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Felipe Lobelo, Marsha Dowda, Karin A. Pfeiffer, and Russell R. Pate

Background:

Few investigations have assessed in adolescent girls the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between elevated exposure to electronic media (EM) and activity-related outcomes such as compliance with physical activity (PA) standards or cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF).

Methods:

Four-hundred thirty-seven white and African American girls were assessed at the 8th, 9th, and 12th grades. PA and EM (TV/video watching, electronic games, Internet use) were self-reported, and CRF was estimated using a cycle-ergometer test. Hi EM exposure was defined as ≥four 30-minute blocks/d.

Results:

8th-, 9th-, and 12th-grade girls in the Hi EM group showed lower compliance with PA standards and had lower CRF than the Low EM group (P ≤ .03). Girls reporting Hi EM exposure at 8th and 9th grades had lower vigorous PA and CRF levels at 12th grade than girls reporting less EM exposure (P ≤ .03).

Conclusion:

Girls reporting exposure to EM for 2 or more hours per day are more likely to exhibit and maintain low PA and CRF levels throughout adolescence. These results enhance the scientific basis for current public health recommendations to limit adolescent girls’ daily exposure to television, electronic games, and Internet use to a combined maximum of 2 hours.

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Henk Erik Meier, Jörg Hagenah, and Malte Jetzke

As Hutchins and Rowe have emphasized, digital plenitude will fundamentally affect sports broadcasting. In particular, niche sports will be confronted with a more difficult media environment in which the chances of being telecast may increase, while the chances of finding an audience are likely to decrease. Therefore, niche sports face the need to further submit to a media logic. The current research is a case study involving an analysis of the 2018 European Championships from a mediatization perspective. While the findings show how aggregation helped to revitalize audience interest, the case study reveals that the future of niche-sport broadcasting is uncertain, because the audience habits that the European Championships exploited are fading.

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Julie Minikel-Lacocque

inferior position to that of men and boys and continue to face systematic discrimination. This is the case with regard to pay, access to quality facilities, media exposure, and harmful stereotypes. It is also true with regard to the phenomenon of gender-policing and sex control ( Krane, 2019 ) whereby

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Christine M. Hoehner, Ross C. Brownson, Diana Allen, James Gramann, Timothy K. Behrens, Myron F. Floyd, Jessica Leahy, Joseph B. Liddle, David Smaldone, Diara D. Spain, Daniel R. Tardona, Nicholas P. Ruthmann, Rachel L. Seiler, and Byron W. Yount

Background:

We synthesized the results of 7 National Park Service pilot interventions designed to increase awareness of the health benefits from participation in recreation at national parks and to increase physical activity by park visitors.

Methods:

A content analysis was conducted of the final evaluation reports of the 7 participating parks. Pooled data were also analyzed from a standardized trail-intercept survey administered in 3 parks.

Results:

The theme of new and diverse partnerships was the most common benefit reported across the 7 sites. The 2 parks that focused on youth showed evidence of an increase in awareness of the benefits of physical activity. Many of the other sites found high levels of awareness at baseline (approaching 90%), suggesting little room for improvement. Five of the 7 projects showed evidence of an increase in physical activity that was associated with the intervention activities. Multivariate analyses suggested that the media exposure contributed to a small but significant increase in awareness of the importance of physical activity (6%) and number of active visits (7%).

Conclusions:

Enhancements and replication of these programs represents a promising opportunity for improving partnerships between public health and recreation to increase physical activity.

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Iñigo Mujika

funding, reputation, media and social media exposure, and demonstrated impact at a community and organizational level. There is a lot more at stake than simply delivering a service. Career progression and success are driven by a concerted effort for professional advancement and opportunity. My advice to

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Ari de Wilde

equally. They continue to deny women a minimum professional salary, unlike the men, and equal media exposure because, they say, there is not enough interest or tradition. It is time the cycling and sporting worlds acknowledge this longstanding tradition. Notes 1. See, for example, Glenn Norcliffe, The

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Chrysostomos Giannoulakis

objectives, and tactics. The second section constitutes the core of this book wherein the author describes how sponsorship really works and problematizes whether a simple gain in media exposure is the end point of our understanding about how sponsorship works. In order to deliver a response to this statement

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Annemarie Farrell

business ambitions and strong working-class roots. His vision of corporate partnerships and bundled media rights as a foundation for college sport financial success led to unparalleled media exposure, exemplified today by the cultural obsession and fan frenzy that is the National Collegiate Athletic

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James Bingaman

sustained and continued development and participation at the local level. Increase in Participation Media exposure of nonnormative sports not only facilitates acceptance, but it can help drive development and participation at the local level ( Woods, 2019 ). The USAFL is hoping that increased media exposure

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Mark E. Moore

which the sport property receives cash, in-kind resources, and media exposure for providing the right to be associated with its events. In explaining sport sponsorship, the chapter goes on to underscore reasoning for entering into a sponsorship agreement from a corporate sponsor’s perspective. Reasons