Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 26 items for :

  • "mediating mechanisms" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Shelby J. Martin and Timothy Anderson

-health help-seeking reported by athletes were related to stigma and embarrassment ( Gulliver, Griffiths, & Christensen, 2012 ). Alternatively, negative perfectionism may function as an additional mediating mechanism. For instance, a serial mediation model in which EP is related to EP help-seeking intentions

Restricted access

Kyungyeol (Anthony) Kim, Kevin K. Byon and Paul M. Pedersen

intention ( Kim & Byon, in press ). Despite scholarly interest in exploring the phenomenon of SDB, it remains unclear as to how sport spectators cope with SDB and how coping processes yield different behavioral outcomes. In the current study, we examine a mediating mechanism of coping strategies in response

Restricted access

Matthew Smith and Christina Lee

This study examined the facilitatory effect of goal setting in physical performance. Three potential mechanisms that may mediate this effect are described: increases in time spent practicing, promotion of effective training strategies, and increases in commitment resulting from public goal setting. Students (N=51) performed a novel task under one of three conditions: public goal setting, private goal setting, and no goal setting. Goals selected, time spent practicing, strategies used during practice, and actual performance were assessed. Subjects in the two goal-setting groups showed better performance than those in the control-group; those in the public goal-setting group spent the most time in practice, but this was not reflected in better performance. Test performance was predicted by baseline performance and by the goal set; practice time, training strategy, and public goal setting did not account for further variance in performance. Although this study failed to find a mediating effect for these three mechanisms, the results must be interpreted with caution.

Restricted access

Navin Kaushal, Ryan E. Rhodes, John T. Meldrum and John C. Spence

Background: A recent randomized controlled trial found that an intervention focused on developing an exercise habit increased weekly minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) over 8 wk compared to a control group. The purpose of the current study was to test if changes in habit, as well as other behavioral strategy constructs from the Multi-Process Action Control Test, mediated between group condition and MVPA (self-report and accelerometry). Methods: Inactive new gym members (N = 94) were randomized into control or experimental (habit-building) groups. Results: No construct entirely explained mediation condition (experimental and control) and changes in MVPA measured by accelerometry. Self-report MVPA found affective judgments, behavioral regulation, and preparatory habit to be mediated between group (experimental/control conditions) and changes in behavior (β = 0.36, 95% confidence interval [.05–.78]). Conclusions: Self-reported and objectively measured behavior models demonstrated complete and partial mediation, respectively. New gym members could benefit from successful behavioral enactment by developing constructs to support habit formation.

Restricted access

Roel Vaeyens, Matthieu Lenoir, A. Mark Williams, Liesbeth Mazyn and Renaat M. Philippaerts

We examined differences in visual search behaviors and decision-making skill across different microstates of offensive play in soccer using youth participants (13.0-15.8 years) varying in skill and experience. We used realistic film simulations of offensive play, movement-based response measures, and an eye movement registration technique. Playing experience, skill level, and the unique constraints of the task, expressed by the number of players and relative proportion of offensive and defensive players, determined both the observed search behavior and processing requirements imposed on players in dynamic offensive team simulations. Significant differences in performance were observed between players and nonplayers and across three groups of soccer players who differed in skill level. Implications for talent identification and development are considered.

Restricted access

Gary B. Wilkerson and Arthur J. Nitz

Ankle proprioception is widely regarded as an important factor that affects susceptibility to ankle sprain, but the precise mechanisms by which proprioceptive abilities may enhance ankle stability are not well understood. Pertinent literature is reviewed and theoretical interrelationships among factors that may affect dynamic ankle function are discussed. Topics addressed include mechanoreceptor function, muscle spindle function, postural balance, ankle edema, joint capsule distension, synovial hypertrophy, capsuloligamentous laxity, anterolateral rotary instability, ankle giving way, reflexive muscle splinting, articular deafferentation, neurogenic inflammation, muscular de-efferentation, and enhancement of compensatory neuromuscular mechanisms. Recommendations for future research are presented in the form of questions that cannot be adequately answered at present concerning the role of proprioceptively mediated mechanisms in the maintenance of dynamic ankle stability.

Restricted access

Frank L. Gardner

The development and acceptance of any scientific discipline requires an ever-expanding and maturing empirical base. Yet despite vast scientific progress in allied domains of professional psychology, the field of sport psychology has remained fairly stagnant in its research progress and has overlooked major advances that could aid in the advancement of the discipline. This article discusses important issues related to the lack of efficacy of the traditional and long assumed “gold-standard” interventions for the enhancement of athletic performance, and compares the field’s empirical base to sister disciplines in psychology. Further, the lack of empirical studies examining rate of change, moderators of change, and mediators (mechanisms) of change is discussed, and suggestions are provided for a new research agenda in sport psychology that could expand its professional credibility and enhance its overall scientific development.

Restricted access

J.J.F.P. Luiken, D. Miskovic, Y. Arumugam, J.F.C. Glatz and A. Bonen

While it has long been assumed that long chain fatty acids (LCFA) can freely diffuse across the plasma membrane, recent work has shown that LCFA uptake also involves a protein-mediated mechanism. Three putative LCFA transporters have been identified (FABPpm, FATP, and FAT/CD36), and all are expressed in rodent and human muscles. In a new model system (giant vesicles), we have demonstrated that (a) LCFA transport rates are scaled with the oxidative capacity of heart and muscle, (b) only FABPpm and FAT/CD36, but not FATP1, correlate with vesicular LCFA transport, and (c) LCFA transport can be increased by increasing (1) the FAT/CD36 protein of muscle (chronic adaptation) or (2) via the translocation of FAT/CD36 from an intracellular pool to the plasma membrane during muscle contraction (acute adaptation).

Restricted access

Relationship of Explicit–Implicit Evaluative Discrepancy to Exercise Dropout in Middle-Aged Adults Tanya R. Berry * Wendy M. Rodgers * Alison Divine * Craig Hall * 1 04 2018 40 2 92 100 10.1123/jsep.2017-0267 jsep.2017-0267 Mediating Mechanisms in a Physical Activity Intervention: A Test of Habit

Restricted access

Mediation Mechanism Between Severity of Spectator Dysfunctional Behavior and Revisit Intention: The Moderating Effects of Self-Construal in Sport Consumption Kyungyeol (Anthony) Kim * Kevin K. Byon * Paul M. Pedersen * 1 01 2020 34 1 38 52 10.1123/jsm.2018-0356 jsm.2018-0356 Determinants of Attendance