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Kyle Pushkarenko, Janice Causgrove Dunn, and Donna L. Goodwin

qualitative research: Problems opportunities within sport and exercise psychology . International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 11 ( 1 ), 101 – 121 . https://doi.org/10.1080/1750984X.2017.1317357 10.1080/1750984X.2017.1317357 Smith , J.A. ( 2017 ). Interpretive phenomenological analysis in

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Shani Pitcho-Prelorentzos and Michal Mahat-Shamir

, & Freeman, 2015 ). More specifically, this research was designed following the principles and guidelines of interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA; Smith, Flowers, & Larkin, 2009 ). IPA is an inductive, rather than hypotheticodeductive, approach. It places a strong emphasis on participants’ self

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Hugh Gilmore, Stephen Shannon, Gerard Leavey, Martin Dempster, Shane Gallagher, and Gavin Breslin

Recreational athletes comprise the most prevalent population using illegal Anabolic Androgenic Steroids (AAS). Despite regulatory efforts, substances are widely accessible, and most users report the experience of harmful side effects. It remains unclear why few users seek professional medical help. The aim of this study was to determine AAS users’ experience of side effects and help-seeking beliefs using an Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of six interviews. Participants were from the United Kingdom (n = 5) and United States (n = 1), had all experienced side effects, with some reporting prolonged use of AAS (>10 years) and self-manufacturing the drugs from raw ingredients. Results showed that AAS users discredit medical professionals’ competencies, and practice cognitive dissonance by avoiding challenging situations. A microculture for information-sharing has developed among AAS users who initially self-treat to counteract side effects, leaving them vulnerable to further harm. To conclude, there is an urgent need for educational interventions that outline the risky practice of unregulated AAS use and self-treatments, and the need to seek professional help. Such interventions could be developed through a co-production basis, and be implemented by current/former AAS users alongside the medical community.

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Philip D. Imholte, Jedediah E. Blanton, and Michelle M. McAlarnen

.1080/1750984X.2017.1317357 Smith , J.A. , & Osborn , M. ( 2007 ). Interpretive phenomenological analysis . In J.A. Smith (Ed.), Qualitative psychology: A practical guide to research methods (Vol. 2 , pp.  53 – 79 ). London, UK : Sage . Smoll , F.L. , & Smith , R.E. ( 1989 ). Leadership

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Darda Sales and Laura Misener

study, we adopted an interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA) approach to understand the experiences of para swimmers ( Smith, 2011 ; Smith & Osborn, 2015 ). IPA emphasizes interpretivist philosophical assumptions based on a relativist ontological perspective and constructivist epistemological

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Adam R. Nicholls, Nicholas L. Holt, and Remco C.J. Polman

The purpose of this study was to examine instances when international agegroup golfers coped effectively and ineffectively with performance-related stressors during competition. Eighteen male Irish international golfers (M age = 17 years) participated in semistructured interviews pertaining to their coping experiences during golf competition. Data were thematically analyzed using Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis (Smith & Osborn, 2003). Strategies associated with effective coping were rationalizing, reappraising, blocking, positive self-talk, following a routine, breathing exercises, physical relaxation, and seeking on-course social support. Alternatively, different types of coping responses (trying too hard, speeding up, routine changes, negative thoughts, lack of coping) were associated with ineffective coping. Theoretical and applied implications of these findings are discussed.

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Meghan S. Ingstrup, Amber D. Mosewich, and Nicholas L. Holt

The purpose of this study was to explore factors that contributed to the development of self-compassion among highly self-compassionate women varsity athletes. More specifically, the research question was: how did women varsity athletes with high self-compassion perceive they became self-compassionate? To purposefully sample participants, 114 women varsity athletes completed the Self-Compassion Scale (Neff, 2003b). Ten athletes with high self-compassion scores then participated in individual interviews and a follow-up second interview. Data were analyzed using interpretive phenomenological analysis (Smith & Osborn, 2003). Analysis produced three main themes that contributed to the development of self-compassion: (a) role of parents (seeking and receiving help from parents, parents teaching self-kindness, parents putting experiences in perspective); (b) gaining self-awareness; and (c) learning from others (peers, siblings, coaches, sport psychologists). These findings provide insights into the ways in which self-compassion can be learned and taught, and have implications for practitioners who work with women athletes.

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Homan Lee, Janice Causgrove Dunn, and Nicholas L. Holt

The purpose of this study was to explore youth sport experiences of individuals with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Participants were 6 males (mean age = 22.7 yr) with ADHD who had played 3 or more seasons in team sports during adolescence. Following interpretive phenomenological analysis methodology, each participant completed 2 semistructured interviews. Findings showed that symptoms of ADHD hampered participants’ experiences and led to negative interpersonal and performance-related consequences. On the other hand, participants reported social and stress/energy-release benefits arising from their experiences in sport. Their experiences were therefore complex, and some findings relating to social interactions appeared contradictory (e.g., negative interpersonal experiences vs. social benefits). Supportive coaches, understanding teammates, and personal coping strategies were key factors that enabled participants to realize benefits and, to some degree, mitigate negative consequences associated with their participation in sport.

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Hayley L. deBeaudrap, John G.H. Dunn, and Nicholas L. Holt

The purpose of this study was to explore female varsity athletes’ perceptions of how they developed high levels of dispositional optimism in sport. Eighty-three female varsity athletes completed a domain-specific version of the Life Orientation Test (LOT: Scheier & Carver, 1985). Nine participants (M age = 19.33 years, SD = 1.5) who had high dispositional optimism in sport then completed individual semistructured interviews. Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis methodology was used. Results showed that during childhood, participants perceived that their parents were supportive, provided feedback, and allowed them to have choice over the sports they played. During adolescence, coaches began to play an important role and participants were also able to learn about being optimistic through the positive and negative experiences they encountered. During early adulthood, participants developed personal narratives about the ways in which they approached sport with optimism.

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ZáNean McClain, E. Andrew Pitchford, E. Kipling Webster, Daniel W. Tindall, and Seo Hee Lee

. Utilizing a qualitative interpretive phenomenological analysis framework, the purpose of this study was to examine the meaning that adults with visual impairments who attended residential schools for students who are blind ascribed to their physical education experiences. Two major findings emerged from