Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 20 items for :

  • "knee moment" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Nicholas H. Yang, Paul K. Canavan and Hamid Nayeb-Hashemi

Subject-specific models were developed and finite element analysis was performed to observe the effect of the frontal plane tibiofemoral angle on the normal stress, Tresca shear stress and normal strain at the surface of the knee cartilage. Finite element models were created for three subjects with different tibiofemoral angle and physiological loading conditions were defined from motion analysis and muscle force mathematical models to simulate static single-leg stance. The results showed that the greatest magnitude of the normal stress, Tresca shear stress and normal strain at the medial compartment was for the varus aligned individual. Considering the lateral knee compartment, the individual with valgus alignment had the largest stress and strain at the cartilage. The present investigation is the first known attempt to analyze the effects of tibiofemoral alignment during single-leg support on the contact variables of the cartilage at the knee joint. The method could be potentially used to help identify individuals most susceptible to osteoarthritis and to prescribe preventive measures.

Restricted access

J. Craig Garrison, Joe M. Hart, Riann M. Palmieri, D. Casey Kerrigan and Christopher D. Ingersoll

Context:

Gender differences in muscle activity during landing have been studied as a possible contributing factor to the greater incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in women.

Objective:

To compare root-mean-square (RMS) electromyography (EMG) of selected lower extremity muscles at initial contact (IC) and at peak knee internal-rotation (IR) moment in men and women during landing.

Design:

Preexperimental design static-group comparison.

Setting:

Motion-analysis laboratory.

Participants:

16 varsity college soccer players (8 men, 8 women).

Main Outcome Measures:

EMG activity of the gluteus medius, lateral hamstrings, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris during landing.

Results:

When RMS EMG of all muscles was considered simultaneously, no significant differences were detected between genders at IC or at peak knee IR moment.

Conclusion:

Male and female college soccer players display similar relative muscle activities of the lower extremity during landing. Gender landing-control parameters might vary depending on the technique used to analyze muscle activity.

Restricted access

Dorsey Shelton Williams and Wesley Isom

Knee varus position and motion have been correlated with increased medial knee loading during gait. The purpose of this study is to determine whether runners with excessive varus excursion (EVE) at the knee demonstrate frontal plane knee and hip kinetics that are different from those of runners with normal varus excursion (NVE). Twelve runners with EVE were compared with 12 NVE subjects using three-dimensional kinematics and kinetics. Frontal plane angles and moments were compared at the knee and hip. Runners with EVE had significantly greater abductor moment of the knee (p = .004) and lower peak abductor moment of the hip (p = .047). Runners with EVE demonstrate knee and hip mechanics thought to be associated with increased medial tibiofemoral loading. Further understanding of how changing hip abductor moments may affect changes in knee abductor moments during running may potentially lead to interventions that augment long-term risk of injury.

Restricted access

Kerry E. Costello, Janie L. Astephen Wilson, William D. Stanish, Nathan Urquhart and Cheryl L. Hubley-Kozey

and clinical outcome within the same population and time frame compared with those without progression for each outcome. Our objective was to determine differences in baseline 3D knee moment and electromyography (EMG) waveform features between progression and no progression groups using radiographic

Restricted access

Anh-Dung Nguyen, Jeffrey B. Taylor, Taylor G. Wimbish, Jennifer L. Keith and Kevin R. Ford

% distribution of hip moment and less % distribution of knee moment compared with the KA group during the DVJ and SLL. No significant differences were observed between groups for % distribution of ankle moment during the landing tasks. External knee abduction moment was significantly less in the HIP group

Restricted access

Brian Campbell, James Yaggie and Daniel Cipriani

Context:

Functional knee braces (FKB) are used prophylactically and in rehabilitation to aide in the functional stability of the knee.

Objective:

To determine if alterations in select lower extremity moments persist throughout a one hour period in healthy individuals.

Design:

2X5 repeated measures design.

Setting:

Biomechanics Laboratory.

Subjects:

Twenty subjects (14 male and 6 female, mean age 26.5±7 yrs; height 172.4±13 cm; weight 78.6±9 kg), separated into braced (B) and no brace (NB) groups.

Intervention:

A one-hour exercise program divided into three 20 minute increments.

Main Outcome Measures:

Synchronized three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic data were collected at 20-minute increments to assess the effect of the FKB on select lower extremity moments and vertical ground reaction forces.

Results:

Increase in hip moment and a decrease in knee moment were noted immediately after brace application and appeared to persist throughout a one hour bout of exercise.

Conclusions:

The FKB and the exercise intervention caused decreases in knee joint moments and increases in hip joint moments.

Restricted access

Jiping Shih, Y. Tai Wang and Manssour H. Moeinzadeh

The purpose of this project was to explore the interaction between kinematic and kinetic factors and to investigate whether this relationship was affected by different speed conditions when subjects exercised on stair-climbing machines A secondary purpose was to determine if there were any differences in kinematic and kinetic factors between experienced and inexperienced subjects The kinematic parameters included hip angle, knee angle, and pedal angle The kinetic parameters were maximum force applied on the pedals, maximum force applied on the handrails, maximum hip moment, and maximum knee moment Data from a two-way (Speed × Experience) analysis of variance suggested that there were significant differences in maximum force applied on the pedal maximum force applied on the handrail and maximum hip moment across the speed and experience conditions. In all the testing conditions, using a stair-climbing machine had a smaller impact force on the feet than was found in a previous study that examined impact force for fast walking on a level surface.

Restricted access

Henrik Koblauch, Thomas Heilskov-Hansen, Tine Alkjær, Erik B. Simonsen and Marius Henriksen

It is unclear how rotations of the lower limb affect the knee joint compression forces during walking. Increases in the frontal plane knee moment have been reported when walking with internally rotated feet and a decrease when walking with externally rotated feet. The aim of this study was to investigate the knee joint compressive forces during walking with internal, external and normal foot rotation and to determine if the frontal plane knee joint moment is an adequate surrogate for the compression forces in the medial and lateral knee joint compartments under such gait modifications. Ten healthy males walked at a fixed speed of 4.5 km/h under three conditions: Normal walking, internally rotated and externally rotated. All gait trials were recorded by six infrared cameras. Net joint moments were calculated by 3D inverse dynamics. The results revealed that the medial knee joint compartment compression force increased during external foot rotation and the lateral knee joint compartment compression force increased during internal foot rotation. The increases in joint loads may be a result of increased knee flexion angles. Further, these data suggest that the frontal plane knee joint moment is not a valid surrogate measure for knee joint compression forces but rather indicates the medial-to-lateral load distribution.

Restricted access

Graham E. Caldwell, James M. Hagberg, Steve D. McCole and Li Li

Lower extremity joint moments were investigated in three cycling conditions: level seated, uphill seated and uphill standing. Based on a previous study (Caldwell, Li, McCole, & Hagberg, 1998), it was hypothesized that joint moments in the uphill standing condition would be altered in both magnitude and pattern. Eight national caliber cyclists were filmed while riding their own bicycles mounted to a computerized ergometer. Applied forces were measured with an instrumented pedal, and inverse dynamics were used to calculate joint moments. In the uphill seated condition the joint moments were similar in profile to the level seated but with a modest increase in magnitude. In the uphill standing condition the peak ankle plantarflexor moment was much larger and occurred later in the downstroke than in the seated conditions. The extensor knee moment that marked the first portion of the down-stroke for the seated trials was extended much further into the downstroke while standing, and the subsequent knee flexor moment period was of lower magnitude and shorter duration. These moment changes in the standing condition can be explained by a combination of more forward hip and knee positions, increased magnitude of pedal force, and an altered pedal force vector direction. The data support the notion of an altered contribution of both muscular and non-muscular sources to the applied pedal force. Muscle length estimates and muscle activity data from an earlier study (Li & Caldwell, 1996) support the unique roles of mono-articular muscles for energy generation and bi-articular muscles for balancing of adjacent joint moments in the control of pedal force vector direction.

Restricted access

Karl F. Orishimo and Ian J. Kremenic

The objective of this study was to measure adaptations in landing strategy during single-leg hops following thigh muscle fatigue. Kinetic, kinematic, and electromyographic data were recorded as thirteen healthy male subjects performed a single-leg hop in both the unfatigued and fatigued states. To sufficiently fatigue the thigh muscles, subjects performed at least two sets of 50 step-ups. Fatigue was assessed by measuring horizontal hopping ability following the protocol. Joint motion and loading, as well as muscle activation patterns, were compared between fatigued and unfatigued conditions. Fatigue significantly increased knee motion (p = 0.012) and shifted the ankle into a more dorsiflexed position (p = 0.029). Hip flexion was also reduced following fatigue (p = 0.042). Peak extension moment tended to decrease at the knee and increase at the ankle and hip (p = 0.014). Ankle plantar flexion moment at the time of peak total support moment increased from 0.8 (N⋅m)/kg (SD, 0.6 [N⋅m]/kg) to 1.5 (N⋅m)/kg (SD, 0.8 [N⋅m]/kg) (p = 0.006). Decreased knee moment and increased knee flexion during landings following fatigue indicated that the control of knee motion was compromised despite increased activation of the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris (p = 0.014, p = 0.014, and p = 0.017, respectively). Performance at the ankle increased to compensate for weakness in the knee musculature and to maintain lower extremity stability during landing. Investigating the biomechanical adaptations that occur in healthy subjects as a result of muscle fatigue may give insight into the compensatory mechanisms and loading patterns occurring in patients with knee pathology. Changes in single-leg hop landing performance could be used to demonstrate functional improvement in patients due to training or physical therapy.