Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 35 items for :

  • "isotemporal substitution" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Declan J. Ryan, Jorgen A. Wullems, Georgina K. Stebbings, Christopher I. Morse, Claire E. Stewart, and Gladys L. Onambele-Pearson

PB. Isotemporal substitution regression models recognize that time is finite by including a measure of total PB [eg, sum of waking hours SB and physical activity (PA)], which is kept constant and therefore provides the opportunity to substitute one PB for another, thereby reflecting the realities of

Full access

Rachel G. Curtis, Dorothea Dumuid, Timothy Olds, Ronald Plotnikoff, Corneel Vandelanotte, Jillian Ryan, Sarah Edney, and Carol Maher

, account for the codependent nature of time-use behaviors, and examine the outcomes associated with reallocating time between these behaviors. 7 Seminal methods of isotemporal substitution introduced by Mekary et al 8 examined the effects of substituting time in one physical activity behavior for time in

Restricted access

Miguel A. De la Cámara, Ana I. Pardos-Sevilla, Augusto Jiménez-Fuente, Thamara Hubler-Figueiró, Eleonora d’Orsi, and Cassiano Ricardo Rech

statistical approaches in epidemiology, such as isotemporal substitution analyses, offer the possibility to investigate theoretically how a change in one behavior affects MetS; they allow addressing the potential relationship of replacing time spent in one activity type to time in another activity ( Mekary

Full access

Kelsie M. Full, Eileen Johnson, Michelle Takemoto, Sheri J. Hartman, Jacqueline Kerr, Loki Natarajan, Ruth E. Patterson, and Dorothy D. Sears

. Isotemporal substitution modeling techniques 28 are used to explore how the interrelationships of daily activities may be associated with health, and to estimate the associations if a fixed amount of time spent in one activity is reallocated to another activity. In Figure  1 , we provide a conceptual example

Restricted access

Judith Godin, Joanna M. Blodgett, Kenneth Rockwood, and Olga Theou

understanding the extent that light activity may be protective for frailer individuals is important. Here, we sought to examine how much sedentary times needs to be replaced by light or moderate–vigorous physical activity in order to reduce frailty and protect against mortality by using isotemporal substitution

Restricted access

Sara Knaeps, Stijn De Baere, Jan Bourgois, Evelien Mertens, Ruben Charlier, and Johan Lefevre

increased risk for cardiometabolic diseases. 6 Recently, a relatively new method of analysis, isotemporal substitution, was introduced. This technique estimates the effect of replacing one form of behavior with another form of behavior for the same amount of time. 7 An important benefit is that it not only

Restricted access

Antonio Henrique Germano-Soares, Rafael M. Tassitano, Breno Quintela Farah, Aluísio Andrade-Lima, Marília de Almeida Correia, Aleš Gába, Nikola Štefelová, Pedro Puech-Leao, Nelson Wolosker, Gabriel Grizzo Cucato, and Raphael Mendes Ritti-Dias

between SB and PA were associated with walking capacity, the compositional version of isotemporal substitution analysis was used, 21 and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for isotemporal substitution estimates. When 95% CI did not cover 0, difference in walking capacity was considered

Restricted access

Elin Ekblom-Bak, Örjan Ekblom, Kate A. Bolam, Björn Ekblom, Göran Bergström, and Mats Börjesson

Background:

Although moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) is mainly recommended for glucose control, light physical activity (LIPA) may also have the potential to induce favorable changes. We investigated sedentary time (SED) substitution with equal time in LIPA and MVPA, and the association with markers of glucose regulation and insulin sensitivity after stratification by waist circumference, fitness and fasting glucose levels.

Methods:

A total of 654 men and women, 50 to 64 years, from the SCAPIS pilot study were included. Daily SED, LIPA and MVPA were assessed using hip-worn accelerometers. Fasting plasma glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR were determined.

Results:

Substituting 30 min of SED with LIPA was significantly associated with 3.0% lower fasting insulin values and 3.1% lower HOMA-IR values, with even lower levels when substituting SED with MVPA. Participants with lower fitness and participants with high fasting glucose levels benefited significantly more from substituting 30 min of SED with LIPA compared with participants with normal to high fitness levels and participants with normal glucose levels, respectively.

Conclusions:

LIPA, and not only MVPA, may have beneficial associations with glucose regulation. This is of great clinical and public health importance, not least because it may confer a higher compliance rate to regular PA.

Restricted access

Oleg Zaslavsky, Yan Su, Eileen Rillamas-Sun, Inthira Roopsawang, and Andrea Z. LaCroix

(continuous) and PA levels were analyzed to explore whether the relationship of PA levels on fatigue varied by body size and physical performance. Finally, isotemporal substitution models (ISM) adjusted for all covariates were executed to quantify the trade-off in substituting ST with another level of PA

Restricted access

Chad D. Rethorst, Ashley E. Moncrieft, Marc D. Gellman, Elva M. Arredondo, Christina Buelna, Shelia F. Castañeda, Martha L. Daviglus, Unab I. Khan, Krista M. Perreira, Daniela Sotres-Alvarez, and Mark Stoutenberg

Background:

The burden of depression among Hispanics/Latinos indicates the need to identify factors related to depressive symptoms. This paper examines the relationship of physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) with depressive symptoms in Hispanic/Latinos.

Methods:

The Hispanic Community Health Study / Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) is a population-based, cohort study of Hispanic/Latinos in 4 United States metropolitan areas. Objectively measured PA was coded into: sedentary behavior (SB), light-intensity (LPA), moderate-intensity (MPA), and vigorous-intensity (VPA); and the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale-10 assessed depressive symptoms. Multiple regression analysis utilizing isotemporal substitution, adjusted for relevant covariates, examined PA as predictors of depressive symptoms.

Results:

Substitution of 1 hour of SB with VPA resulted in a significant decrease in depressive symptoms (β = –1.215, P = .021). Similar decreases were observed when VPA replaced LPA (β = –1.212, P = .021) and MPA (β = –1.50 P = .034). MPA and LPA were not associated with lower depressive symptoms.

Conclusions:

Previous research has focused on the relationship of MVPA on depressive symptoms. Our results suggest these constructs should be examined separately as they may have unique relationships with depressive symptoms. The association of SB with greater depressive symptoms confirms previous reports.