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Clifford J. Mallett and Tristan J. Coulter

Little in-depth knowledge is known about the person behind successful coaching. Therefore, the current study was designed to comprehensively examine the personality of a successful Olympic coach. Using McAdams’ whole-person framework, we sought to elicit a coherent description of this coach’s personality by integrating data drawn from three layers of personality: (i) dispositional traits, (ii) personal strivings, and (iii) narrative identity. The findings suggest that, compared with the norm, the participant coach is emotionally stable, agreeable, conscientious, and open to new experiences. His achievement and power strivings shape his motivational agenda as a coach. His narrative identity identifies many redemptive sequences that speak of a coach who is seeking to redeem his failures as an athlete, to feel special, and who invests himself wholeheartedly into developing others to help fulfill their potential. Overall, the study, incorporating McAdams’ personality framework, provided a deep understanding of the person as a coach. We were able to garner insights about how this individual typically behaves, what guides and structures his coaching priorities, and how he has made sense of his life experiences that are fundamental to his investment in coaching and winning. Tentative implications for coaches and coach developers are presented.

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Shani Pitcho-Prelorentzos and Michal Mahat-Shamir

nature of the experience of retirement in such circumstances severely damages participants’ subjective system of meaning and thereby disrupts the coherence of their life narrative. As a result, participants were required to create meaning regarding their experience of retirement and to reauthor their

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Douglas A. Kleiber and Stephen C. Brock

In a previous investigation of the factors that make for a satisfying “exit” from organized sport (Kleiber, Greendorfer, Blinde, & Samdahl, 1987), it was determined that the only predictor of life satisfaction in the years following departure from formal participation was whether one had sustained a career-ending injury. By examining degree of investment in playing professional sports and the academic orientation of that earlier sample, it was possible in the current study to refine the profile of those vulnerable to subsequent depression of well-being (as reflected in lower life satisfaction and self-esteem). Of athletes who had been injured, only those who had an investment in playing professional sport were likely to show lower selfesteem and life satisfaction 5 to 10 years later. The disruption to a “life narrative” that is suggested by these findings argues for a more interpretive approach to research on and treatment of injury and illness among athletes and others.

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Noora J. Ronkainen, Tatiana V. Ryba, and Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson

also emphasizing embodied and prereflective ways of inhabiting lived space ( Felder & Robbins, 2011 ). As Yanchar ( 2015 ) noted about the role of narrative in phenomenological thinking: Concernful involvement unfolds along the lines of a life narrative and entails concern about the projects of life

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Matthew J Smith and Oliver R. Runswick

 al., 1997 ). Narrative learning theory ( Frank, 2010 ) focuses on the use of stories to make sense of the complexity of life. Narratives can guide our attention, affect how we behave and think, and encourage imagination to allow practitioners to identify with the characters and scenario presented

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Anna Kavoura, Alex Channon, and Marja Kokkonen

for challenging the gender binary when people of all genders practice together and gender-inclusive language and practices are used by the coaches. As Halberstam ( 2005 ) has argued, gender-inclusive (sporting) spaces have the potential to open up new, more humane, and socially just life narratives

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Kurtis Pankow, Amber D. Mosewich, and Nicholas L. Holt

-based coach education program . International Sport Coaching Journal, 2, 248 – 260 . doi:10.1123/iscj.2014-0122 Ligon , G.S. , Hunter , S.T. , & Mumford , M.D. ( 2008 ). Development of outstanding leadership: A life narrative approach . Leadership Quarterly, 19, 312 – 334 . doi:10.1016/j

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Madison Ardizzi, Brian Wilson, Lyndsay Hayhurst, and Janet Otte

” ( Starkey, 2016 , para. 1). Based on an ethnographic study of participants in an SDP program within postgenocide Rwanda, Marchesseault ( 2016 ) highlighted how the Rwandan cyclists who were recipients of aid were also active agents that created their own life narratives within a postconflict nation

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Kurtis Pankow, Amber D. Mosewich, and Nicholas L. Holt

.21.2.191 Ligon , G.S. , Hunter , S.T. , & Mumford , M.D. ( 2008 ). Development of outstanding leadership: A life narrative approach . The Leadership Quarterly, 19 , 312 – 334 . doi:10.1016/j.leaqua.2008.03.005 10.1016/j.leaqua.2008.03.005 Mayan , M.J. ( 2009 ). Essentials of

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James Stephenson, Colum Cronin, and Amy E. Whitehead

conquer the last session, so I can get back to normal life. (Narrative) Eccles and Arsal ( 2017 ) discuss the common pitfalls of using TA and support that TA is not particularly natural, especially in the presence of others. Although warm-up exercises from Eccles ( 2012 ) and Ericsson and Simon ( 1993