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Harry G. Banyard, Kazunori Nosaka, Alex D. Vernon and G. Gregory Haff

demonstrated an inverse linear relationship exists between load and velocity (load–velocity profile [LVP]), meaning that if maximal effort is given for the concentric phase of a lift, heavier loads cannot be lifted with the same velocity as lighter loads. 4 – 8 Furthermore, if maximal concentric effort is

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Alejandro Pérez-Castilla and Amador García-Ramos

, Haff GG . Differences in the load-velocity profile between 4 bench-press variants . Int J Sports Physiol Perform . 2018 ; 13 : 326 – 331 . PubMed ID: 28714752 doi:10.1123/ijspp.2017-0158 10.1123/ijspp.2017-0158 28714752 7. González-Badillo JJ , Sánchez-Medina L . Movement velocity as a

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Amador García-Ramos, Francisco Luis Pestaña-Melero, Alejandro Pérez-Castilla, Francisco Javier Rojas and Guy Gregory Haff

lower-body exercises. 8 – 10 , 15 The bench press (BP) has been the most commonly used upper-body exercise to explore the load–velocity profile. 5 , 9 , 16 In this regard, several investigations have provided general equations to predict BP relative load (%1RM) from the velocity of the barbell

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Harry G. Banyard, James J. Tufano, Jonathon J.S. Weakley, Sam Wu, Ivan Jukic and Kazunori Nosaka

. As mentioned previously, a VBT method exists that involves adjusting training loads to achieve a certain number of repetitions at a target velocity, which is established from an individualized load–velocity profile (LVP) regression equation. 4 , 12 This VBT method is based on research showing that

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Harry G. Banyard, James J. Tufano, Jose Delgado, Steve W. Thompson and Kazunori Nosaka

individualized load–velocity profiles (LVPs) have been shown to be reliable, 13 – 15 yet no research has explored the use of the LVP as a method of adjusting training load. It is proposed that if velocity targets are not met according to individualized LVP during a training session, then training load can be

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.T. Salo * 1 07 2018 13 6 755 762 10.1123/ijspp.2017-0378 ijspp.2017-0378 The Reliability of Individualized Load–Velocity Profiles Harry G. Banyard * Kazunori Nosaka * Alex D. Vernon * G. Gregory Haff * 1 07 2018 13 6 763 769 10.1123/ijspp.2017-0610 ijspp.2017-0610 Relationship Between 2

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-0090 ijspp.2017-0090 Comparison of Methods of Calculating Dynamic Strength Index Paul Comfort * Christopher Thomas * Thomas Dos’Santos * Paul A. Jones * Timothy J. Suchomel * John J. McMahon * 1 03 2018 13 3 320 325 10.1123/ijspp.2017-0255 ijspp.2017-0255 Differences in the Load–Velocity Profile

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-0531 ijspp.2019-0531 Effects of Time of Day on Pacing in a 4-km Time Trial in Trained Cyclists Emma K. Zadow * James W. Fell * Cecilia M. Kitic * Jia Han * Sam S. X. Wu * 05 10 2020 1 11 2020 15 10 1455 1459 10.1123/ijspp.2019-0952 ijspp.2019-0952 Changes in the Load–Velocity Profile Following

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Francisco Luis Pestaña-Melero, G. Gregory Haff, Francisco Javier Rojas, Alejandro Pérez-Castilla and Amador García-Ramos

for using individual load–velocity profiles. Test–retest reliability concerns the repeatability of the observed value when the measurement is repeated and it is generally assessed by the standard error of measurement (commonly expressed as coefficient of variation; CV) and the intraclass correlation

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Alejandro Pérez-Castilla, Daniel Jerez-Mayorga, Dario Martínez-García, Ángela Rodríguez-Perea, Luis J. Chirosa-Ríos and Amador García-Ramos

. 2010 ; 31 : 347 – 352 . doi:10.1055/s-0030-1248333 20180176 10.1055/s-0030-1248333 4. García-Ramos A , Pestaña-Melero FL , Pérez-Castilla A , Rojas FJ , Haff GG . Differences in the load-velocity profile between 4 bench press variants . Int J Sports Physiol Perform . 2018 ; 13 : 326