Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 352 items for :

  • "intervention design" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Physical Activity Interventions to Reduce Metabolic Risk Factors to Cognitive Health

Darla Castelli and Christine Julien

(Figure  1 )? Smartphones, social media, and other secondary data forums enable us to collect and process data about human behavior on a scale never before imaginable ( Salganik, 2019 ). The wealth of real-world data may be pivotal in unlocking new approaches for intervention design. Figure 1 —Autonomous

Restricted access

Parent-Reported Motivators and Barriers to Participation in a Community-Based Intervention Designed for Children With Motor Skill Difficulties: A Qualitative Program Evaluation

Kyrah K. Brown, Jerrise Smith, Tamaya N. Bailey, Gennel Ortiz, Xiangli Gu, and Priscila Tamplain

benefit of play-oriented intervention design and group-based interaction ( Caçola et al., 2016 ). However, program affordability and culture can be considered novel findings in the context of community-based motor skill intervention programs and should be recognized as critical motivators for

Open access

Therapeutic Alliance and Its Potential Application to Physical Activity Interventions for Older Adults: A Narrative Review

Andrew Powell

Increasing the physical activity (PA) levels of inactive older adults to promote healthy aging and to reduce preventable health conditions is a public health priority. However, there remains uncertainty on what constitutes the most important components and characteristics of effective PA interventions for older adults, and previous research has largely focused on the cognitive and behavioral strategies they adopt to increase uptake and adherence to PA. This narrative review puts forward the novel idea, with supporting evidence, that the strength, quality, and collaborative nature of the professional–client relationship, a concept drawn from the field of psychotherapy and known as therapeutic alliance, may be a vital and foundational element of effective PA interventions. This article will offer a new understanding, and a new direction of research to aid the future conceptualization, design, and development of interventions that aim to increase the PA levels of older adults.

Restricted access

Exercise Intervention Designed to Improve Strength and Dynamic Balance among Community-Dwelling Older Adults

Ro DiBrezzo, Barbara B. Shadden, Blake H. Raybon, and Melissa Powers

Loss of balance and falling are critical concerns for older adults. Physical activity can improve balance and decrease the risk of falling. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a simple, low-cost exercise program for community-dwelling older adults. Sixteen senior adults were evaluated using the Senior Fitness Test for measures of functional strength, aerobic endurance, dynamic balance and agility, and flexibility. In addition, measures of height, weight, resting blood pressure, blood lipids, and cognitive function were obtained. Participants then attended a 10-week exercise class including stretching, strengthening, and balance-training exercises. At the completion of the program, significant improvements were observed in tests measuring dynamic balance and agility, lower and upper extremity strength, and upper extremity flexibility. The results indicate that exercise programs such as this are an effective, low-cost solution to improving health and factors that affect falling risk among older adults.

Restricted access

The Short-Term Efficacy of a Brief Motivational Intervention Designed to Increase Physical Activity Among College Students

Matthew P. Martens, Joanna Buscemi, Ashley E. Smith, and James G. Murphy

Background:

Research has shown that many college students do not meet recommended national guidelines for physical activity. The objective of this pilot study was to examine the short-term efficacy of a brief motivational intervention (BMI) designed to increase physical activity.

Methods:

Participants were 70 college students who reported low physical activity (83% women, 60% African American). Participants were randomly assigned to either the BMI condition or to an education-only (EO) condition. They completed measures of physical activity at baseline and 1-month follow-up.

Results:

Those in the BMI condition reported more vigorous-intensity physical activity at a 1-month follow-up than those in the EO condition.

Conclusions:

The findings from this study provide preliminary support for the efficacy of a BMI designed to increase physical activity among college students. Future studies should continue to examine and refine the intervention in an effort to improve health-related behaviors among this group.

Restricted access

Active Women before/after an Intervention Designed to Restore Menstrual Function: Resting Metabolic Rate and Comparison of Four Methods to Quantify Energy Expenditure and Energy Availability

Charlotte P. Guebels, Lynn C. Kam, Gianni F. Maddalozzo, and Melinda M. Manore

It is hypothesized that exercise-related menstrual dysfunction (ExMD) results from low energy availability (EA), defined as energy intake (EI)—exercise energy expenditure (EEE). When EI is too low, resting metabolic rate (RMR) may be reduced to conserve energy.

Purpose:

To measure changes in RMR and EA, using four methods to quantify EEE, before/after a 6-month diet intervention aimed at restoring menses in women with ExMD; eumenorrheic (Eumen) active controls (n = 9) were also measured.

Methods:

Active women with ExMD (n = 8) consumed +360 kcal/d (supplement) for 6 months; RMR was measured 2 times at 0 months/6 months. EI and total energy expenditure (TEE) were estimated using 7-day diet/activity records, with EA assessed using four methods to quantify EEE.

Results:

At baseline, groups did not differ for age, gynecological age, body weight, lean/fat mass, VO2max, EI and EA, but mean TEE was higher in ExMD (58.3 ± 4.4kcal/kgFFM/d; Eumen = 50.6 ± 2.4; p < .001) and energy balance (EB) more negative (–10.3 ± 6.9 kcal/kgFFM/d; Eumen=-3.0 ± 9.7; p = .049). RMR was higher in ExMD (31.3 ± 1.8 kcal/kgFFM/d) vs. Eumen (29.1 ± 1.9; p < .02). The intervention increased weight (1.6 ± 2.0kg; p = .029), but there were no significant changes in EA (0-month range = 28.2–36.7 kcal/kgFFM/d; 6-month range = 30.0–45.4; p > .05), EB (6 months = –0.7 ± 15.1 kcal/kgFFM/d) or RMR (0 months = 1515 ± 142; 6 months = 1522 ± 134 kcal/d). Assessment of EA varied dramatically (~30%) by method used.

Conclusions:

For the ExMD group, EI and weight increased with +360 kcal/d for 6 months, but there were no significant changes in EB, EA or RMR. No threshold EA value was associated with ExMD. Future research should include TEE, EB and clearly quantifying EEE (e.g.,>4 MET) if EA is measured.

Restricted access

A Controlled Evaluation of a CBPR Intervention’s Effects on Physical Activity and the Related Psychosocial Constructs Among Minority Children in an Underserved Community

Kara C. Hamilton, Mark T. Richardson, Shanda McGraw, Teirdre Owens, and John C. Higginbotham

interventions designed to increase PA behavior in children, especially underserved areas, such as the Black Belt of Alabama. Within the Black Belt, PA levels are particularly low (physical inactivity prevalence, 43.3% vs US prevalence, 25.6%), 10 and chronic disease mortality rates are high (eg

Restricted access

Developing a Theory-Driven Intervention to Challenge Coach Thinking: A Case Study

Erica Pasquini and Melissa Thompson

has shown that this training is focused on professional knowledge as opposed to inter- or intrapersonal knowledge ( Cóte & Gilbert, 2009 ). Therefore, we explored a nonformal educational intervention designed to disrupt the CEC at the second stage in a sample of coaches of competitive youth soccer

Open access

Motor Competence Among Children in the United Kingdom and Ireland: An Expert Statement on Behalf of the International Motor Development Research Consortium

Michael J. Duncan, Lawrence Foweather, Farid Bardid, Anna L. Barnett, James Rudd, Wesley O’Brien, Jonathan D. Foulkes, Clare Roscoe, Johann Issartel, Gareth Stratton, and Cain C.T. Clark

monitoring levels of MC, developing assessment tools for MC, providing innovative curriculum and intervention design to support learning and development, as well as providing advocacy for particular groups, such as those with motor impairments ( Blank et al., 2019 ). This expert statement, on behalf of the

Restricted access

Characteristics of Physical Activity Interventions for People With Visual Impairments: A Scoping Review

Soyoung Choi and JJ Pionke

. While they detailed the characteristics of the physical activity interventions and synthesized their impact on health-related outcomes, they did not address the factors deemed crucial for enhancing the inclusivity of physical activity interventions for individuals with VI. Unlike other interventions