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Jaye K. Luke and Joanna L. Morrissey

Many universities have limited resources yet aim to provide worthy learning opportunities to their students. This goal can be met through the offering of alternative delivery methods and service learning. Alternative delivery methods have evolved as technology has advanced. This paper addresses the benefits of blended learning for students, faculty, and universities. Through an institutional grant emphasizing innovative teaching strategies, the authors explain how a kinesiology course that includes service learning was transformed from a face-to-face class to a blended learning environment. Two flagship assignments are explained and comments from students are shared.

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Charity Bryan

The proliferation of online courses and programs has impacted kinesiology programs across the country. The process of providing online instruction, while popular with students, is often daunting to the kinesiology programs that must navigate this process. Recommendations for transitioning courses and programs from face-to-face to online are offered from both the faculty and administrative perspective. Maintaining academic rigor in online kinesiology courses and program is also essential to the dialogue and for ensuring success. Many kinesiology courses and programs are well suited for online delivery and demand for these programs is high. Kinesiology faculty and administrators should understand both the facilitators and barriers to online implementation.

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Maureen M. Smith and Katherine M. Jamieson

Traditional histories of kinesiology generally read as chronological narratives of progress that highlight advancements in performance and technology; pioneering work by faculty and coaches (all White and very often male); the role of physical education in solving America’s crises of masculinity and military preparedness, and now obesity; and finally, stories of harmonious integration where sport serves as a meritocracy and level playing field. These narratives of progress remain prominent in many of the histories of our subdisciplines. Seven “snapshots” of moments in the history of kinesiology are utilized to illustrate often marginalized histories that reflect the profession’s role in creating and reinforcing racial hierarchies. Concluding remarks outline an anti-racist framing of kinesiology that may be worth pondering and outlining, especially as a way to link our subdisciplinary inquiries toward a goal of enhancing quality of life through meaningful, life-long physical activity for all.

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Paul Keiper and Richard B. Kreider

Online education has become an increasingly popular means of delivering educational programs in health and kinesiology. It has helped departments meet increasing enrollment demands and provided additional resources that support students and faculty. A number of challenges, however, are associated with developing these types of programs. The purpose of this paper is to discuss some of the issues that Texas A&M University has experienced in developing extensive online courses and distance education programs. The paper discusses methods and models employed to develop online and distance programs in health and kinesiology and provides a case study of some of the opportunities and challenges that the Sport Management Division experienced in developing an online master's program. Issues related to efficacy, management, funding, and student success are discussed. Health and kinesiology administrators should consider these issues as they look to develop or grow online course offerings in the discipline.

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Hal A. Lawson and R. Scott Kretchmar

Debates-as-battles have characterized the histories of physical education and kinesiology. This colorful part of the field’s history was characterized by leaders’ narrow, rigid views, and it paved the way for divisiveness, excessive specialization, and fragmentation. Today’s challenge is to seek common purpose via stewardship-oriented dialogue, and it requires a return to first order questions regarding purposes, ethics, values, moral imperatives, and social responsibilities. These questions are especially timely insofar as kinesiology risks running on a kind of automatic pilot, seemingly driven by faculty self-interests and buffered from consequential changes in university environments and societal contexts. A revisionist history of kinesiology’s origins and development suggests that it can be refashioned as a helping discipline, one that combines rigor, relevance, and altruism. It gives rise to generative questions regarding what a 21st century discipline prioritizes and does, and it opens opportunity pathways for crossing boundaries and bridging divides. Three sets of conclusions illuminate unrealized possibilities for a vibrant, holistic kinesiology—a renewed discipline that is fit for purpose in 21st century contexts.

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Gerard L. Hanley

A framework to advance and sustain the American Kinesiology Association community's capabilities to put educational innovations into practice through the use of MERLOT's open educational services and resources (www.merlot.org) is presented through the metaphor of a folk tale, Stone Soup. The American Kinesiology Association can use MERLOT's free and open library services to build a quality collection of peer-reviewed instructional materials in kinesiology, design a custom “teaching commons” website for their community to share exemplary practices, use MERLOT Voices online community platform to enable asynchronous discussions and collaborations, and create new open educational resources with MERLOT's Content Builder tool. Leveraging the California State University's Course Redesign with Technology program and the Quality Online Learning and Teaching (QOLT) project can become part of the American Kinesiology Association's strategy as well.

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Derek T. Smith, Tannah Broman, Marcus Rucker, Cecile Sende and Sarah Banner

kinesiology, exploring “not only the biological, medical, and health-related aspects of human movement, but also psychological, social-humanistic, and professional perspectives” ( Chodzko-Zajko, 2014 ), layers on an additional breadth challenge for academic advisors. From the early fitness leadership and

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Wojtek Chodzko-Zajko, Erica M. Taylor and T. Gilmour Reeve

The American Kinesiology Association (AKA), established in 2007, promotes kinesiology as a unified field of study focused on advancing our discipline and its many career opportunities ( Morrow & Thomas, 2010 ). The AKA has become the leading organization working to define kinesiology as the

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Mark Urtel, Sara F. Michaliszyn and Craig Stiemsma

). When it comes to internships in kinesiology, one could argue we have mirrored this medical school model. Outside of student teaching, it is not exactly clear when internships started in kinesiology. The most accessible references came from the literature in the 1980s and 1990s. However, apprenticeships

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Bradley J. Cardinal

The founders of the National Academy of Kinesiology were active participants in fostering international awareness and cross-cultural understanding. In fact, each of the first five academy fellows wrote about or were otherwise involved in international work. Fellow 1, Hetherington ( 1934