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Sarah Stokowski, Bo Li, Benjamin D. Goss, Shelby Hutchens and Megan Turk

satisfied and motivated ( Wininger & Birkholz, 2013 ). Thus, understanding factors involved with sport management faculty job satisfaction and motivation levels can dually assist with retention efforts of both students and faculty, thereby potentially increasing the stability and quality of sport management

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Russell L. Carson, Michael A. Hemphill, K. Andrew R. Richards and Tom Templin

As teachers move toward the end of their careers, understanding the experiences that help them derive satisfaction from their work has implications for helping them stay engaged in teaching. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively examine the job satisfaction of late career physical education teachers. Jessica, Sandy, and Bill were later career physical education teachers (17–28 years of experience) who served as participants. All three had been colleagues at Harrisburg Middle School for 13 years. Data were collected using a job satisfaction graphing technique and qualitative interviews, and were analyzed using inductive analysis and constant comparison. Data analysis resulted in three themes related to the interactions teachers experienced with people in the school: ‘the kids and control,’ ‘our administration and marginalization,’ and ‘my fellow coworkers.’ Each theme related to both positive and negative appraisals of the teachers’ work. Implications for practice and future research are noted.

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Carrie S. Baker and Gary B. Wilkerson

Key Points ▸ The results of this study strongly support a transition from a traditional model to patient-centered care model for improved job satisfaction, decreased working hours, and improved patient care. ▸ Among athletic trainers (ATs) working in NCAA Division I athletics, a greater proportion

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Ye Hoon Lee, Hyungil Harry Kwon and K. Andrew R. Richards

-being ( Chang, 2009 ; Mérida-López & Extremera, 2017 ). Teachers with higher levels of emotional intelligence are more positive about teaching, receive more support from principals, have better teacher–student relationship, and report greater job satisfaction and less burnout at schools ( Brackett, Palomera

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K. Andrew R. Richards, Nicholas Washburn and Ye Hoon Lee

conceptual model for understanding the relationships among POS, emotional labor, affective commitment, and job satisfaction in in-service physical educators (Figure  1 ). These constructs can be explored through affective events theory (AET; Weiss & Cropanzano, 1996 ), which highlights the role of workplace

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Janet B. Parks and Luis Fernando Parra

This study investigated job satisfaction of alumnae/i of an undergraduate sport management program (N = 254). It questioned whether there would be a significant difference between job satisfaction scores of alumnae/i employed in positions related to sport and the scores of alumnae/i employed in positions unrelated to sport. Job satisfaction was measured by the Job Descriptive Index and the Job in General scales (Ironson, Smith, Brannick, Gibson, & Paul, 1989; Smith, Kendall, & Hulin, 1969). Eighty-four (71.2%) of the 118 respondents held positions related to sport and 34 (28.8%) were in positions unrelated to sport. A MANOVA with follow-up ANOVAs was used to examine differences in satisfaction scores across the “jobs related to sport/jobs unrelated to sport” distinction. Except for “satisfaction with present pay,” no significant differences were found. These results suggested that sport management alumnae/i who obtain jobs unrelated to sport may have approximately equal prospects of attaining job satisfaction as graduates who obtain jobs related to sport.

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Mike Wallace and W. James Weese

This study was undertaken to investigate the links between transformational leadership, organizational culture, and employee job satisfaction within the 69 Canadian YMCA organizations. Leadership was measured by the Leadership Behavior Questionnaire (Sashkin, 1988), organizational culture by the Organizational Culture Assessment Questionnaire (Sashkin, 1990), and employee job satisfaction by the Job in General Index (Balzer & Smith, 1990). The results of a MÁNOVA and subsequent ANOVA statistical treatments allowed the researchers to conclude that significant differences in organizational culture existed between the YMCA organizations led by high transformational leaders and YMCA organizations led by low transformational leaders. In addition, the YMCA organizations led by high transformational leaders administered organizations that carried out the culture-building activities of managing change, achieving goals, coordinated teamwork, and customer orientation to a greater degree than YMCA organizations led by low transformational leaders. No significant differences in employee job satisfaction levels existed between the YMCA organizations led by high transformational leaders and those led by low transformational leaders.

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Carey J. Snyder

The effects of leader behavior and organizational climate on the job satisfaction of intercollegiate coaches were analyzed. The 117 subjects represented 17 California colleges and universities. The instruments used in data collection were the Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire, the Organizational Climate Description Questionnaire, and the Job Descriptive Index. Statistical analysis revealed that the athletic director’s behavior and the climate had direct and indirect effects on job satisfaction. The degree of consideration shown by the athletic director had a strong effect on satisfaction with work and supervision. Coaches’ feelings of detachment and the lack of administrative support showed a negative relationship to satisfaction with work and supervision. Path analytic procedures showed male and female subjects differing with respect to the factors shaping job satisfaction. Consideration helped female coaches feel integrated into the department and supported by the administration. Male subjects viewed consideration as important to the development of morale and rapport with colleagues.

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Ming Li

Twelve organizational variables that were associated with the organizational effectiveness of spare-time sports schools in China were examined. Specifically, coaches' expressed satisfaction with their jobs and their performance was assessed, and the significant organizational correlates of these two effectiveness indicators were identified. Six hundred forty coaches participated in the study, Stepwise multiple regression analyses were carried out to determine if there were common determinants of coaches' job satisfaction and performance, The results showed that job influence, job motivation, incentive system, and leader behavior had a more pervasive influence on job satisfaction and job performance of the coaches than did other variables.

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Mei Du, Mee-Lee Leung, Frank H. Fu and Lynda Ransdell

While job stress in various occupations has gained the attention of experts in both academic research and occupational health care, there is a dearth of information about stress levels among managers in the sport and recreation industry, especially in women and in the Asian culture. Because managers are an important force in delivering sport and recreation services to citizens, the purposes of this study were to examine the job stress and job satisfaction of sport and recreation managers in Hong Kong, and to discern the relationship between stress and job satisfaction. Sport and recreation managers experienced moderate stress (M = 3.63, SD = 0.67) and were satisfied with their jobs (M = 3.79, SD = 0.64). Work relationships (Beta = −.44, p <.001), organizational climate (Beta = −.36, p <.001), home/work balance (Beta = .26, p <.01), and personal responsibility (Beta = .23, p <.01) were important determinants of their job satisfaction. A comprehensive understanding of job stress and job satisfaction is important for minimizing the impact of potential stressors on today’s workforce.