Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,852 items for :

Clear All
Restricted access

Lea-Cathrin Dohme, Alexandra J. Rankin-Wright and Sergio Lara-Bercial

of research conducted within coach education and development (CED) contexts ( McQuade & Nash, 2015 ). Much of this research has focussed on how coaches learn, providing detailed insight into the sources and ways of learning coaches value throughout their development ( Deek, Werthner, Paquette

Restricted access

Luke Oldridge, Lee Nelson, Kenny Greenough and Paul Potrac

This paper examines how the learning biography of Jack (pseudonym), an experienced track and field athletics coach, shaped his thoughts about coaching practice. Data were collected through seven in-depth, semistructured, narrative-biographical interviews that formed part of a cyclical and iterative data analysis process. Our analysis of Jack’s narrative revealed how his understanding of two distinct features of his coaching practice (i.e., implementation of periodization and pedagogical delivery style) developed in contrasting ways. Jack’s story was primarily, although not exclusively, interpreted using Alheit’s concepts of biographical learning and biographicity, Biesta and Tedder’s writings on agency and learning in the life-course, and Jarvis’ discussion of learning as a process of becoming. The findings of this study raise significant questions for how the field of sports coaching seeks to understand coach learning.

Restricted access

Angela Lumpkin

get students to complete readings and discuss their learning, through peer teaching while formulating responses to teachers’ questions, and in formative assessments. Every lecture could begin with one or more questions and end with a series of questions raised or left unanswered ( Brookfield

Restricted access

Kyle Paquette and Pierre Trudel

The complexities of learning and sport coaching have both been widely accepted notions and central themes to their respective literatures for decades (e.g.,  Rogers, 1969 ; Smith, Smoll, & Hunt, 1977 ). Despite being equipped with these fundamental understandings, programs designed to educate

Restricted access

Jia Yi Chow, Keith Davids, Chris Button and Robert Rein

From a nonlinear dynamics perspective, presence of movement variability before a change in preferred movement patterns is hypothesized to afford the necessary adaptability and flexibility for seeking novel functional behaviors. In this study, four novice participants practiced a discrete multiarticular movement for 12 sessions over 4 weeks. Cluster analysis procedures revealed how changes between preferred movement patterns were affected with and without the presence of variability in movement clusters before a defined change. Performance improved in all participants as a function of practice. Participants typically showed evidence of change between preferred movement clusters and higher variability in the use of movement clusters within a session. However, increasing variability in movement clusters was not always accompanied by transition from one preferred movement cluster to another. In summary, it was observed that intentional and informational constraints play an important role in influencing the specific pathway of change for individual learners as they search for new preferred movement patterns.

Restricted access

Andrew P. Driska

received theoretical guidance in its construction, as scholarship often demands that programs are evaluated under the guidance of a theoretical framework or a theory of learning. In the absence of an overt guiding theory of learning, a program evaluator may often discern a theory in use ( Patton, 2011

Restricted access

Kyle Paquette and Pierre Trudel

positivist learning assumptions, the mission of the instruction paradigm is to deliver quality instruction and to transfer quantifiable bits of knowledge from faculty to students ( Barr & Tagg, 1995 ). Moreover, the criteria for success of this paradigm include curriculum development and student completion

Restricted access

Peter F. Bodary and M. Melissa Gross

There is strong evidence that active learning outperforms passive learning when it comes to student achievement ( Freeman et al., 2014 ). This is certainly evident in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) disciplines, and entire curricula have been established around the overall

Restricted access

Karen E. Collins, Catherine E. Overson and Victor A. Benassi

Active learning strategies that engage undergraduate preservice coaching education students in practical, authentic contexts might include peer coaching, supervised “in-service” coaching, and content teaching. Promoting student engagement by adopting active learning during the classroom, content

Restricted access

Adam Cohen and Calvin Nite

Teaching methodologies within higher learning have constantly evolved over time. Although traditional practices (i.e., lectures, tests) still dominate most classrooms in higher learning, many faculty members have utilized new practices to engage their students ( Kolb & Kolb, 2005 ). In particular