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Caroline Lisee, Tom Birchmeier, Arthur Yan, Brent Geers, Kaitlin O’Hagan, Callum Davis and Christopher Kuenze

ACL injury associated with common sport-related tasks. Kinetic variables, such as peak vertical ground reaction force (vGRF), and linear loading rates provide key insights into the characteristics of forces acting on the body as well as an individual’s response to these forces during functional tasks

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Jessica G. Hunter, Alexander M.B. Smith, Lena M. Sciarratta, Stephen Suydam, Jae Kun Shim and Ross H. Miller

of runner groups and/or running conditions. 1 , 4 , 5 , 8 – 15 High vertical average loading rate (VALR) has been prospectively 4 and retrospectively 1 associated with running injuries in rearfoot strike runners. More cushioned shoes are often recommended for impact shock attenuation associated

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Erik A. Wikstrom, Kyeongtak Song, Kimmery Migel and Chris J. Hass

Key Points ▸ Aberrant loading is a mechanism which negatively impacts cartilage health. ▸ Individuals with CAI demonstrate higher normalized loading rate and less time to peak vGRF compared to controls. ▸ Altered loading rates in CAI may lead to an increased risk of early cartilage degeneration

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C. Mark Woodard, Margaret K. James and Stephen P. Messier

Our purpose was to compare methods of calculating loading rate to the first peak vertical ground reaction force during walking and provide a rationale for the selection of a loading rate algorithm in the analysis of gait in clinical and research environments. Using vertical ground reaction force data collected from 15 older adults with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis and 15 healthy controls, we: (a) calculated loading rate as the first peak vertical force divided by the time from touchdown until the first peak; (b) calculated loading rate as the slope of the least squares regression line using vertical force and time as the dependent and independent variables, respectively; (c) calculated loading rate over discrete intervals using the Central Difference method; and (d) calculated loading rate using vertical force and lime data representing 20% and 90% of the first peak vertical force. The largest loading rate, which may be of greatest clinical importance, occurred when loading rates were calculated using the fewest number of data points. The Central Difference method appeared to maximize our ability to detect differences between healthy and pathologic cohorts. Finally, there was a strong correlation between methods, suggesting that all four methods are acceptable. However, if maximizing the chances of detecting differences between groups is of primary importance, the Central Difference method appears superior.

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AmirAli Jafarnezhadgero, Morteza Madadi-Shad, Christopher McCrum and Kiros Karamanidis

knee abduction and external rotation during landing in genu valgus individuals should be regarded as targets for interventions in these patients ( Barrios et al., 2016 ; Chappell et al., 2007 ). The treatment of knee misalignment might also help to reduce the GRF, vertical loading rate, impulses, and

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Jeremy J. Bauer, Robyn K. Fuchs, Gerald A. Smith and Christine M. Snow

Drop landings increase hip bone mass in children. However, force characteristics from these landings have not been studied. We evaluated ground and hip joint reaction forces, average loading rates, and changes across multiple trials from drop landings associated with osteogenesis in children. Thirteen prepubescent children who had previously participated in a bone loading program volunteered for testing. They performed 100 drop landings onto a force plate. Ground reaction forces (GRF) and two-dimensional kinematic data were recorded. Hip joint reaction forces were calculated using inverse dynamics. Maximum GRF were 8.5 ± 2.2 body weight (BW). At initial contact, GRF were 5.6 ± 1.4 BW while hip joint reactions were 4.7 ± 1.4 BW. Average loading rates for GRF were 472 ± 168 BW/s. Ground reaction forces did not change significantly across trials for the group. However, 5 individuals showed changes in max GRF across trials. Our data indicate that GRF are attenuated 19% to the hip at the first impact peak and 49% at the second impact peak. Given the skeletal response from the drop landing protocol and our analysis of the associated force magnitudes and average loading rates, we now have a data point on the response surface for future study of various combinations of force, rate, and number of load repetitions for increasing bone in children.

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Alex V. Rowlands, John M. Schuna Jr., Victoria H. Stiles and Catrine Tudor-Locke

Background:

Previous research has reported peak vertical acceleration and peak loading rate thresholds beneficial to bone mineral density (BMD). Such thresholds are difficult to translate into meaningful recommendations for physical activity. Cadence (steps/min) is a more readily interpretable measure of ambulatory activity.

Objective:

To examine relationships between cadence, peak vertical acceleration and peak loading rate during ambulation and identify the cadence associated with previously reported bone-beneficial thresholds for peak vertical acceleration (4.9 g) and peak loading rate (43 BW/s).

Methods:

Ten participants completed 8 trials each of: slow walking, brisk walking, slow running, and fast running. Acceleration data were captured using a GT3×+ accelerometer worn at the hip. Peak loading rate was collected via a force plate.

Results:

Strong relationships were identified between cadence and peak vertical acceleration (r = .96, P < .05) and peak loading rate (r = .98, P < .05). Regression analyses indicated cadences of 157 ± 12 steps/min (2.6 ± 0.2 steps/s) and 122 ± 10 steps/min (2.0 ± 0.2 steps/s) corresponded with the 4.9 g peak vertical acceleration and 43 BW/s peak loading rate thresholds, respectively.

Conclusions:

Cadences ≥ 2.0 to 2.6 steps/s equate to acceleration and loading rate thresholds related to bone health. Further research is needed to investigate whether the frequency of daily occurrences of this cadence is associated with BMD.

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Arnel Aguinaldo and Andrew Mahar

This study evaluated the effects of running shoes—with two types of cushioning column systems—on impact force patterns during running. Kinematic and ground reaction force data were collected from 10 normal participants wearing shoes with the following cushions: 4-column multicellular urethane elastomer (Shoe 1), 4-column thermoplastic polyester elastomer (Shoe 2), and 1-unit EVA foam (Shoe 3). Participants exhibited significantly lower impact force (p = .02) and loading rate (p = .005) with Shoe 2 (1.84 ± 0.24 BW; 45.6 ± 11.6 BW/s) compared to Shoe 1 (1.94 ± 0.18 BW; 57.9 ± 12.1 BW/s). Both cushioning column shoes showed impact force characteristics similar to those of a top-model running shoe (Shoe 3), and improved cushioning performance over shoes previously tested in similar conditions. Alterations in impact force patterns induced by lower limb alignment and running speed were negligible since participants did not differ in ankle position, knee position, or speed during all shod running trials. Ankle plantarflexion, however, was higher for barefoot running, indicating an apparent midfoot strike. Mechanical testing of each shoe during physiologic, cyclic loading demonstrated that Shoe 3 had the greatest stiffness, followed by Shoe 2 and Shoe 1. Shoe 1 was the least stiff of the two shoes with cushioning column systems, yet it displayed a significantly higher impact loading rate during running, possibly due to rearfoot motion alterations induced by the stiffer shoe. This study showed that even in similar shoe types, impact force and loading rate values could vary significantly with midsole cushion constructions. The findings of this study suggest that using these newer running shoes may be effective for runners who want optimal cushioning during running.

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Danilo de Oliveira Silva, Ronaldo Briani, Marcella Pazzinatto, Deisi Ferrari, Fernando Aragão and Fábio de Azevedo

Individuals with patellofemoral pain (PFP) use different motor strategies during unipodal support in stair climbing activities, which may be assessed by vertical ground reaction force parameters. Thus, the aims of this study were to investigate possible differences in first peak, valley, second peak, and loading rate between recreational female athletes with PFP and pain-free athletes during stair climbing in order to determine the association and prediction capability between these parameters, pain level, and functional status in females with PFP. Thirty-one recreational female athletes with PFP and 31 pain-free recreational female athletes were evaluated with three-dimensional kinetics while performing stair climbing to obtain vertical ground reaction force parameters. A visual analog scale was used to evaluate the usual knee pain. The anterior knee pain scale was used to evaluate knee functional score. First peak and loading rate were associated with pain (r = .46, P = .008; r = .56, P = .001, respectively) and functional limitation (r = .31, P = .049; r = −.36, P = .032, respectively). Forced entry regression revealed the first peak was a significant predictor of pain (36.5%) and functional limitation (28.7%). Our findings suggest that rehabilitation strategies aimed at correcting altered vertical ground reaction force may improve usual knee pain level and self-reported knee function in females with PFP.

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Ali Jalalvand and Mehrdad Anbarian

fatigue was evaluated with kinetic parameters of landing GRFs, loading rates (rate of force development [RFD]), impulses, and time to peak. The increased magnitude of RFD has been associated with a risk of stress fractures, plantar fasciitis, and patellofemoral pain. 17 As jumping and landing are among