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Veera Ehrlén

This case study examines contemporary recreational sports practitioners’ communication practices and social tie formation from the perspective of two lifestyle sports disciplines: climbing and trail running. Online survey results from 301 climbers and trail runners from Finland indicate that computer-mediated communication (CMC) has established its place in recreational lifestyle sports cultures; however, it has not done it at the expense of face-to-face (FtF) communication. Online interaction produces weak social ties with instrumental and informative value, but physical location is essential in establishing ties with emotional and appraisal value. This paper argues that it is the sports subculture and individual practitioners’ needs that define how interaction is realized, and what importance different online and off-line communication practices have. Besides studying communication practices, this case study explores the social meanings practitioners attribute to their social contacts.

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Jesse Couture

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Anna-Liisa Ojala and Holly Thorpe

Action sports (e.g., snowboarding, skateboarding, windsurfing, BMX) have traditionally celebrated antiauthoritarian, do-it-yourself and anticompetition cultural values. With the institutionalization and commercialization of action sports over the past two decades, and the introduction of mega-sports events such as the X Games, and the inclusion of some action sports into the Olympic Games (i.e., snowboarding, freestyle skiing, BMX), action sport athletes are increasingly working with coaches, psychologists, agents, managers and personal trainers to improve their performances. In this Insights paper we consider coaching in action sports via the case of Finnish professional snowboarders’ attitudes to coaches. Drawing upon conversations with elite freestyle snowboarders we briefly present insights into their perceptions of the various positions of coaches in professional snowboarding before we offer suggestions built upon a Problem-based learning approach for coaches interested in working with action sport athletes.

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Karen M. McCormack

Lifestyle sports studies have emphasized the boundary work done by core participants and the resulting exclusionary and hierarchical structures of these sports. Mountain biking is a lifestyle sport structured to incorporate new riders, yet bikers still share a group identity, raising important questions about whether exclusivity is necessary for subcultural identity. Drawing on 60 interviews with mountain bikers, this study explores both the meanings participants make of their experience and the organizational structure of the community. The community is designed to recruit and fully incorporate new members, while members maintain a sense of identity as mountain bikers through transmitting skills and knowledge to newer riders. These findings point to the importance of organizational structure in shaping community practices.

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-0010 The Cultural Politics of Lifestyle Sports Jesse Couture 9 2014 31 3 381 386 10.1123/ssj.2014-0019 ssj Sociology of Sport Journal 0741-1235 1543-2785 2014 31 3 10.1123/ssj.2014.31.issue-3 Articles 10.1123/ssj.2012-0185 Article 10.1123/ssj.2013-0121 10.1123/ssj.2013-0103 10.1123/ssj.2013-0071 10

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Brown-Devlin * 9 2017 10 3 371 392 10.1123/ijsc.2017-0050 Case Study Communication Practices and Social Tie Formation: A Case Study of Recreational Lifestyle Sports Cultures Veera Ehrlén * 9 2017 10 3 393 413 10.1123/ijsc.2017-0032 Book Review Evolution of the Modern Sports Fan: Communicative