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John M. Mayer, James E. Graves, Todd M. Manini, James L. Nuzzo and Lori L. Ploutz-Snyder

The purpose of this preliminary study was to assess lumbar multifidus, erector spinae, and quadratus lum-borum muscle activity during lifts as measured by changes in transverse relaxation time (T2) from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirteen healthy adults performed dynamic squat, stoop, and asymmetric stoop lifts at a standard load, with each lift followed by MRI. Increase in T2 for the multifidus and erector spinae was greater for the stoop than squat. No difference in T2 increase was noted between the multifidus and erector spinae for the squat or stoop. Increase in T2 for the contralateral multifidus was less for the asymmetric stoop than stoop. Future research using MRI and other biomechanical techniques is needed to fully characterize lumbar muscle activity during lifts for various populations, settings, postures, and loads.

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Lílian Ramiro Felicio, Marcelo Camargo Saad, Rogério Ferreira Liporaci, Augusto do Prado Baffa, Antônio Carlos dos Santos and Débora Bevilaqua-Grossi

Purpose:

To evaluate patellar kinematics of volunteers without knee pain at rest and during isometric contraction in open- and closed-kinetic-chain exercises.

Methods:

Twenty individuals took part in this study. All were submitted to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during rest and voluntary isometric contraction (VIC) in the open and closed kinetic chain at 15°, 30°, and 45° of knee flexion. Through MRI and using medical e-film software, the following measurements were evaluated: sulcus angle, patellar-tilt angle, and bisect offset. The mixed-effects linear model was used for comparison between knee positions, between rest and isometric contractions, and between the exercises.

Results:

Data analysis revealed that the sulcus angle decreased as knee flexion increased and revealed increases with isometric contractions in both the open and closed kinetic chain for all knee-flexion angles. The patellar-tilt angle decreased with isometric contractions in both the open and closed kinetic chain for every knee position. However, in the closed kinetic chain, patellar tilt increased significantly with the knee flexed at 15°. The bisect offset increased with the knee flexed at 15° during isometric contractions and decreased as knee flexion increased during both exercises.

Conclusion:

VIC in the last degrees of knee extension may compromise patellar dynamics. On the other hand, it is possible to favor patellar stability by performing muscle contractions with the knee flexed at 30° and 45° in either the open or closed kinetic chain.

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Grant E. Norte, Katherine R. Knaus, Chris Kuenze, Geoffrey G. Handsfield, Craig H. Meyer, Silvia S. Blemker and Joseph M. Hart

also prohibit the use of force-based measurement techniques, such as isometric knee extension torque and muscle activation, or confound the accuracy of strength estimates during early phases of recovery. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based volumetric assessment of skeletal muscle, on the other hand

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Megan P. Brady and Windee Weiss

clinical diagnostic tests and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is debatable. 1 , 3 – 6 Because of the frequency of knee injury, 3 MRI is a common diagnostic tool used for imaging and diagnosis. 5 ACL tears are also diagnosed using clinical diagnostic tests. 1 , 3 – 6 Patient outcomes are dependent on a

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Mark A. Feger, Luke Donovan, C. Collin Herb, Geoffrey G. Handsfield, Silvia S. Blemker, Joseph M. Hart, Susan A. Saliba, Mark F. Abel, Joseph S. Park and Jay Hertel

Leisure-Time Physical Activity Scale 51.8 (23.0) Abbreviations: ADL, activities of daily living; CAI, chronic ankle instability; FAAM, Foot and Ankle Ability Measure; IdFAI, Identification of Functional Ankle Instability. Instruments Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Foot and Ankle Muscle Volumes Subjects

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Nobuaki Tottori, Tadashi Suga, Yuto Miyake, Ryo Tsuchikane, Mitsuo Otsuka, Akinori Nagano, Satoshi Fujita and Tadao Isaka

, participants were still and quiet in undergarments without contact between the torso and arms or between the thighs. The FFM was automatically calculated based on whole body composition from BIA measurement. The value of the FFM in the participants was 31.7 ± 5.7 kg. Magnetic Resonance Imaging The

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Norihide Sugisaki, Kai Kobayashi, Hiroyasu Tsuchie and Hiroaki Kanehisa

difference between the 2 measurements ( P  > .05). In addition, intraclass correlation coefficients for muscle CSA and volume were both .999 ( P  < .001). Figure 1 —Examples of magnetic resonance images. 1, psoas major; 2, iliac; 3, gluteus medius + minimus; 4, gluteus maximus; 5, sartorius; 6, tensor

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Ryota Akagi, Soichiro Iwanuma, Satoru Hashizume, Hiroaki Kanehisa, Toshimasa Yanai and Yasuo Kawakami

The purpose of this study was to investigate how the contraction-induced increase in distal biceps brachii tendon moment arm is related to that in elbow flexor muscle thickness, with a specific emphasis on the influence of the site-related differences in muscle thickness. The moment arm and muscle thickness were determined from sagittal and cross-sectional images, respectively, of the right arm obtained by magnetic resonance imaging of nine young men. The muscle thickness was measured at levels from the reference site (60% of the upper arm length from the acromial process of the scapula to the lateral epicondyle of the humerus) to 60 mm distal to it (every 10 mm; 7 measurement sites). At 80° of elbow flexion, the moment arm and muscle thickness were determined at rest and during 60% of maximal voluntary contraction (60%MVC) of isometric elbow flexion. Only the relative change from rest to 60%MVC in muscle thickness at the level 60 mm distal to the reference site correlated significantly with that of the moment arm. This result indicates that the contraction-induced increase in distal biceps brachii tendon moment arm is related to that in elbow flexor muscle thickness near the corresponding muscle-tendon junction.

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Madoka Ogawa, Naotoshi Mitsukawa, Michael G. Bemben and Takashi Abe

Context:

Previous studies investigated the relationship between ultrasound-derived anatomical muscle thickness (MTH) and individual muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) and muscle volume in several limb and trunk muscles; however, the adductor muscle that contributes to hip adduction and pelvic stabilization, as well as balance ability, has not been studied.

Objective:

To examine the relationship between MTH of the lower, middle, and upper thigh measured by B-mode ultrasound and the muscle CSA and volume of adductor muscle obtained by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to confirm the possibility of predicting adductor muscle CSA/volume using ultrasound-derived MTH.

Setting:

University research laboratory.

Subjects:

10 men and 10 women (20–41 y old) volunteered to participate in this study.

Main Outcome Measures:

A series of continuous muscle CSAs along the thigh were measured by MRI scans (1.5-T scanner, GE Signa). In each slice, the anatomical CSA of the adductors was analyzed, and the muscle volume was calculated by multiplying muscle CSA by slice thickness. Thigh MTH was measured by B-mode ultrasound (Aloka SSD-500) at 5 sites (anterior 30%, 50%, and 70% and posterior 50% and 70% of thigh length).

Results:

A strong correlation was observed between anterior 30% MTH and 30% adductor CSA in men (r = .845, P < .002) and women (r = .952, P < .001) and in both groups combined (r = .922, P < .001). Anterior 30% MTH was also strongly correlated to adductor muscle volume when combined with thigh length (n = 20, r = .949, P < .001). However, there were moderate or nonsignificant correlations between anterior and posterior 50% and 70% MTH and adductor muscle CSA/volume.

Conclusions:

The results suggest that MTH in the upper portion of anterior thigh best reflects adductor muscle CSA or muscle volume, while the lower portions of the anterior and posterior sites are least likely to predict adductor muscle size.

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Sara B. Giordano, Richard L. Segal and Thomas A. Abelew

The purpose of this study was to investigate the end-point force trajectories of the fibularis longus (FIB), lateral gastrocnemius (LG), and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles. Most information about individual muscle function has come from studies that use models based on electromyographic (EMG) recordings. In this study (N = 20 subjects) we used electrical stimulation (20 Hz) to elicit activity in individual muscles, recorded the end-point forces at the foot, and verified the selectivity of stimulation by using magnetic resonance imaging. Unexpectedly, no significant differences were found between LG and MG force directions. Stimulation of LG and MG resulted in downward and medial or lateral forces depending on the subject. We found FIB end-point forces to be significantly different from those of LG and MG. In all subjects, stimulation of FIB resulted in downward and lateral forces. Based on our results, we suggest that there are multiple factors determining when and whether LG or MG will produce a medial or lateral force and FIB consistently plays a significant role in eversion/abduction and plantar flexion. We suggest that the intersubject variability we found is not simply an artifact of experimental or technical error but is functionally relevant and should be addressed in future studies and models.