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Colin D. McLaren and Kevin S. Spink

shared between members of a team, they capture only one component of membersinteraction. In fact, Ribeiro et al. ( 2017 ) suggest examining other forms of interaction because “undoubtedly in team sports (e.g., football), information flows between players beyond passing behaviours, with the pass being

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Nick Takos, Duncan Murray, and Ian O’Boyle

aims to explore all board member interactions and identify behaviors perceived as important, Hoye and Cuskelly highlighted this dyad as influential and recommended further investigation about the nature of these relationships and how they impact board functioning. In the corporate board context, it has

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Colin D. McLaren and Kevin S. Spink

.g.,  Cartwright, 1968 , McGrath, 1984 ). McGrath ( 1984 ) contended that communication was a fundamental process that separated a group from a mere collection of individuals. In addition, member interactions have been highlighted as a unit of analysis in groups (structural) that fall between the individual and

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Brennan Petersen, Mark Eys, Kody Watson, and M. Blair Evans

sport groups? We urge a greater focus on cooperation among youth group members that considers how variability in the degree of cooperation demanded between individuals influences member interactions, perceived or enacted (e.g., observed) cooperation among team members as a mechanism of group functioning

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Lesley Ferkins, James Skinner, and Steve Swanson

social construct might be most aligned with pure SFD contexts, our third article focuses our attention on Australia’s leading national sport governing body, the Australian Football League. This article explores board member interactions within nonprofit sport organizations (the legal status of the

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Rachel Arnold, Nicole Bolter, Lori Dithurbide, Karl Erickson, Blair Evans, Larkin Lamarche, Sean Locke, Eric Martin, and Kathleen Wilson

Edited by Kim Gammage

through passive sensors and even through digital traces that members leave behind (e.g., e-mail patterns). For example, they describe the use of sensors that detect aspects of member interaction and physical states (e.g., distance between members, vocal intensity, heart rate, heart rate variability) to

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Anthony D. Pizzo, Bradley J. Baker, Gareth J. Jones, and Daniel C. Funk

. In the next sections, we focus on these findings. Table  2 offers an overview of second-order themes, first-order concepts, and a description in relation to the sport experience. Table 2 Data Structure Second-order themes First-order concepts Description Social interaction Member–member interactions

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Kelsey Saizew, M. Blair Evans, Veronica Allan, and Luc J. Martin

impacted member interactions and team functioning. Because we anticipated that sport structures might shape member interactions, we also sought to examine how athlete leaders and coaches responded with specific managerial activities focused on enhancing team members’ relationships and influenced managerial

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Rachel A. Van Woezik, Alex J. Benson, and Mark W. Bruner

explored group member interaction processes following an injury event from the perspectives of athletes ( Surya et al., 2015 ), our results extend these findings by garnering coaches’ perspectives on the implications of injury events for a team’s dynamics. Corroborating Surya et al., the coaches spoke to

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Zack Beddoes, Debra Sazama, and Jenna Starck

, and other faculty members. In order to observe the socialization process and team dynamics in action, the principal investigator focused on the nature of team member interactions, including whose voice was privileged and who spoke and contributed. Another focus was on the content of the meetings and