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Lara R. Keytel, Michael I. Lambert, Judith Johnson, Timothy D. Noakes and Estelle V. Lambert

The aim of the study was to determine the effects of 8 weeks of moderate exercise training, on 24-hour free living energy expenditure in previously sedentary post-menopausal women. The experimental group (EX) included 9 women. Ten non-exercising control subjects (CON) were recruited to undergo pre- and post-testing. Estimated total daily energy expenditure (TDEE), total 24-hour heart beats (HB), total energy intake (TEI), resting metabolic rate, maximal oxygen consumption (V̇O2max), body composition, and submaximal heart rate were measured before and after the exercise intervention. Body composition did not change (body fat % in CON 34.0 ± 4.0% vs. 33.9 ± 3.6% and EX 34.1 ± 4.0% vs. 34.0 ± 3.4%). Mean submaximal heart rate during steady-state exercise in EX was lower after training compared to CON (p < .05); however, V̇O2max did not significantly (CON 1.96 ± 0.23 vs. 1.99 ± 0.241 LO2/min and EX 1.86 ± 0.39 vs. 1.94 ± 0.30 LO2/min). Neither estimated TDEE (CON, 11.6 ± 2.0 vs. 11.4 ± 2.78 MJ; and EX 11.4 ± 3.3 vs. 11.5 ± 2.5 MJ, pre vs. post, respectively), RMR (CON 134.2 ± 9.4 vs. 136.9 ± 15.0 KJ/kgFFM/day, and EX 138.4 ± 6.4 vs. 140.7 ± 14.2 KJ/kgFFM/day, pre vs. post, respectively), TEI (CON 7.9 ± 2.2 vs. 8.2 ± 2.5 MJ, and EX 9.4 ±1.6 vs. 8.3 ± 2.8 MJ), nor HB (CON 110,808 ± 12,574 vs. 107,366 ± 12,864 beats, and EX 110,188 ± 9,219 vs. 114,590 ± 12,750 beats) change over 8 weeks in either group. These data suggest that a moderate exercise program may not impact on TDEE, RMR, TEI, or HB in previously sedentary, older women.

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Julia C. Orri, Elizabeth M. Hughes, Deepa G. Mistry and Antone Scala

balance. To address the influence of the cardiac changes that occur through and beyond menopause, as well as the benefits of endurance training on HRV, the purpose of this study was to compare the linear and nonlinear HRV dynamics from rest through maximal exercise in women who trained at moderate or high

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Sheila A. Dugan, Susan A. Everson-Rose, Kelly Karavolos, Barbara Sternfeld, Deidre Wesley and Lynda H. Powell

Background:

This study was done to determine whether physical activity at baseline is independently associated with musculoskeletal pain and fulfilling one’s physical role over 3 subsequent years.

Methods:

Our research involved a 3-year longitudinal study of over 2400 community-dwelling, midlife women from the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN). Measurements included baseline physical activity using the Kaiser Permanente Health Plan Activity Survey and SF-36 role-physical and bodily pain indices at each of 3 annual follow-up visits.

Results:

Each 1-point increase on the physical activity score was associated with a 7% greater likelihood of a high role-physical score (95% CI = 1.02– 1.13) and a 10% greater likelihood of a low bodily pain score (95% CI = 1.04–1.17) after adjusting for age, race, menopausal status, educational level, body mass index, depressive symptoms, smoking, and chronic medical conditions. The association between physical activity level and role-physical score was eliminated in the fully adjusted model after adjustment for pain level in post hoc analysis [OR = 1.04 (95% CI = 0.98–1.09)].

Conclusion:

This study demonstrates that women who are more physically active at midlife experience less bodily pain over time regardless of menopausal status, sociodemographics, and medical conditions. Higher physical activity level positively impacts fulfilling one’s physical role; however, this is mediated by pain level.

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Mylène Aubertin-Leheudre, Eric D.B. Goulet and Isabelle J. Dionne

Hormone-replacement therapy (HRT) attenuates the menopause-associated alterations in body composition. It is not known, however, whether this effect is a result of a concomitant increase in energy expenditure. The authors examined whether women submitted to a long-term HRT treatment presented greater energy expenditure than women who had never used HRT. We compared 13 postmenopausal women using HRT (>1 yr) with 13 age- (±2 yr) and body-mass-index-matched (BMI; ±1.5kg/m2) postmenopausal women not using HRT. Resting energy expenditure (REE; indirect calorimetry), body composition, and daily (DEE) and physical activity (PAEE) energy expenditure (accelerometry) were obtained. Although BMI, fat mass, fat-free mass, DEE, and PAEE were similar between groups, the HRT group displayed a significantly greater REE than the no-HRT group (Δ +222 kcal/day). In conclusion, the authors observed that a long-term treatment with HRT is associated with a greater REE in postmenopausal women. These results need to be confirmed.

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Jaqueline P. Batista, Igor M. Mariano, Tállita C.F. Souza, Juliene G. Costa, Jéssica S. Giolo, Nádia C. Cheik, Foued S. Espindola, Sarah Everman and Guilherme M. Puga

women have a lower rate of arterial hypertension and related diseases than men ( Coylewright, Reckelhoff, & Ouyang, 2008 ). However, after menopause, the risk of hypertension increases for women ( Barnes et al., 2014 ; Coylewright et al., 2008 ; Zanesco & Zaros, 2009 ), which may be related to

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David Silva, Ronaldo Gabriel, Helena Moreira, João Abrantes and Aurélio Faria

Podiatric Medical Association, 84 ( 10 ), 499 – 504 . PubMed doi:10.7547/87507315-84-10-499 10.7547/87507315-84-10-499 Monteiro , M. , Gabriel , R. , Castro , M. , Sousa , M. , Abrantes , J. , & Moreira , M. ( 2010 ). Exercise effects in plantar pressure of postmenopausal women . Menopause

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Tiego A. Diniz, Fabricio E. Rossi, Clara Suemi da Costa Rosa, Jorge Mota and Ismael F. Freitas-Junior

The objective of this study was to compare moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), minutes per week (min/wk), and fulfillment of the current recommendation (150 min/wk of MVPA) based on different cut-points in postmenopausal women. The sample was composed of 233 postmenopausal women aged 59.8 ± 6.7 years old. MVPA was measured using triaxial accelerometers. Accelerometers were initialized to collect in 60-s epochs. Participants were included if using at least 5 days. MVPA min/wk were obtained using Freedson, Troiano, Copeland, and Sasaki cut-points. Box-plot indicated large mean differences between almost all cut-points, except for Freedson and Troiano (9.3 [95% LoA: –5.6; 24.3] min/wk). The proportion of women who achieved 150 min/wk of MVPA was similar between Freedson and Troiano (31% vs. 30%). Sasaki and Copeland cut-points resulted in a greater proportion than other cut-points. We concluded that the cut-points analyzed generated different results in MVPA min/wk and low agreement when using current guidelines for MVPA pattern classification, except for the comparisons between Freedson and Troiano cut-points.

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Randhall B. Carteri, André Luis Lopes, Cinthia M. Schöler, Cleiton Silva Correa, Rodrigo C. Macedo, Júlia Silveira Gross, Renata Lopes Kruger, Paulo I. Homem de Bittencourt Jr and Álvaro Reischak-Oliveira

Background:

Since exercise increases the production of reactive oxygen species in different tissues, the objective of this study is to evaluate, compare and correlate the acute effects of aerobic and resistance exercise in circulatory markers of oxidative stress and acylated ghrelin (AG) in postmenopausal women.

Methods:

Ten postmenopausal women completed different protocols: a control session (CON), an aerobic exercise session (AERO); and a single-set (SSR) or 3-set (MSR) resistance exercise protocol.

Results:

After exercise, both MSR (P = .06) and AERO (P = .02) sessions showed significant increased lipid peroxidation compared with baseline levels. CON and SSR sessions showed no differences after exercise. No differences were found between sessions at any time for total glutathione, glutathione dissulfide or AG concentrations.

Conclusions:

Exercise significantly increased lipid peroxidation compared with baseline values. As pro oxidant stimuli is necessary to promote chronic adaptations to the antioxidant defenses induced by exercise, our findings are important to consider when evaluating exercise programs prescription variables aiming quality of life in this population.

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A. Elizabeth Ready, Glen Bergeron, Suzanne L. Boreskie, Barbara Naimark, John Ducas, Jo-Ann V. Sawatzky and Donald T. Drinkwater

This study was a retrospective analysis of injuries sustained by women (mean age 60.9) who completed a 24-week walking intervention. We hypothesized that those who walked 60 min, 5 days/week (n = 27) were more likely to have an injury than those who walked 3 days/week (n = 27), and that predisposing conditions would lead to more injuries. We also examined the effect of the initial 4 weeks’ walking progression on likelihood of injury. A total of 12% of the walkers reported injuries necessitating program withdrawal, 18% reported minor injuries, and 26% reported injuries requiring medical treatment. Age, weight, cardiovascular fitness level, and walking volume were not significantly related to injuries. Women with prior musculoskeletal conditions were more likely to sustain injuries requiring medical treatment (p < .01). For these women, the initial progression may have been too rapid, suggesting that musculoskeletal screening and gradual progression guided by staff is important for moderate as well as intense activity programs.