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Adapted Physical Education Teachers’ Job Satisfaction

Minhyun Kim, José A. Santiago, Chan Woong Park, and Emily A. Roper

Over the last few decades, teachers’ job satisfaction has received a significant amount of attention in the field of education. Evidence suggests that teachers are increasingly dissatisfied with their jobs and have significantly higher levels of turnover than other professions ( Edinger & Edinger

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Work Motivation and Job Satisfaction of Sport Management Faculty Members

Sarah Stokowski, Bo Li, Benjamin D. Goss, Shelby Hutchens, and Megan Turk

satisfied and motivated ( Wininger & Birkholz, 2013 ). Thus, understanding factors involved with sport management faculty job satisfaction and motivation levels can dually assist with retention efforts of both students and faculty, thereby potentially increasing the stability and quality of sport management

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Exploring the Job Satisfaction of Late Career Secondary Physical Education Teachers

Russell L. Carson, Michael A. Hemphill, K. Andrew R. Richards, and Tom Templin

As teachers move toward the end of their careers, understanding the experiences that help them derive satisfaction from their work has implications for helping them stay engaged in teaching. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively examine the job satisfaction of late career physical education teachers. Jessica, Sandy, and Bill were later career physical education teachers (17–28 years of experience) who served as participants. All three had been colleagues at Harrisburg Middle School for 13 years. Data were collected using a job satisfaction graphing technique and qualitative interviews, and were analyzed using inductive analysis and constant comparison. Data analysis resulted in three themes related to the interactions teachers experienced with people in the school: ‘the kids and control,’ ‘our administration and marginalization,’ and ‘my fellow coworkers.’ Each theme related to both positive and negative appraisals of the teachers’ work. Implications for practice and future research are noted.

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Passion for Work and Job Satisfaction in Sports Coaches: The Mediating Role of Flow Experiences

Evandro Morais Peixoto, Bartira Pereira Palma, Amanda Rizzieri Romano, Tatiana Cristina Henrique Vieira, and Larissa Rafaela Galatti

performance, also affecting athletes and teams ( Lafrenière et al., 2011 ). Additionally, the way coaches engage in work can also cause dysfunctional results, such as burnout and emotional exhaustion, or more  functional results, such as job satisfaction ( Lee & Cho, 2021 ; Pawsey et al., 2021 ). Thus

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Comparison of Athletic Trainer Stress and Job Satisfaction with Different Models of Care Delivery

Carrie S. Baker and Gary B. Wilkerson

Key Points ▸ The results of this study strongly support a transition from a traditional model to patient-centered care model for improved job satisfaction, decreased working hours, and improved patient care. ▸ Among athletic trainers (ATs) working in NCAA Division I athletics, a greater proportion

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Emotional Intelligence, Unpleasant Emotions, Emotional Exhaustion, and Job Satisfaction in Physical Education Teaching

Ye Hoon Lee, Hyungil Harry Kwon, and K. Andrew R. Richards

-being ( Chang, 2009 ; Mérida-López & Extremera, 2017 ). Teachers with higher levels of emotional intelligence are more positive about teaching, receive more support from principals, have better teacher–student relationship, and report greater job satisfaction and less burnout at schools ( Brackett, Palomera

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Understanding Emotional Labor in Relation to Physical Educators’ Perceived Organizational Support, Affective Commitment, and Job Satisfaction

K. Andrew R. Richards, Nicholas Washburn, and Ye Hoon Lee

conceptual model for understanding the relationships among POS, emotional labor, affective commitment, and job satisfaction in in-service physical educators (Figure  1 ). These constructs can be explored through affective events theory (AET; Weiss & Cropanzano, 1996 ), which highlights the role of workplace

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The Relationships Among Perceived Organization Support, Resilience, Perceived Mattering, Emotional Exhaustion, and Job Satisfaction in Adapted Physical Educators

K. Andrew R. Richards, Wesley J. Wilson, Steven K. Holland, and Justin A. Haegele

), resilience, perceived mattering, emotional exhaustion, and job satisfaction in APE teachers. We developed and tested a conceptual framework grounded in role socialization theory ( Richards, 2015 ), using structural equation modeling (SEM). Role Socialization Theory Role socialization theory is a sociological

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The Effect of the Model of Organizational Infrastructure on Collegiate Athletic Trainer Job Satisfaction: A Critically Appraised Topic

Emily A. Hall, Dario Gonzalez, and Rebecca M. Lopez

Clinical Scenario Several studies 1 – 4 have examined collegiate athletic trainer job satisfaction from various angles. In addition, advocating for patient-centered medicine has been a prevalent topic in the healthcare community at large. However, research examining the organizational hierarchy of

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Job Satisfaction of Sport Management Alumnae/i

Janet B. Parks and Luis Fernando Parra

This study investigated job satisfaction of alumnae/i of an undergraduate sport management program (N = 254). It questioned whether there would be a significant difference between job satisfaction scores of alumnae/i employed in positions related to sport and the scores of alumnae/i employed in positions unrelated to sport. Job satisfaction was measured by the Job Descriptive Index and the Job in General scales (Ironson, Smith, Brannick, Gibson, & Paul, 1989; Smith, Kendall, & Hulin, 1969). Eighty-four (71.2%) of the 118 respondents held positions related to sport and 34 (28.8%) were in positions unrelated to sport. A MANOVA with follow-up ANOVAs was used to examine differences in satisfaction scores across the “jobs related to sport/jobs unrelated to sport” distinction. Except for “satisfaction with present pay,” no significant differences were found. These results suggested that sport management alumnae/i who obtain jobs unrelated to sport may have approximately equal prospects of attaining job satisfaction as graduates who obtain jobs related to sport.