Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 19 items for :

  • "isomorphism" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Russell E. Ward Jr.

Despite suggestions that mission statements represent a strategic component of organizational communication, there has been little research of these documents in athletic departments at U.S. colleges and universities. The purpose of this research was to explore the relationship between mission statement content and athletic department accomplishments in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I schools (N = 343). The content analysis of mission statements revealed that athletics missions do not differentiate accomplished from less accomplished athletic programs. Athletic departments with strong traditions of promoting the academic advancement of student-athletes, achieving gender equity, and complying with NCAA rules tend to reference these distinctions in the same way as departments with less favorable histories. Grounded in institutional theory, this article describes the external pressures toward sameness rather than differentiation in mission statement content. Implications for intercollegiate athletics and higher education are discussed.

Restricted access

David Cassilo and Jimmy Sanderson

Many professional sport franchises have undergone shifts in talent evaluation strategies by moving to analytic and data-driven approaches. However, National Football League (NFL) franchises have been resistant to fully embrace the analytical model, as NFL organizational management structures tend to be isomorphic. In 2016, the Cleveland Browns initiated an ideological break from this system by hiring “moneyball” guru Paul DePodesta, a move that signaled a shift to an analytics-based model in organizational management. A textual analysis of 120 online media articles was carried out to determine how media reports framed this philosophical shift. Results revealed that frames predominantly portrayed analytics as being in direct opposition to normalized operational structures in the NFL. The results illustrate how difficult it is to change the discourse and embrace new management ideas that are perceived to contrast with dominant ideologies.

Restricted access

Michael L. Naraine and Milena M. Parent

The purpose of this study was to examine sport organizations’ social-media activity using an institutional approach, specifically, to investigate the main themes emanating from Canadian national sport organizations’ (CNSOs) social-media communication and the similarities and differences in social-media use between the CNSOs. An exploratory qualitative thematic analysis was conducted on 8 CNSOs’ Twitter accounts ranging from 346 to 23,925 followers, with the number of tweets varying from 219 to 17,186. Thematic analysis indicated that CNSOs generally used tweeting for promoting, reporting, and informing purposes. Despite the organizations’ differing characteristics regarding seasonality of the sport, Twitter-follower count, total number of tweets, and whether the content was original or retweeted, themes were generally consistent across the various organizations. Coercive, mimetic, and normative isomorphic pressures help explain these similarities and offer reasons for a lack of followership growth by the less salient CNSOs. Implications for research and practice are provided.

Restricted access

Shane Pill and Brendon Hyndman

resolution. The Principle of Psychophysical Isomorphism (or “Reproductive Thinking”) is another key component of Gestalt theory. This component is based upon the suggestion that a correlation exists between conscious experiences and cerebral activity. According to Köhler ( 1970 ), a principle of reproductive

Restricted access

Robin S. Vealey

The provocative and dynamic interrelationships between the social organization of sport, sexual orientation of women participants, and their concomitant perceptions and behavior represent a fertile area for social psychological research. Sport psychologists have largely avoided, through scholarly discourse, examining lesbianism in sport thereby perpetuating “the silence so loud that it screams.” The purpose of this paper is to identify the harmful intellectual and social consequences of this silence and to advance suggestions for future research directions based on emerging epistemology and theory. It is argued that if the silence is broken using depoliticized functionalist approaches such as sex-role identification and liberal humanism, this will only exacerbate the homophobia and heterosexism that hinders our intellectual pursuit of knowledge in this area and reify the heteropatricarchal oppression of lesbians participating in sport. The rigid socially-constructed isomorphism between sport and masculinity coupled with the social stigma of lesbianism within sport may only be transformed via a paradigmatic shift from traditional functionalism toward a social constructionist approach.

Restricted access

Danny O’Brien and Trevor Slack

The organizational field that constitutes English rugby union has undergone substantial change since 1995. This paper builds on earlier work by O’Brien and Slack (2003a) that established that a shift from an amateur to a professional dominant logic in English rugby union took place between 1995 and 2000. Utilizing ideas about institutional logics, isomorphism, and diffusion, the current paper explores how this shift in logics actually evolved. Data from 43 interviews with key individuals in English rugby union form the main data source for the study. The results show that isomorphic change in accord with a new professional logic diffused throughout the field by way of three distinct diffusion patterns: status driven, bandwagon, and eventually, the social learning of adaptive responses. An initial period of high uncertainty, intense competitive pressures, and sustained financial crises resulted in unrestrained mimesis in the first two seasons of the professional era. However, this gave way in the third season to increased interorganizational linkages, coalition building, and political activity that promoted normative and coercive pressures for a consolidation of the game’s infrastructure and future development.

Restricted access

Milena M. Parent, Michael L. Naraine and Russell Hoye

’Aunno , T. , Succi , M. , & Alexander , J.A. ( 2000 ). The role of institutional and market forces in divergent organizational change . Administrative Science Quarterly, 45 , 679 – 703 . doi:10.2307/2667016 10.2307/2667016 Deephouse , D.L. ( 1996 ). Does isomorphism legitimate? Academy of

Restricted access

Landy Di Lu and Kathryn L. Heinze

). This scholarship often focuses on isomorphism in the adoption of new practices or structures ( Washington & Patterson, 2011 ) or how institutional pressures lead to conformity and homogeneity among sport organizations ( Kikulis, 2000 ; Slack & Hinings, 1994 ). For example, Slack and Hinings ( 1994

Restricted access

Matthew Juravich and Brian M. Mills

institutional theory in sport Institutional theory has been utilized frequently as a theoretical basis for sport management research. Most common, research has focused on applying an institutional theory lens in examining the impact of logics, isomorphism, and diffusion in shaping organizational actions in

Restricted access

Trygve B. Broch and Eivind Å. Skille

Secretary of NIF. The openness debate shows how legitimation is contingent upon isomorphism ( DiMaggio & Powell, 1983 ) as an ongoing and performative accomplishment ( Larsen, 2016 ). The performance of sport political power demands the skillful adaption of historically and culturally relevant culture to