms for managing the seemingly paradoxical nature of hybrid organizing. Strengths and challenges associated with these efforts were revealed and are critically examined.

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Per G. Svensson and Richard Loat

interorganizational relationships. In this article, we begin to address this knowledge gap by focusing on how multistakeholders collaboratives can be better leveraged for socially transformative outcomes to be achieved in sport for development and peace (SDP). We draw on our combined experiences in SDP research

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Katherine Raw, Emma Sherry and Katie Rowe

The field of sport-for-development (SFD) has grown substantially in recent years ( Schulenkorf, Sherry, & Rowe, 2016 ). As a result, various forms of interorganizational relationships (IORs) and hybrid organizations have emerged in response to opportunities for organizations and stakeholder groups

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John Fizel and James F. Fairbank

We used the pressure-opportunity model of organizational misconduct to examine the antecedents and extent of oversigning among NCAA Division 1 (Bowl Championship Series) football programs. The model incorporates organizational and environmental pressures, opportunities, and predispositions. The data sample spans 10 years, with the total sample of teams in a given year varying from 114 to 120, with a total of 1,155 annual team observations. We found that only environmental factors were significant antecedents for oversigning. We discuss our results in the context of possible reasons why the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) ignores enforcement of its bylaws.