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Patricia L. Krebs and Martin E. Block

The mission of education is to prepare all students with and without disabilities for adult life in the community. Recent amendments to Public Law 94-142 now require transition services, which promote movement from school to postschool activities, for all students with disabilities to begin as early as age 14 and to be included in the student’s IEP. Most special education programs provide vocational, domestic, and community independent living skills training. However, the same cannot be said for lifelong sport and fitness training. A life-skills model for teaching sport and fitness skills that are chronologically age appropriate, functional, and community based is preferred to the traditional developmental approach for teaching adapted physical education. The life-skills model for teaching adapted physical education changes the setting–from school sport facilities to community sport and recreation facilities–in which adapted physical education classes are conducted. It also expands the role of the adapted physical educator from direct service provider to include transition team member, consultant to regular physical education and community sport and recreation agencies, trainer of support personnel, and environmental analyst.

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Jill L. McNitt-Gray

a common goal. Successful pursuits often require trust, teamwork, listening, problem solving, perseverance, and patience throughout the process. These life skills are also the same skills needed to conduct innovative research in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields, and

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Martin E. Block

What is appropriate physical education for students with profound disabilities? Some suggest a developmental model in which students learn prerequisite skills before they are exposed to higher level skills. Others suggest the use of specially designed games that often bear little resemblance to traditional physical education activities. Still others call for a therapeutic model in which physical education focuses on physical and occupational therapy techniques. While these models provide viable programming options for students with profound disabilities, alone they do not constitute an appropriate physical education program as defined in PL 94-142 (reauthorized as PL 101-476). In addition, current philosophies in special education for students with severe and profound disabilities call for programs that are chronological age appropriate, functional, data based, and taught in natural, community based settings. This paper provides an alternative view of what is appropriate physical education for students with profound disabilities by integrating the best aspects of the models described above with the current life-skills curricula model employed in special education.

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Ross Flowers

Acting as a liaison between a university’s counseling and psychological services and intercollegiate athletics department is an emerging alternative career path in professional psychology. This article details how a psychologist-sport psychologist liaison role can provide both psychological counseling and sport psychology consulting in a university setting. In addition, the author outlines the mission and goals of such a position, the departments within which this work is carried out, how psychology and applied sport psychology services are conceptualized and integrated, and the responsibilities and service duties of a counseling psychologist and sport psychologist to university student-athletes, coaches, and staff. It is hoped that illustrating this relationship between university counseling and psychological services and athletic departments will demonstrate how campus resources can be employed to assist student-athletes with performance enhancement, personal enrichment, and life skills development. In addition, the author offers examples of ways that athletic coaching, administration, and program development can be enhanced through cultivation of positive relationships between university counseling and psychological services, and intercollegiate athletic departments.

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Kristoffer Henriksen, Louise Kamuk Storm, Natalia Stambulova, Nicklas Pyrdol and Carsten Hvid Larsen

Targeted mental skills Goal setting, self-talk, visualization, stress management, pre-performance routines, and relaxation. Beyond mental skills A whole person approach with focus on family, school, peers, self-management and life skills. Education of coaches and parents Focus is limited to sport

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Leonardo Ruiz, Judy L. Van Raalte, Thaddeus France and Al Petitpas

; Zirin, 2005 ). It has been suggested that the academy system leaves players unprepared in terms of the life skills and resources needed to transition to productive, socially healthy lives after sport ( Danish, Petitpas, & Hale, 1993 ; Schlossberg, 1981 ; Taylor & Olgivie, 1994 ). Theoretical and

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Michelle L. Bartlett, Mitch Abrams, Megan Byrd, Arial S. Treankler and Richard Houston-Norton

to understand anger differences between athletes and non-athletes, it is also vital to be able to apply that information towards benefitting individual health and well-being. The aforementioned results show differences in anger levels based on gender. Programming regarding life skill development at

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Florence Lebrun, Áine MacNamara, Dave Collins and Sheelagh Rodgers

contexts (e.g., opportunities, needs, or benefits of life skills transfer; Kendellen & Camiré, 2019 ). In addition, this type of intervention may also provide athletes with sufficient awareness and tools to monitor, early detect, and fight against developing MHIs. However, in order to be as efficient as

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J.D. DeFreese, Travis E. Dorsch and Travis A. Flitton

sport: A systematic review . The Sport Psychologist, 21 , 127 – 151 . doi:10.1123/tsp.21.2.127 10.1123/tsp.21.2.127 Gould , D.R. , & Carson , S. ( 2008 ). Life skills development through sport: Current status and future directions . International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 1

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Shelby Waldron, J.D. DeFreese, Brian Pietrosimone, Johna Register-Mihalik and Nikki Barczak

maladaptive psychosocial outcomes of sport involvement (e.g., competition stress), it is primarily postulated to be associated with positive outcomes, including: a healthy, multidimensional identity, intrinsic motivation, life skills, and social capital ( Côté, Horton, et al., 2009 ; Côté, Lidor, et