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Ali Brian, Laura Bostick, Angela Starrett, Aija Klavina, Sally Taunton Miedema, Adam Pennell, Alex Stribing, Emily Gilbert and Lauren J. Lieberman

Fundamental motor skills (FMS) are the building blocks to more complex movement patterns, sport participation, and physical activity (PA; Clark & Metcalfe, 2002 ). FMS, which include locomotor skills (e.g., run, gallop, jump, leap, skip, slide, hop), must be taught in a developmentally appropriate

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Sofiya Alhassan, Ogechi Nwaokelemeh, Manneh Ghazarian, Jasmin Roberts, Albert Mendoza and Sanyog Shitole

This pilot study examined the effects of a teacher-taught, locomotor skill (LMS)- based physical activity (PA) program on the LMS and PA levels of minority preschooler-aged children. Eight low-socioeconomic status preschool classrooms were randomized into LMS-PA (LMS-oriented lesson plans) or control group (supervised free playtime). Interventions were delivered for 30 min/day, five days/week for six months. Changes in PA (accelerometer) and LMS variables were assessed with MANCOVA. LMS-PA group exhibited a significant reduction in during-preschool (F (1,16) = 6.34, p = .02, d = 0.02) and total daily (F (1,16) = 9.78, p = .01, d = 0.30) percent time spent in sedentary activity. LMS-PA group also exhibited significant improvement in leaping skills, F (1, 51) = 7.18, p = .01, d = 0.80). No other, significant changes were observed. The implementation of a teacher-taught, LMS-based PA program could potentially improve LMS and reduce sedentary time of minority preschoolers.

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Judith Jiménez, Maria Morera, Walter Salazar and Carl Gabbard

Purpose:

Motor skill competence has been associated with physical activity level, fitness, and other relevant health-related characteristics. Recent research has focused on understanding these relationships in children and adolescents, but little is known about subsequent years. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between fundamental motor skill (FMS) ability and body mass index (BMI) in young adults.

Method:

Participants, 40 men and 40 women (M age = 19.25 yr, SD = 2.48), were assessed for BMI and motor competence with 10 fundamental motor skills (FMSs) using the Test for Fundamental Motor Skills in Adults (TFMSA).

Results:

BMI was negatively associated with total motor ability (r = –.257; p = .02) and object control skills (r = –.251; p = .02); the relationship with locomotor skills was marginally insignificant (r = –.204; p = .07). In regard to individual skills, a significant negative association was found for running, jumping, striking, and kicking (ps < .05). Multiple regression analysis indicated that BMI and gender predicted 42% of the variance in total FMS score; gender was the only significant predictor.

Conclusion:

Overall, these preliminary findings suggest that young adults with higher FMS ability are more likely to have lower BMI scores.

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Lisa M. Barnett, David R. Lubans, Anna Timperio, Jo Salmon and Nicola D. Ridgers

, physical activity and actual motor skill with Australian children’s perceived object control and locomotor skills. Methods Participants Primary schools located within a 30 km radius of the Deakin University campus in the eastern suburbs of Melbourne, Australia were identified and randomly invited to

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Vaimanino Rogers, Lisa M. Barnett and Natalie Lander

). FMS are basic skills that have been typically divided into three categories, object control skills (such as catching and throwing), locomotor skills (such as running and hopping), and stability skills (such as balancing and twisting) ( Gallahue, Ozmun, & Goodway, 2012 ). It is expected that by age 10

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Ali Brian, Farid Bardid, Lisa M. Barnett, Frederik J.A. Deconinck, Matthieu Lenoir and Jacqueline D. Goodway

 al., 2015 ; Stodden et al., 2008 ). FMS are considered the building blocks to more advanced movement patterns ( Seefeldt, 1980 ) and generally consist of locomotor skills and object control skills. Locomotor skills involve moving the body from one point in space to another (e.g., running, leaping, jumping

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Ruri Famelia, Emi Tsuda, Syahrial Bakhtiar and Jacqueline D. Goodway

as kicking and throwing; and locomotor skills (move the body from one place to another) such as running and galloping ( Gallahue et al., 2012 ). FMS do not naturally emerge as a result of maturation and need to be taught in structured motor skill programs during the early childhood years ( Goodway

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E. Kipling Webster, Leah E. Robinson and Danielle D. Wadsworth

completed the Test of Gross Motor Development—second edition (TGMD-2). 44 The TGMD-2 assesses 12 FMS separated into 2 subscales: object control (2-handed striking, throwing, catching, kicking, dribbling, and underhand rolling) and locomotor skills (running, galloping, sliding, leaping, hopping, and

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Nadia Cristina Valentini, Glauber Carvalho Nobre, Mariele Santayana de Souza and Michael J. Duncan

Gross Motor Development-2 has 2 subtests: locomotor skills (LOCS; run, gallop, hop, leap, jump, and slide) and object control skills (OCS; strike, dribble, catch, kick, throw, and underhand roll). Overall raw scores and standard scores were provided; raw scores were used in the present study. Two

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Xiangli Gu, Senlin Chen and Xiaoxia Zhang

Control and Prevention growth charts for all participants ( CDC, 2014 ). Fundamental Motor Skills Two categories of FMS were assessed using the PE Metrics ™ ( National Association for Sport and Physical Education [NASPE], 2010 ): 1) locomotor skills including hopping and sliding; and 2) object