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Crazy legs

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Leg lifts

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Matthew J. Major, José L. Zavaleta and Steven A. Gard

contributing factors such as muscle effort to support body weight and swing the arms and legs, 8 , 42 emphasizing the need for future work in this context to better define the relationships between pylon stiffness and metabolic cost. It is interesting to note that for at least push-off work the statistical

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Leg Swings Back

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Leg Swings Forward

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Leg Swings Wide

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Scott R. Brown, Matt Brughelli and Seth Lenetsky

scores. In this sporting context, it has been suggested ( Emery, 2003 ; McKeon & Hertel, 2008 ) that the single-leg balance most accurately replicates sporting movements and may better encompass an athlete’s potential to maintain balance as opposed to bilateral (two-legged) balance. Further, as athletes

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Body Isolations - Legs and Feet

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Lachlan E. Garrick, Bryce C. Alexander, Anthony G. Schache, Marcus G. Pandy, Kay M. Crossley and Natalie J. Collins

Dynamic single-leg control of the lower limb during running and related sports, such as football and field hockey, may contribute to the development and persistence of lower limb pain and injury. 1 One of the most prominent features of poor single-leg control is dynamic (or apparent) knee valgus

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Loren Z.F. Chiu and Amy N. Moolyk

Joint kinematics differ between jump and drop landings and there is evidence that segment kinematics may also be different. The purpose of this research was to compare lower extremity segment kinematics for jump and drop landings, and to examine if multiple days of practice would influence these kinematics. Men (n = 9) and women (n = 15) performed 4 sessions of jump and drop landings (40 cm and 60 cm) in a motion-capture laboratory. Segment kinematics at initial contact, foot flat, and peak knee flexion were compared between landing types and across visits. At initial contact, foot plantar flexion was greater in jump versus drop landings (P < .05). At initial contact and foot flat, forward leg inclination and pelvis flexion were greater in jump landing (P < .05), while thigh flexion was greater in drop landings (P > .05). The differences in leg and thigh angles at initial contact and foot flat altered lower extremity posture. These results are in contrast to a previous study; this suggests that drop landing can be modified to have the same mechanics as jump landing. As practice did not influence drop landing mechanics (P > .05), specific control strategies and instructions need to be identified.