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Scott W. Cheatham and Morey J. Kolber

Roller massage (RM) with a foam roller has become a popular intervention for allied health professionals and clients. The knowledge regarding the effects of foam rolling has expanded over the past decade. 1 Research suggests that foam rolling may offer short-term benefits (<10 minutes) for

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Erik A. Wikstrom and Patrick O. McKeon

life scores. 14 Ankle joint mobilizations clearly improve DFROM in those with CAI. 15 , 16 Stretching and plantar massage have also improved DFROM in different populations. 17 , 18 Most recently, a randomized controlled trial (RCT) reported that ankle joint mobilizations, calf stretching, and plantar

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Emily R. Hunt, Shelby E. Baez, Anne D. Olson, Timothy A. Butterfield and Esther Dupont-Versteegden

Key Points ▸ Fear-avoidance and the pain tension cycle contribute to chronic pain. ▸ Massage may modulate physiological and psychological factors associated with pain postinjury. ▸ Breaking the pain tension cycle facilitates progression in rehabilitation and earlier recovery. Pain is often

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Scott W. Cheatham

. 4 , 7 The interprofessional care of an athlete often involves different interventions used among professionals. One common intervention prescribed is roller massage (RM) or self-myofascial release. The research supports the use of RM as a preexercise warm-up. 8 – 12 Researchers have also

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Vincenzo Ricci and Levent Özçakar

the diagnosis and management of a relatively rare injury of the paraspinal muscles after back massage. Case Presentation Clinical Presentation A 30-year-old male, nonprofessional volleyball player, with no significant past medical history, applied to our clinic with persistent pain in the

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Scott W. Cheatham, Kyle R. Stull and Morey J. Kolber

Roller massage (RM) has become a common myofascial intervention for rehabilitation professionals. Many types of rollers are available to consumers with different surface textures, shapes, and densities. The RM research suggests that rolling may produce short term improvements in joint mobility

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Paula Chaves, Daniela Simões, Maria Paço, Sandra Silva, Francisco Pinho, José Alberto Duarte and Fernando Ribeiro

use, to treat tendon pain such as physical agents, deep friction massage (DFM), counterforce bracing, education and abnormal movement pattern correction, and exercise namely eccentric training. 9 – 11 Regarding DFM, despite the lack of definitive clinical evidence to support its use in the management

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Dominic Micklewright, Murray Griffin, Valerie Gladwell and Ralph Beneke

A within subjects experimental design (N = 16) was used where participants performed a 30-s Wingate anaerobic cycling test (WAnT) after 30-min rest and after 30-min back massage. Mood State was measured before and after each intervention and after the WAnTs. No significant change in mood was detected following rest or massage. However, WAnT performance was better following massage compared to rest. Mood disturbance increased following the WAnT in both the rest and massage conditions. The results suggest that preperformance massage had no effect on mood state yet seemed to facilitate enhanced WAnT performance. The relationship between massage and anaerobic performance remains unclear, however is almost certainly mediated by preperformance psychological factors other than mood state.

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Robert Weinberg, Allen Jackson and Kathleen Kolodny

The purpose of the present investigation was to assess the relationship between exercise, massage, and positive mood enhancement. Subjects were students in physical education classes including swimming, jogging, tennis, and racquetball, with each separate activity comprising a level of the primary independent treatment variable. In addition, subjects from other classes made up a control rest condition and a massage treatment condition resulting in a one-way design. All subjects completed the profile of mood states, state anxiety, and an activation checklist just prior to and immediately after 30 minutes of activity. Instructors in the classes agreed not to schedule any competitions between students but rather just let them play or exercise. Subjects in the control rest condition read or rested for 30 minutes, while in the massage treatment condition a certified massage therapist gave a 30-min Swedish massage. Results indicated that the running and massage conditions consistently produced positive mood enhancement with significant decreases in tension, confusion, fatigue, anxiety, depression, and anger while maintaining high levels of vigor, which is representative of positive mental health. None of the other experimental activity conditions significantly influenced the dependent variables. Practical applications of the use of massage both before and after competition and exercise are discussed, and future directions for research are offered.

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Nicola Giovanelli, Filippo Vaccari, Mirco Floreani, Enrico Rejc, Jasmine Copetti, Marco Garra, Lea Biasutti and Stefano Lazzer

Many athletes commonly use different strategies (ie, dynamic or static stretching, massages, self-myofascial release [SMFR]) before and/or after competitions or training sessions to improve flexibility, accelerate recovery time, and decrease injury risk. 1 However, in the literature there are